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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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Opening 


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Current Events 


32 


Academics 


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Sports 


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Student Life 


158 


Perspectives 


212 


Activities 


226 


Seniors 


272 


Closing 


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Sub Turri 




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16 President 




BOSTON COLLEGE 

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS 02167 
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT December 1990 



Members of the Class of 1991: 

As you entered Boston College in the fall of 1987, all of us 
were aware that the coming four years would be among the most 
enriching in your personal life . Today your abundance of memories 
and of friends confirm those expectations. 

But who of us could have foreseen that at your graduation the 
geography of the world would be redrawn. During your senior year a 
half century's barriers between peoples collapsed overnight. Yours 
is the first class in 50 years to begin careers with East and West 
seeking to fashion a common destiny. 

Your senior year also marked historic dates for the entire 
family of men and women who chose a Jesuit Institution to pursue 
their education. 1990-1991 marks the 450th Anniversary of the 
founding of the Jesuit order and the 500th Anniversary of the birth 
of its founder, Ignatius Loyola. The educational traditions that 
are yours reach back over four centuries and find their way to 
almost every country in the world. 

As graduates of Boston College you now carry in your persons 
the ideals of that tradition. You have enriched the tradition 
during your student years, and I know that you will continue it 
throughout your lives, in ways modest and dramatic, into the next 
century. 

May God richly bless you and all who will be your loved ones 
in the years ahead. 



Sincerely, 



C 



J 




J. Donald Monan, S.J. 
President 



JDM/er 



President 17 



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32 Current Events 

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Current Events 

This past year has witnessed developments which 
would have seemed inconceivable to us just one 
year ago. We initially began in a state of euphoria, 
rejoicing over the sweeping changes in Eastern 
Europe, the end of the Cold War, and the release of 
long-time political prisoner. Nelson Mandela. How- 
everthese encouraging milestones were soon rudely 
interrupted by the startling developments in the 
Middle East in countries most Americans couldn't 
even locate on a map. Meanwhile, America fell 
into a recession while Gorbachev struggled to keep 
the Soviet Union in order, resorting to military at- 
tacks on the Baltic States. After this global 
rollercoaster, we now find ourselves inquiring how 
this striking chain of events will affect both our 
nation and our community in the future. 





Current Events 33 



War in the Gulf 



In the early morning hours of August 2, following negotiations and promises by Iraq's dictator, Saddam Hussein, not to use force, 
a powerful Iraqi army invaded Kuwait. Within three days, 1 20,000 Iraqi troops with 850 tanks had poured into Kuwait. The United 
States wasted no time in answering the aggression, building up a U.S. force of over 100,000 troops in neighboring Saudi Arabia. 
After the United Nations' January 15 deadline for the withdrawal of all Iraqi forces from Kuwait had passed, the Allied forces 
launched a massive air offensive on January 16. With current forces at over 500,000 troops. Operation Desert Storm marks the 
largest military operation since the Vietnam war. 




Saddam Hussein (right), president 
of Iraq, invaded Kuwait in August, 
1990, and most of the world be- 
came his enemy. The 53-year-old 
strongman, who had battled with 
Iran for many years, found-himself 
facing an even more formidable 
force , as his army confronted forces 
from around the world. 



34 Gulf Crisis 




Reaction at B.C. 



Reaction to the events in the Persian Gulf 
was strong at Boston Coliege, both for 
and against the use of force in the Guif . 
Students expressed their beliefs in many 
ways - from the flags, peace signs, and 
yellow ribbons decorating the dorms to 
the masses, panel discussions, and peace 
rallies. 




Domestic Turmoil 



On January 26, 1 99 1 , an estimated 300,000 people marchied in Washington, D.C. to protest the U.S. stance on the crisis in 
the Gulf. A group of Boston College students participated in the march, with representatives from WZBC and the Boston 
College Coalition for Peace. However reaction to their actions was mixed. While some supported their efforts, others 
claimed that the demonstration only sent a negative message to our troops currently serving in the Gulf. 



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36 Peace March 




Banking hit a brick wall in the 1 990s. 
It is estimated that the losses - through 
bad management, bad loans, and 
bad people - will be in the billions of 
dollars. One of the good guys in all 
this is L. William Seidman (left), the 
charimanoftheFDIC. Inhislate60s, 
Seidman has his work cut out for 
him. The industry Is in so much 
trouble, the FDIC has been forced 
to cover their losses by refunding 
money to people who lost their 
savings. 




David Souter (left) became the lat- 
est member of the Supreme Court in 
October. He is known in his adopted 
home state of New Hampshire as a 
brilliant legal scholar, a diligentjudge 
and a private man who never 
married. The 51 -year-old Supreme 
Court Justice was described by one 
Congressman as "a classic conser- 
vative with great reverence for the 
Constitution and the law." Souter is 
seen here with President Bush after 
his nomination was announced. 



Current Events 37 



The Cold War Thaws 



It was a time of change in Eastern Europe (below). Communism became a subject for thie history books as fragile 
market economies began to take root in this region. Demonstrators demanding an end to Communist Party 
domination lit candles and placed flowers on the bloodstained sidewalks where police had attacked protestors in the 
largest such rally in 20 years. Thousands of students marched for hours to commemorate student Jan Opietal, killed 
by Nazis 50 years ago. When demonstrators in Prague tried to reach central Wenceslas Square, police attacked them 
with tear gas, dogs, and clubs. 




Food has become a scarce commodity 
in the Soviet Union (right). As shoppers 
grumbled, even bread - cheap and al- 
ways plentiful - joined a growing list of 
hard-to-get items that included tobacco, 
paper, and gasoline. Anatoly Znamensky, 
a 66-year-old retired taxi driver said, 
"Vegetables, fruit, cheese, butter, meat - 
they appear and disappear. But with 
bread there was never a problem, until 
now." It was severe domestic crises such 
as these which posed serious threats to 
Gorbachev and his attempts at reform. 

38 Current Events 





President George Bush and President 
Mikhiail Gorbachev (left) held several 
summits during 1 990, demonstrating that 
the Cold War between the two super- 
powers has ended and an era ot coop- 
eration has begun. (However Gorbachev 
struggled on the home front as he at- 
tempted to unite and reform the Soviet 
Union into a cohesive market economy. 
Although the Communist Party and the 
government both agree that reform is 
necessary , they strongly disagree on how 
to achieve it, exacerbating the already 
critical economic condition. 



After months of debate and years of 
struggle. East Germany and West Ger- 
many became the Federal Republic of 

Germany (below left) on Octobers, 1 990. 
The new country will have a total popu- 
lation of nearly 78 million people and will 
occupy 1 37,743 square miles. Berlin be- 
came the capital, with Bonn 
astheseatofgovernment. The 
event was celebrated with an 
emotional concert given by 
Roger Waters, of Pink Floyd, to 
commerate the fall of the infa- 
mous Berlin Wall. 



Current Events 39 



People & Entertainment 



Jim Henson (below) was a puppeteer with an enormous following. On May 16,1 990, 
at the age of 53, he died from a severe case of pneumonia. During his career, he 
created an endearing menagerie of creatures, characters of timeless appeal. In 
1969, Henson's creations - Kermit, Big Bird and Cookie Monster - first appeared on 
public TV's Sesame Street. Then, in 1 976, The Muppet Show was born. His creations 
will live forever in our memories - Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear, Gonzo, Ernie and Bert, the 
Swedish Chef, and many, many others. 



In December, 1990, Sports Illustrated 
named 35-year-old Joe Montana (be- 
low) Sportsman of the Year, the first time 
in the history of the title that a single NFL 
player was granted this title. With one of 
the richest contracts in NFL history ($13 
million over 4 years), Montana has been 
called by some the greatest quarterback 
in the history of football. However, this still 
wasn't enough to bring the San Francisco 
49ers to their expected berth as three- 
peat Superbowl Champions. 




33-year-old filmmaker Spike Lee (above 
with his sister) is on a roll. Following rove 
reviews of the unconventional "Do The 
Right Thing ," he released "Mo' Better Blues. " 
Donald and Ivana Trump (right) finalized 
their divorce, while Trump's millions slowly 
eroded to the edge of financial disaster. 




M.C. Hammer (left) is a 27-year-old rap- 
per from Oakland, Co. who is really hot. 
His second album, "Please hiammer Don't 
Hurt 'Em," sold nearly 5 million copies, 
Hammer's concertsare an extravaganza, 
complete with 32 performers, cutting- 
edge costumes, and some of the flashi- 
est footwork being done on stage today. 
23-year-old Irish singer Sinead O'Connor 
(below) has been topping the charts all 
year with her latest album, "I Do Not Want 
What I Haven't Got." To top off her year 
of success, her avant-garde "Nothing 
Compares 2 U" won for Best Female Video. 




!-Live Crew (above) is a group that 
node big headlines. The police in 
lorida considered their album, "As 
^asty As You Wanna Be" to be ob- 
cene. After numerous legal battles, 
!-Live Crew fought back with their 
elease of "Banned in the U.S.A." 



The obnoxious Boston-based group. New Kids 
on the Block (above), has sold a cumulative 
17million albums, with three No. 1 singles. With 
teeny-bopper groupies worldwide, the group 
aged 17 to 22 has turned out numerous hits 
and an even greater amount of memorabilia. 



Rock superstar Phil Collins (above) 
started out as a drummer in the hit group 
Genesis. He revived the group's career in 
1976 by stepping forward as vocalist, 
and later went solo. His latest album, 
"...But Seriously," established him as one 
of the leading rock stars of the year. 




Academics 



"Redefining traditions." Tliis term sounds somewhat 
lil<e an oxymoron in the world of academics. After 
aii , how many ways can there be to teach Aristotie's 
Politics , or to teach a Nursing student how to give 
an injection, or to teach how to make sense of an 
actuary table. Teaching methods and subjects 
have changed, reflecting the now orrinipresent 
computer technology and cultural and environ- 
mental awareness. Attitudes and philosophies to- 
wards subjects that were non-existent only a de- 
cade ago now pervade the classrooms at Boston 
College. Smart, ambitious students in conjunction 
with caring professors and gentle guidance under 
the Jesuit tradition are the reason Barron's Guide to 
Colleges and Universities names Boston College as 
one of the 45 most competitive universities in the 
United States. 




Academics 43 




44 Academics 



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College of Arts and Sciences 




While the College of Arts and 
Sciences is constantly "redefining 
tradition," the tradition — in all the 
major areas of natural sciences, so- 
cial sciences, and humanities — re- 
mains strong. There have been par- 
ticularly dramatic changes in the 
arts. In the Fall of 1989, the Depart- 
ment of Music was established at 
Boston College, and a year later a 
music major was in place. The 
visual arts, too, the upcoming 
move of the Fine Arts Department 
to the main campus and the evolu- 
tion of the Art Gallery into the 
Boston College Museum of Art 
mark a new stage in our history. 

There is also a new impetus in the 
sciences, symbolized by the 
appearance on the B.C. skyline of 
the new Chemistry building. This 
new presence, along with such 
ventures as the Science Newsletter, 
are expected to give the sciences 
renewed visibility and fresh dyna- 
mism on the B.C. campus. 

Along with these, the traditional 
commitment to "educating 
women and men for others" is 
marked by numerous develop- 
ments: a renewed commitment 
and expansion of the Faith, Peace 
&. Justice Program; a $750,000 
grant from the Dayton Hudson 
Foundation for our justly celebrat- 
ed Pulse Program; and a major 
grant from the Ford Foundation 
allowing us to look more closely at 
the need to bring cultural diversity 
into our academic programs. 

In short, the College of Arts and 
Sciences — along with B.C. itself — 
is on the move! 

— J. Robert Barth, S.J. 



J. Robert 

Barth, SJ., 

Dean 



46 College of Arts &. Sciences 







College of Arts & Sciences 47 




48 Carroll School of Management 



Carroll School of Management 



I The Carroll School of 
/lanagement is in the pro- 
;ess of a major planning 
iffort which will no doubt 
3sult in some new initia- 
ves. We have already 
)egun this decade with a 
9newed vigor and sense 
if purpose. The curriculum 
i changing to reflect the 
jrowing conciousness of a 
)lobal economy, For in- 
tance, we are one of the 
I ery few business or man- 
agement schools in the 
;ountrY to require compe- 
ency in a foreign lan- 
ijuage. Ideally, we would 
' ke to see a very large pro- 
|)ortion of our under- 
■ jraduates work or study 
^ ibroad before they grad- 
' iote. 

Hence, I see the major 
irust of this School in the 
lext decade to be to- 
wards international con- 
cerns, increased technical 
competence, and a 
growing sense of respon- 
ibility which we all share 
ogether. 

— John J. Neuhauser 



John J. 

Meuhauser, 

Dean 




Carroll School of Management 49 



School of Nursing 




Catherine 

P. Murphy, 

Dean 



The School of Nursing Class of 
1991 Is poised to go forth In society 
and demonstrate how the profes- 
sion of nursing has redefined Its 
traditions. Ever faithful to Its histori- 
cal mission to educate men and 
women to excel In the service of 
others, the School of Nursing con- 
tinues to face the challenge of pre- 
paring humane, compassionate 
and competent professionals. 
Nurses represent almost sixty per- 
cent of all health care pro- 
fessionals, and they are the Indi- 
viduals most often entrusted with 
the ongoing responsibility for the 
health, welfare and safety of health 
care recipients. The graduates of 
1991 must be able to function in a 
challenging health care arena 
which faces great economic con- 
straints and serious inequities In the 
allocation of health care resources. 

The future holds many uncer- 
tainties In our society, but the op- 
portunities for the nursing class of 
1991 look very optimistic. The in- 
creasing societal awareness of the 
need for nursing care In our aging 
society and for nursing treatment 
and prevention of health problems 
in healthy and chronically III popu- 
lations has created numerous new 
roles for nurses. This dramatic in- 
crease in the demand for nursing 
services has opened up new 
arenas of responsibility. 

The trends toward nursing auton- 
omy and quality nursing judgments 
In health care have placed a great 
deal of emphasis on the edu- 
cational preparation of pro- 
fessional nurses. An integral part of 
this education Is the development 
of critical and ethical reasoning 
skills on the part of nursing students. 
The hallmarks of Jesuit education 
received here at the Boston Col- 
lege School of Nursing prepare the 
Class of 1991 to make highly re- 
sponsible and ethically account- 
able nursing judgments. Your edu- 
cation prepares each of you to re- 
define the traditions of your chosen 
profession with the highest degree 
of ethical standards. Best wishes to 
each member of the Class of 1991. 
— Catherine P. Murphy 



50 School of Nursing 




School of Nursing 51 



School of Education 




During the 1990's, the 
School of Education will 
be redefining traditions in 
the preparation of teach- 
ers and other human ser- 
vice professionals. There is 
a great rebirth of interest 
among young people in 
the human services. Many 
of these students are 
attracted to Boston Col- 
lege because of its Jesuit 
tradition in the preparation 
of young men and women 
for service to others, The 
School, consistent with a 
national movement of re- 
form in the preparation of 
teachers, will continue to 
increase the importance 
of preparation in the lib- 
eral arts and sciences for 
its undergraduate stu- 
dents. This, coupled with 
increased emphasis on 
educational research and 
theory to the challenges of 
field practice, will ensure 
that Boston College con- 
tinues to prepare very well 
qualified members for the 
profession. 

— Dean Diana C. Pullin 



Anabel P. 

Casey, 

Assistant 

Dean 



52 School of Education 



a 




^ if 1^ 





School of Education 53 




54 O'Neill Library 



O'Neill: The Study Choice Of Champions 







O'Neill Library 55 



Bapst: They Don't Make 'em Like They Used to. 



56 Bapst Library 





Bapst Library 57 



O'Neill Computing Facility 

The Friendly Computer Center 





All photos by Mary Manion 



58 O'Neill 




O'Neill 59 




60 Studying 




studying 61 



BC Campus School: 
Giving and Learning 




62 Campus School 




Campus School 63 




64 Junior Year Abroad 




V 



V*^' 



^ 



Around the World 

in One Semester 

Junior Year Abroad 






^ 






Junior Year Abroad 65 




66 Career Center 




M 





Career Ceriter 67 



Art Gallery 

The Goya Exhibit 




68 Art Gallery 




Art Gallery 69 



William B. Neenan S.J. 
Academic Vice President 




1 



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70 Academics 



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Academics 71 




72 Academics 




Academics 73 




Sports 



It was a year of dramatic chiange for the Athletic 
Department at the Heights this year. A new athletic 
director and football coach were named, and the 
Eagles' football future became brighter with the 
formation of a Big East football conference. 

It was also a year of tremendous success for B.C.'s 
teams. The men's hockey and tennis teams and the 
women's swimming teams all continued to domi- 
nate as they have in the past. In addition, the men's 
soccer team won the Big East tournament for the 
first time in eight years. The men's basketball and 
football teams, both competing with some of the 
toughest schedules of any team in the nation, 
improved significantly. 

The potential of the incoming administration com- 
bined with the strong foundation laid by the previ- 
ous one promises to bring continued success to the 
Heights, 



Sports 75 



Season On The Edge 




Eagles walk the tightrope between 
winning/losing season 



har 

Offi 

Frol 

Eas 

Tl 
roa 
ba 



out 

first 
8C 



1991 Boston College football team fln- 
a heartbreaking 4 and 7 season. Jhe 
returned to camp ttils year with a slngle- 
ledness of purpose. No frills or catchy 
s; they simply wanted to win football 
s and prove to themselves and fans that 
revious 2 and 9 record did not reflect 
eterminatlon and ability. Facing a formi- 
season ahead of them, including The 
nal Champion University of Miami Hur- 
s and Hall Of Fame Bowl Ohio State 
Budjfeyes, the Boston College Eagles waged a 
fought campaign that displayed their 
ive dynamism and defensive tenacity, 
the Heights to West Virginia, to Miami, the 
s made their fans proud. 
Eagles began their campaign on the 
against the Pitt Panthers led by Quarter- 
Alex Van Pelt (who had thrown for 2881 
and 17 TDs the previous season). The Pan- 
theiHianded the Eagles their first defeat, with a 
doi lant 29 to 6 score. The BC defense stood 
s a force to be reckoned with. Facing a 
id goal from their own three yard line, the 
ifense proved impenetrable, denying the 
Pollers a score on all four attempts. Un- 
fort ately, the following week's home opener 
agi ist Big Ten powerhouse Ohio State proved 
eqi lly frustrating. The Sporting News dubbed 
the jckeye backfield, led by senior fullback 
Sec e Graham, the best in the nation. The 
po: ^rful Buckeye offense dominated, as was 
refl ted by the 31 to 10 finish. Again, though, 
the agle defense remained charged, high- 
igl id by Jay Clark's exciting interception 
lea ig to the Eagle's only touchdown of the 
dd 

September 29, the Navy Midshipmen 
cc}|^ to the Heights still glowing from their 
27-24 victory the previous year. The 
(S hod no intention of a repeat. Led by 
nan quarterback, Glenn Foley (223 YDs 3 
|he Eagles soundly defeated the Middies 
The winning continued the following 
J as The Eagles defeated the Rutgers Scar- 
lights in an exciting 19-14 edge of your seat 
Ihe Army Cadets come to Chestnut Hill the 
1/ing week. On this rainy, blustery day, the 
pts should never hove come out of the 
room. The Eagles thrashed Army, 41-20. 
3gles were relentless on both sides of the 
|.ed offensively by Glenn Foley and tri cap- 
3ceiver Ray Hilvert and defensively by tri 
i\u Kevin Pearson (11 tackles, 2 sacks) the 



Eagles basked in their first winning record (3-2) 
since 1986. However, their elation was short 
lived. The Penn State Nittany Lions, who were 
the 1989 Holiday Bowl Champions, took the 
field at Alumni on October 20. The 40-21 final 
did not at all reflect the closeness of the game. 
Glenn Foley threw a thirteen yard touchdown 
strike to junior tight end Mark Chmura. This 
marked Chmura's 100th career reception in an 
illustrious career at the Heights. The score was 
27-24 in the fourth quarter. However a series of 
errors including 2 interceptions led to the 
Eagles' ultimate defeat. The team travelled to 
West Virginia to play the Mountaineers who 
were ranked comfortably 40 teams above the 
Eagles in the national polls. A conservative but 
effective offensive attack and an unforgiving 
defense anchored by senior linebacker Matt 
Kelley and captain Kevin Pearson secured a 
27-14 victory for the Eagles. 

The Homecoming curse continued again this 
year with a frustrating loss to the Syracuse 
Orangemen 35-6. The Eagles then travelled to 
Dixie to challenge the Louisville Cardinals. De- 
spite injuries to crucial receivers like Andre 
Green, Jason Swepson, and sophomores Ivan 
Boyd and Keith Miller, the Eagles perservered 
for four quarters of tough football. Victory was 
almost theirs when Foley tossed a perfect ball 
to captain Ray Hilvert in the endzone with 3 
seconds in the game. Heavily defended, even 
Hilvert was unable to come down with the ball 
for the touchdown. 

The following week, the Eagles flew to Miami 
along with a sizeable student contingent to 
play the National Champion Miami Hurricanes 
in the infamous Orange Bowl. Still wounded 
from the injuries against Louisville, Coach Jack 
Bicknell was concerned about the offensive 
potency of his team. However the whole squad 
pulled together and orchestrated a brilliant first 
half against the 'Canes. One of the biggest 
reasons for the Eagle ferocious first half was 
senior outside linebacker Ivan Caesar. He 
racked up seven unassisted tackles, caused 
two fumbles and one quarterback sack, recov- 
ered a fumble, and intercepted a pass and re- 
turned it 25 yards to the Miami 1 yard line to set 
up an Eagle touchdown. Despite a superlative 
effort by players and coaches alike, the Hur- 
ricanes returned from the halftime break and 
expanded their 14-12 lead to a 42-12 victor/. 
The campaign ended with a loss to the Temple 
Owls 29-10. 




The program surely will miss the departing 
seniors and its three captains, Ray Hilvert, Kevin 
Pearson and Mike Sanders. Offensively and de- 
fensively the seniors have helped to elevate the 
quality and competitiveness of the program. 
They have left a legacy of perserverence, de- 
termination and tenacity. Boston College foot- 
ball, thanks to their contribution, has es- 
tablished a higher level of excellence and ex- 
citement. 



-1 : -_ ' .S1L Ttf.. 




JjpJWWWWWPJWll 



Senior quarterback Willie Hicks, 
shown here rounding the comer 
against Syracuse, was one of the 
Eagles' most versatile players. 
However, an early arm injury 
hampered his performance. 



Mary Manion 



Fifth year senior Ray Hilvert 
displayed acrobatic talent when 
hauling in passes, making him 
EC's most dangerous receiver. 



Andre Green hauls in a pass against 
in spectacular fashion. Green 
became one of the Eagles top 
receivers after sitting out a year. 




The offensive line bent but 
rarely broke 



While Green sparked the 

offense. Pohopek showed 

soft hands well, intercepting 

five passes in the first five 

games. 



• f . VJ ' 



^ 







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Man Manion 




Junior Mark Chmura was one of college football's 
top tight ends. Shown here making a catch 
against Army, Mark was one of the Eagle's best 
receivers as well as a strong blocker. 




Mary M anion 






Ed Toner, a fifth year senior 
exploded this year leading the 
backfield with his straight-ahead 
running style. 



Jay Clark rose to the occasion 
more than once, blocking 
five kicks. 



^^k- 

^ -^^s 



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— n^ 



T ^^ORTS ' 






Junior punter Bill Kushner 

showed consistency, 

averaging over 36 yards per 

game. 




Top rusher Mike Sanders 

slips through the hole 

showing speed and agility 



Mike Dolan 





Looking to unload a bullet 
downfield, QB Glenn Foley 
will play a big part in the 
Eagles' future. 



Mary Manioin 



^'.% 





86 Football 



■m 



Ivan Caesar (top), 
John Ravenna, 
and Carl Lenz 
were mainstays 
on the tenacious 
defensive unit. 




Football 87 




The Eagles' defensive unit celebrates a 
big stop against Ohio State. The 
defense proved to be a big factor in the 
outcome of many of the games. 



Mary Manioi 



The season seemed to go downhill after the 
suspension of senior running back Tim Frager for 
testing positive for an NCAA banned substance. 
Tim was the team's top rusher and kickoff 
returner. 



Chmura takes one in against Penn State. 




Scoreboard 



Pitt 


6-29 


Ohio State 


10-31 


Navy 


28-17 


Rutgers 


19-14 


Army 


41-20 


Penn State 


21-40 


W. Virginia 


27-14 


Syracuse 


6-35 


Louisville 


17-10 


Miami 


42-12 


Temple 


29-10 



Mar\ Manion 




Mary Manion 



"The seniors have brought maturity and 
knowledge of big games, like the Hall of 
Fame Bowl." Jack Bicknell 



Sophomore TE Bob Bicknell showed 
promise this year averaging over ten 
yards per catch. 





oUey to Win 





,pFit ihis season despite sever^ 
.ISy players. Afi-er a slow start, th^ 
lebounded and won iwo stroigb-^ 



c 1 ournoment. 

._ — 'O set some hig 

s happy with th-^ i^>-^^^>^ 

pieni or nis ream. The Eagles were lea u 

fco-captains Jen MacEnroe and -Elle 

ilumenberg, who provided leodershi; 

and experience along with senior rnidd! 

Mff^r Ion Smith, Junior transfete'^'*'^"^ 

Hovna also played well and wdf^ 
;to the Wisconsin-Green Bay All 
tournament team with sophomor 
Heather Cody, Despite an injured shoul- 
der, junior Maryelien MacKinnon was one 
of the top outside hitters in the conference. 




90 Women's Volleyball 




Women's Volleyball 91 




BC Wins the Big East 






92 Mens Soccer 




The 1990 season for the, men's 
soccer team was one of excel- 
lence. Picked fifth in the pre-season 
Big East polls, the Eagles shocked 
the soccer world by defeating na- 
tionally ranked teams en route to 
capturing their first ever Big East 
championship, and returning to the 
NCAA tournament for the first time 
since 1981. 

In just his third season at the helm 
of the Eagles soccer program. 
Coach Ed Kelly has twice guided 
BCtothe Big East tournament, earn- 
ing Big East "Coach of the Year" 
honors. 

The season started off with a 
bang as the Eagle booters 
knocked off nationally ranked 
George Washington University and 
UConn while tying Comm. Ave. 
rivals BU, who were also ranked. 
These early successes gave BC the 
momentum it needed to carry them 
through their tough schedule of op- 
ponents. The Eagles finished their 
season with a record of 12 wins, 4 
losses, and 2 ties, defeating such 
powerhouses as Hartwick and Se- 
ton Hall, and maintaining a high 
ranking in the New England region. 

Once they received the bid for 
the Big East tourney, the Eagles 
were not predicted to even come 
close to the championship game. 
However, instrumental play by 
senior captain Andy Sage and 
sophomore sensation Justin Ciccar- 
elli enabled BC to fly by Syracuse 
2-0 in the semifinals and squeeze 



out a double overtime win against 
Seton Hall in the championship 
game. Sage's leadership and ex- 
perience helped him control the 
midfield and led him to an All-Big 
East First Team selection. Ciccarelli, 
who scored the game winning goal 
of the championship game, was 
named the tournament's Most Val- 
uable Player. 

With their championship victory, 
the Eagles received an automatic 
bid to the NCAA tournament. Ironi- 
cally, BC was matched up against 
the team they had tied earlier in the 
season — cross town rival BU. The 
match was played on a bitter cold 
day at Nickerson Field. BC domi- 
nated the first two halves until they 
were riding a comfortable 2-0 lead 
with less than twenty minutes to 
play. Then with the most peculiar 
twist of fate, the Terriers, playing a 
man down, reeled off three unan- 
swered goals to hand the Eagles a 
heartbreaking 3-2 loss and an elim- 
ination from the tournament. 

Although it is difficult to single out 
the play of any one particular team 
member, Chris "Bella" Lugossy, R.P. 
Beurlein, Chris Ogbannah, Brendan 
McCarthy, and Scott Ferguson all 
played above their potential. The 
Senior "Iron Fist" members Ricky 
^^the Kid" Hampson, Matt "the 
Ayatollah in the Goal-a" Renola, 
Johnny "15 second" Mairo, along 
with Andy "La La" Sage and Lugos- 
sy each contributed to the total 
team effort. 



Co-Senior Captain Andy Sage 

led the Eagles to their most 

successful season in eight years. 



Mens Soccer 93 



w^ 




Chick" drives around a Bia East defender from '^ 
Selon Hall as R!?. Berlicn looks on. -SI 



J 



94 Men's Soccer 



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N 








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^ 








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^IQK^ai'^Wt.'WW'Wv 




Senior Chris Lugoussy high stepped his 

way through the season leading the 

team with his offensive prowess. 



Chris "Wheels" Ougbannah provided 

the speed the Eagles needed to 

outdistance opponents such as Seton 

Hall. 






"We had a tremendous season" — Matt 

Renola 





Mary Mani^ 


Scoreboard 


George Washington 


2-0 


UConn 


4-3 


Syracuse 


1-3 


BU 


0-0 


St. Johns 


2-1 


Hartford 


1-0 


Villanova 


1-0 


Dartmouth 


1-3 


Southern Conn 


1-5 


Brown 


3-2 


Seton Hall 


2-1 


Providence 


0-0 


Georgetown 


2-0 


Pittsburgh 
Harvard 


0-1 


1-0 


Hartwick 


3-1 


Holy Cross 


4-1 


URI 


3-1 


Big East Syracuse 


2-0 


Big East (Seton Hall) 


2-1 



96 Mens Soccer 





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R.P. Beurlian 



Below Left: Big East MVP Justin 
Cicerelli blasts a shot home. Below: 
Coach Ed Kelly had much to cheer 
about after beating his old school in the 
Big East Tournament. 




Mens Soccer 97 



Off and Running 



_l 

BC gets off to a fast start 




Kevin Keating 



98 Track & Field 




Track & Field 99 



Layiiig the Foundation 



dy Booters Rebuild 



This season was a transitional 
year for the Boston Coliege 
Wormen's soocer team. First 
year coach Terez Bonerden 
took charge and ied the team 
to a record of six wins eight 
losses and four ties. Tri-captains 
Shelly Heisey, Nicole Kondi and 
Gina Vassallo helped lead the 
team through a tough sched- 



ule which included eight top 
twenty teams, Senior Teresa 
Pruett was outstanding in the 
goal, while Ail-American 
Pauia Schwatzbaur ied the de- 
fense, After a disappointing trip 
to North Carolina the lady 
Eagles bounced back to de- 
feat the number five team in 
the nation, U, Conn, Two other 



big wins over Stonybrook and 
St, Johns came at the team's 
trip to New York, Although the 
teams record, the team con- 
sidered the season a great suc- 
cess. Through much adversity, 
the team was able to keep a 
good attitude and learn many 
valuable lessons. 



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A l:iil\ liool 



ono home. 



Mary Manion 



100 Woiiu'iis Soccer 





Scoreboard 



BC 





BC 


1 


BC 





BC 





BC 


3 


BC 





BC 





BC 





BC 


1 


BC 


2 


BC 





BC 


1 


BC 


1 


BC 





BC 


3 


BC 


1 


BC 


1 



UVM 

Hartford 

Wm & Mary 

Ucal-Berkley 

Holy Cross 

Duke 

NC State 

UNH 

UCONN 

Dartmoutti 

Harvard 

Cornell 

Colgate 

Providence 

St. Jotins 

Stonybrook 

Brown 







"Season was a transitional 
year." 



Senior Niciil 


e Koni 


li 


hrmi};lil cxpc 


riLMlCC 


^ind 


Iciulcrship In 


Ihc !-.; 


};lcs. 



lary Manion 



Womeiis Soccer 1 1 











f 


1 What a Racquet! 


1 


1 BC Tennis continues 




'1 


ft 


■hM^^^^^ its winning ways 






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Senior Regina Fagan has been a strong and consistent 
player for four years. 



s^'- 



The 1990 season saw the 
women's tennis teann capture their 
fifth consecutive Big East title, and a 
first place ranking in the east with 
an impressive record. 

Providing the team with leader- 
ship and strength at the number two 
doubles position were co-captains 
Michelle Chua and Regina Fagan, 
who, play #3 and #5 positions, re- 
spectively. In addition, there was a 



wealth of talent from the junior 
class, including first and second 
singles players, Pam Piorkowski and 
Jen Lane who also teamed up for 
the strongest doubles team in the 
East. Providing depth and consis- 
tency were juniors Megan Wilson, 
Angle Gabbett and senior Ellen 
Goudy. Another source of strength 
for the Lady Eagles was the third 
doubles team of Megan Wilson 



and Patti Tolerico. The team only 
hopes to improve with the likes of 
Laura Walls, Camilla and Amy. 

Through a combination of young 
talent, able coaching (under fifth 
year coach Mark Burns) and the 
continued desire to be number 
one, the Women's tennis team will 
not only continue in their winning 
tradition but reach goals not yet 
attained. 



102 Women's Tennis 




splays a powerful serve which helped BC lo 




"O.^"^ 



riies out ©I gas m 



% 



It looked like this would be the 
year. The Eagles, playing at the top 
of their game, were supposed to 
run away with the title that has 
eluded them since 1983. However, 
the jinx which has haunted BC for 
these eight years, continued in the 
39th Beanpot Championship 
played at the Boston Garden on 
February 11th. 

Things started off well enough for ^ 
the Eagles, with a decisive win over = 
the Northeastern Huskies in the first |. 
round of the tournament. After " 
trailing 2-0 in the first period, the 
Eagles put it into high gear to win 5- 
3, despite the dazzling play of 
Husky goalie Tom Cole, who had 51 
saves. 

The Eagles opened their scoring 
when senior Matt Glennon put a 
backhander past Cole thanks to 
assists from seniors Jeff O'Neil and 
Dave Pergola. NU came right back 
to score at 8:12 in the second 
period, which left BC fans wonder- 
ing if the Eagles would be playing in 
yet another consolation game. 

However, Marc Beran put those 
fears to rest when he stuffed an 
Emma rebound through the Husky 
netminder's pads. Senior Sean 
Farley then poked one through at 
18:30 to tie the game at three. 

Jack Callahan broke the tie at 
10:40 on a Pascucci rebound just as 
a BC power play was about to end. 
Senior David Emma then put the 
contest out of reach for the Huskies 
with two minutes to go with his 224th 
career point becoming the all-time 
scoring leader at the Heights. It was 
a fitting cap for the evening, as the 
Eagles prepared to take on arch- 






^/Si 



Marc Beran sends a blast past 
Husky netminder Tom Cole in 
the first round. 





rival Boston University in the final. 

Upon scoring the first goal, it 
looked bright for the Eagles'. How- 
ever their fortunes were to quickly 
change for the worse when BU 
promptly answered with their own 
goal. The two foes exchanged 
goals until the score read 3-2 at the 
end of the first period. This con- 
tinued into the second period until 
BC was called for two penalties in a 
row, leaving the Eagles two men 
short. The Terriers took full ad- 
vantage of this and led at the end 
of the period 6-4, 



Looking like they had already 
been defeated, the Eagles' took 
the ice in the third period playing 
far below their potential. BU, on the 
other hand, played at the top of 
their game and put the gome out of 
reach with two unanswered goals. 
By game's end, the Terriers had 
completely outplayed the Eagles 
and emerged with a 8-4 cham- 
pionship victory. 

And so the Eagles' frustration con- 
tinues. 



104 Beanpot 




Heinze finished liis spectacular 
move through the Terriers' 
defense by tucking it behind 
goalkeeper Bradley. 



Beanpot 105 




3!?--- 



t 



f^aumfo^is^sisff ■ 



s year's Eagle Squad was led by seniors Thomas LeClair, 
Captain Todd Barrett, and John Simon. The team got off to a slow 
start with a 13th place finish at the Army Invitational. However, the 
team rebounded at the Yale Invitational with a 10th place finish 
among a very strong field, Tim Magner played very solid for the 
Eagles on Yale's tough track finishing 23rd overall. This success 
continued through to the Big East, with the Eagles, grabbing 3rd 
place as team and with the great New Jersey junior player Peter 
Keller capturing the individual prize. The team finished the strong 
fall season with 8th place finish in the New England Champion- 
ships, and individually junior Dan Mulkem shot a pair 77's to finish 
9th. 

For the fourth consecutive year, coach Carroll led the squad 
out to Arizona for the 9 day road trip in which the team took on 
Phil Mickelson and company on ASU's newly-built Pete Dye 
course. However, senior Tom LeClair was in Miami interviewing 
and juniors Tim Magner and Dan Hostetfer were in Europe pursu- 
ing their language degrees. Nonetheless, the trip was a success 
and coach Carroll is very confident in his eagle squad to pro- 
duce some solid golf this spring. The only down note for this year's 
team was the misfortune of many Seniors unable to compete due 
to their career or academic pursuits which made it impossible for 
them to swing on the links as much as they would have liked. They 
were the following: Robert Madden, John Heinze, Dave Heshon, 
Jay Duke, Brian Sullivan, 8c Joe Locker. 




Golf 107 



CIVILIZED CHAOS 




9 



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7%^ 






o^-^ 



The Eagles ruck over their Qppj^ents 



^i^-^-*^»,j5^ 




108 Men's Rugby 



SCRUM UP 1 

buggers Sparkle in Successful Season 




Women's Rugby 109 




KrL^ty Mathews 




Eagles On Ice 






i? 



^1 



,y^ii!ssk\Ti: 



men's Hockey 




Scoreboard 




BC 


4 


BC 


? 


BC 


n 


BC 


1 


BC 


7 


BC 


n 


BC 





BC 


? 


BC 


5 


BC 


n 


BC 


n 


BC 


1 


BC 


? 


BC 


1 


BC 


n 


BC 


n 


BC 


6 


BC 


4 


BC 


4 


BC 






Maine 

BU 

Providence 

Nor'eastem 

Vermont 

Harvard 

Brown 

MIT 

Wesleyon 

Yale 

Colgate 

Colby 

Vermont 

Bowdoin 

Middlebury 

Nor'eastem 

Maine 

Beanpot 

RPI 

MIT 



U photos by Kristy Mathews 





•C fakes-out the Colby 
oal keeper en route to a 
:ore. 



Women's Hockey 111 




1 12 Sailing 



BC makes a move on the 

choppy waters of the River 

Charles. 

Jon controls his vessel to 
victory. 




i 




Sailing 1 13 




Mary Manion 



The Varsity Swim Team found itseif iool<- 
ing ainead to a competitive schedule. The 
incoming freshman class were impressive 
and as always Tom Groden, head coach, 
had a talented group of athletes, Teresa 
Hooland and Amy Matson are Co Cap- 
tains of the women's team, and Rick 
McMorrow, Rob Strong, and Craig Jones 
are the Tri Captains for the IVIen's team. 

The season opened for the women's 
team on November 6 with a victor/ over 
the Black Knights of West Point, Both the 
Men's and Women's teams travelled to 
Sherbrooke, Canada for the Vert and Or 
Invitational, The Eagles swam convincingly 
past the Canadians — The women win- 



ning the invitational and the men finishing 
a strong second. The team also competed 
at the National Catholic Championships 
at Notre Dame. The women were 4-0 and 
the men 2-2 going into the championship 
meet. The men finished 5th and the women 
3rd. 

The team trained arduously in St. Croix 
for 8 days over Christmas break. Our own 
return, the team soundly defeated the Uni- 
versity of Maine, Central Connecticut, St. 
Johns, and URI and lost by a mere 4 points 
to BU. With only one dual meet left, the 
Lady Eagles face U Conn, Both team share 
an impressive 6-0 record in New England 
swimming. 




The lady Eagles 

display 

determination as 

they ace to 

victory. 



114 Women's Swimming 




Women's Swimming 115 



^ 



SpJisK#Splash 








,ai!^:>- 



BC Finishes Strong 



ii4i!iii;,iiB<sS2 



Mary Manion 



This freestyle race comes down to the 

wire 



116 Men's Swimming 




This Eagle diver soars 
off the board with grace. 
Diving was an important 
key to the team's 
success. 



Mary Manion 



Men's Swimming 117 



Mary Manion 



Some members of the crew team pose for a 

shot 





Stroke of the Oar 



BC continues to build 



Only four years old, Boston College 
Crew has developed into a stable rowing 
program. With 60 rowers and 4 coaches, 
the team competes on both the novice 
and varsity levels. This year, with hard work 
and friends such as Mr. George Kiesewet- 
ter (SOM '53], the team finally acquired a 
boathouse to store equipment and racing 
shells. 

This fall they worked hard to further build 
the team. Two new coaches, John 
Ciovacco and Sue Foight, were busy co- 
ordinating the men's and women's novice 
programs and while Peter Ulrich and Dave 



Isenberg prepared the varsity teams for 
their fall "Head" races. 

Rowing 6 to 7 days per week, the rowers 
concentrated on improving their skill and 
speed. Seniors Kurt Weinsheimer and John 
Jones along with Captain Sean Knighten 
led the men's varsity squad into the fall 
competition. After racing in the "Head of 
the Connecticut" and the "Head of the 
Charles," the boat truly came together for 
an impressive race at the "Head of the 
Schykill" in Philadelphia. The women's var- 
sity eight, led by senior Melissa Davis and 
Captain Kate McCauley also rowed in the 
"Head of the Connecticut" and the "Head 
of the Schykill" and rowed especially well 
in the "Head of the Charles." Overall, it was 



a good season of racing and training for 
all of the programs. 

The seniors would like to thank their fac- 
ulty advisor Jeane Papilia, senior Dave 
O'Neill, coach Peter Ulrich, and and all the 
friends of BC crew for their unyielding sup- 
port. 



Crew 119 



QUICK STICKS 



The 1991 Eagie Lacrosse teai ^ 

pached by Ed Moy and assisted I^ 
oy David Currick and Reed Overly | ' 
completed a winning fall season, 1 
This spring, talent and uni^/ placed ■ 
this team on a level never before 
reached at the Heights. The offense ; 
led by Ail-American candidate ; 
Mark Gaffney, Colin McLane and 
Mark Wolfington presented scoring : 
threats from the midfield and > 
attack. Senior David Burns was I 
called upon to dominate the face- 
off s once again as well as provide 
solid defense from the midfield. On 
the same line was Senior Gary ; 
"Crab" Larkin who brought experi- l 
ence and excitement to the 1 
offense. The defense was led by I 
four year starter and All-New En- ■ 
gland candidate Senior tri-captain : 
Michael Holland who supplied.-: 
leadership and knowledge of the | 
game to the Eagles from his position | 
as the team's goaitender, The de- 1 
fense also returned three other 

starters from last year's squad, Mims dnc, , ^,^, .. ^,-. 

Senior tri-captain Rich St. Germain senior-led defense, Outstanc...., 
shut down some of the nation's top sophomores and freshmen provide 
attackmen. While Senior tri-captain ed quality depth as Boston College 
John Mahoney utilized his speed competed with the top teams ir 
and aggressive style to strip the ball nation with hopes for a playoff % 
from the opposing teams midfield- in May, 
ers. Two other returning players Jeff i 




'<i^^i^».<»» 



lis one 



is'^^^p^*^"^-- 



BJ5y^'i>/«-'<aJfc5CT«iggSl«syali 






Ahiive: An Eagle blow.s 

by a defender, 

penetrating the crease 

while rif;hl: BC seeks to 

gain control of the rock. 




120 Men's LaCrosse 




Pooling Energy 



The water polo team at BC is, as 
some may not know, is a NCAA Di- 
vision I varsity sport here at the 
Heights. The 1991 campaign for the 
Eagles was a tremendous success, 
Tri-captains Steve Dore, Alan 
Ueol<a, and Craig Jones led their 
team to the best finish in BC history, 



Competing against such teams 
as Army and BU, the Eagles finished 
the season in fourth place in New 
England, Besides the strong leader- 
ship and swimming of the three 
captains, BC was paced with the 
scoring prowess of junior Juan 
Giachino and Bob lacobucci and 



the solid defense of sophomore 
Randall Gilberd. 

Seniors Christos Zaharas and 
Peter Sullivan were also an impor- 
tant part in Coach Jerry Moss's 
team, providing experience as well 
as leadership. 



122 Water Polo 



High scoring Randall 
Gilberd (dark cap) 
fires another one past 
the Army goalie. 




1st row: L. 
Utterback. A. 
Ueoka, C. Jones, 
S. Dore, M. 
Leslie. 2nd row; 
M. Bums, B. 
locobucci, M. 
Kraaijvanger, C. 
Zaharos, J. 
Giachino. 3rd 
row: D. 
Corricello, P. 
Sullivan, M. 
Fitzloff, B. Yap, 
R. Gilbert, Coach 
Jerry Moss, S. 
Perlman. 4th row: 
D. Peterkoski, J. 
Kaauwai, A. 
Maher, Y. 
Tsukikawa, B. 
McCarthy. 



Senior Alan 
Ueoka prepares to 
unleash a rear 
back in a game 
against Army. 



Water Polo 123 



Hard Driving 

BC Shoots to Win 



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ifiti 









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124 Women's Basketball 




The 1991 season for the Lady Eagles' 
Dosketball program was like a roller- 
coaster ride. BC kicked off their season 
^ook third place in the competitive 
Arkansas Classic. The team then returned 
o the Northeast to defeat Dartmouth by 25 
Doints. After dropping their next two games 
o Holy Cross and Richmond, the Eagles 
von three straight over UNH and cross- 
own rivals Boston University and North- 
jostem. 

The Eagles then travelled to Purdue for 
he Boilermaker Classic, only to lose to 



Purdue and Northern Illinois, two nationally 
ranked teams. BC began their Big East 
schedule with a loss to Connecticut. How- 
ever, the hoopsters twice beat St. John's 
and Seton Hall, and came up with clutch 
victories over Villanova and Syracuse to 
finish 6-10 in the conference. 

The Eagles were guided by forward 
Sarah Behn, who lead the team with 668 
points, and an 89 percent free-throw per- 
centage. Center Carlo Wenger topped 
the team with 232 rebounds and 26 
blocked shots. Kerry Curran contributed 



138 assists at the guard position. Kelli Stahl 
was also a consistent player leading the 
team in points and rebounds in several 
games. Forward Stephanie Byrd, guard 
Jennifer Leddy, and Michelle Vertosky also 
contributed a great deal to the team. 

The Eagles played a tough schedule, in- 
cluding 19 games on the road and only 11 
at their home court at IVlcDonough Arena. 
They finished the season with 12 wins and 16 
losses. 




The Eagles work the ball around 
the horn 



Women's Basketball 125 



BC pushes the ball up the floor in 
one of their many fast breaks. 



Scoreboard 



!C 


74 


Arkansas 


iC 


85 


Miss. Valley 


iC 


79 


Dartmouth 


JC 


68 


Holy Cross 


)C 


51 


Richmond 


)C 


104 


UNH 


)C 


75 


BU 


iC 


66 


Northeastern 


iC 


76 


Purdue 


JC 


82 


N. Illinois 


JC 


67 


UConn 


JC 


70 


Hartford 


JC 


88 


St. John's 


JC 


72 


Providence 


JC 


75 


Syracuse 


JC 


54 


Villanova 


JC 


70 


Pitt 


JC 


70 


Georgetown 


JC 


87 


Seton Hall 


JC 


65 


UConn 


JC 


101 


St. John's 


JC 


68 


Providence 


JC 


57 


Syracuse 


3C 


54 


Villanova 


3C 


70 


Pitt 


3C 


74 


Georgetown 


3C 


76 


Seton Hall 


3C 


78 


Pitt (Big East 




'This year was a roller-coaster nde. 




all photos by Mary Manion 



126 Women's Basketball 




f 



u 




BC showed great accuracy from 
the line 



Women's Basketball 127 



Icing the Cake 



BC skates to another great year 



The men's hockey team began 
their season auspiciosly. At mid- 
season, the 20-6 Eagles lead 
Hockey East and were prepared to 
begin the final set of challenges 
that would return them to the Final 
Four in St. Paul, However, a series of 
disappointing losses in the Beanpot 
and Hockey East Tournament 
eclipsed an otherwise exciting and 
successful season. 

The Eagles maintained a high 
level of excitement at home in the 
Conte Forum. Building on last year's 
home record of 22-0, the Eagles 
finished up this season with a 17-3 
home record and a 27-12 (.692) 
record overall. 



Captain David Emma reserved a 
spot for himself in the record books 
this year with consistently outstand- 
ing play. He exceeded Scott 
Marlow's record of 200 career 
points by concluding the season 
with over 230 career points of his 
own. 

Captains Dave Pergola and Jeff 
O'Neil were supported by seniors 
John Reilly, Mark Dennehy, Sean 
Farley, Matt Glennon, and Sandy 
Galuppo. 

The team was lucky to be blessed 
with so much young talent. Juniors 
Marty Mclnnis, Steve Heinze, Scott 
LaGrand and sophomores Bill 
Guerin and Ted Crowley are 



among the most talented under- 
classmen and will anchor next 
year's team. 

The Eagles spent part of their 
Christmas break playing hockey in, 
of all places, Los Angeles. The team 
was invited to participate in the 
Great Western Freezeout Tourna- 
ment. The Eagles defeated the #1 
ranked team in the country, Minne- 
sota, in an impressive 3-2 victory. 

In what many consider to be his 
final year, coach Len Ceglarski 
finished his extraordinary career by 
leaving us with a Hockey East 
Championship and a legacy of 
superlative hockey. 






f 



Sandy Gallupo makes a spectacular 
save against BU at home. 


ITMBlWI.'R'WrS' 






After last year's third place finish in 
the nation, it isn't hard for the fans 
to display their spirit. 





XX 







Kristy Mathews 



Kristy Mathews 



Joe Cleary, known for his 
cannon-like shot and pinpoint 
accuracy, is shown here unleashing 
a blast in hopes of scoring a goal. 




Senior David Emma takes 
control as a Northeastern player 
loses control in the zone. 



130 Men's Hockey 



The HEM line, which 

accounted for a majority 

of the Eagles points, was 

not afraid to mix it up on 

the boards. 




Kristy Mathews 



Men's Hockey 131 




Mens Hockey 




Mens Hockey 1 i^ 



Eagle blueliner Mark "Jack" 

Dennehy shows his defensive skills 

as he pins a Husky attacker against 

the boards. 



Fiesty sophomore forward Bill 

Guerin finds the twine as he beats 

the NU goaltender with an accurate 

shot. 




Kristy Mathews 




134 Men's Hockey 



II 




Joe Crowley breaks up the play as he 
thwarts a Northeastern attack. 



Men's Hockey 135 




P;, Hockey 



^^^^^f^i^; 




Mens Hockey 137 



Doug Able soars over an 
opponent to stick the jay. 



138 Men's Basketball 





Men's Basketball 139 




140 Mens Basketball 




Supersub Willie "Fearless" Foley boxes out his 
opponent as he awaits the rebound. 



Mens Basketball 141 



Beasley gets off a short 
jumper in the lane 



142 Men's Basketball 





Eisley was effective in 
bringing the ball up and 
creating plays. 



Men's Basketball 143 



■"Hiu^^tf, 







A battle in the lane for a rebound 



Freshman Bill Curley, seen here crashing 
the boards, made an immediate impact this 
season. 



Lisa CarroU 



I) 









The Eagles relied on the sharpshooting of 
Malcolm Huckaby to power their offense. 



V 



144 Mens Basketball 




Mens Basketball 145 




all photos by Mary Manion 



Wrestling 147 




The BC field hockey team suf- 
fered a disappointing campaign in 
1990 due to injuries and inexperi- 
ence. Coach Sherren Granese 
guided the team to a record of four 
wins and fifteen losses. There were 
only three seniors on this team, two 
of which were out a good portion of 
the season due to injuries. At one 
point in the season, seniors Fay 
Gauthier and Erin Flarhety, both 
captains, were unable to play, 
leaving the team with very little ex- 
perience or leadership. 

In most of the games Coach 
Granese was forced to start six to 
seven freshmen and would only 
have one senior or junior on the field 
at one time. The future looks bright 
for these young Eagles as 19 players 
are returning next year, most of 
whom were given a lot of playing 



time. 

There were a few bright spots this 
season. Junior center-midfielder 
Joelle Kozma was named to the 
2nd team All-Region squad while 
Freshman sweeper Margaret Walsh 
was chosen as the Boston Four 
Rookie of the Year. Senior fonA/ard 
Kelly Taplan and Junior halfback 
Katie Forker also contributed 
greatly to the team. 

Coach Granese noted that to- 
wards the end of the season, the 
team seemed to come together 
and click because they started to 
gain both experience and confi- 
dence. Although the season may 
not have been the most successful 
in wins and losses, the Eagles 
gained the experience they will 
need to come out on top in the 
future. 



148 Field Hockey 



rii 




An Eagle storms the goal in 
an attempt to score 




"We had a young team" 
— Coach Granese 



BC Northwestern 

BC 4 Colgate 

BC 1 UMass 

BC 2 Holy Cross 

BC 1 Springfield 

BC BU 

BC Vlllanova 

BC 1 Providence (OT) 

BC 3 Dartmoutti 

BC Syracuse 

BC Brown 

BC Norttieastem 

BC 2 St. Louis 

BC 1 Duke 

BC UConn 

BC 1 Harvard 

BC 1 UNH 

BC Wm.&MarY 

BC 3 VCU 

Record: 4-15 



7 
3 
3 
6 
2 
5 
1 
2 

5 
1 

6 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 





Hustle like this made up for 
the lack of experience 



The Eagles take it in 



Field Hockey 149 



BIM)-ING AGREEMENT 



Skiiers keep their promise for a strong season 



The BC ski team led by co 
captains and seniors Katrina 
Lussi and Jim Bianchi are lool<- 
ing forward to a strong sl<i sea- 
son. The ski team consists of 20 
athletes from all over the 
country. The diversity of the 
team helps maintain a highly 
competitive spirit among the 
skiers. 

The men's team this year is 
strong. Jim Bianchi is skiing fast 
and the rest of the team has 
been following his lead. Senior 
Tom Cochran is back skiing 
with the Eagles after taking a 
year off from the slopes. Paul 
Santucci, member of the United 
States Disabled ski team, is 
keeping the team on its toes by 
skiing fast and working hard. 

The women's team is young 
and full of energy. Katrina Lussi 
is skiing well and hopes to lead 
the ladies to a successful, fun 
filled season. 

The Eagles hope to fly to Or- 
egon in March for the National 
Collegiate Ski Association Na- 
tional Championships. The 
team hopes to be skiing at their 
best against the competition. 
They have fared well at the na- 
tionals in the past and hope to 
have yet another successful 
season. 



150 Skiing 




Senior Katrina Lussi flies down the 
mountain in a slalom race. Katrina 
also competes in the freestyle event 
and hopes to join the U.S. Olympic 
team. 





Senior Jim Bianchi has 
been a consistently 
strong skiier for four 
years at the Heights. 



Paul Santucci, a senior, 
makes a tight turn 
around the pole. Paul is 
a member of the U.S. 
disabled ski team. 



Skiing 151 



wing 

The Mens Tennis team deans house as it dominates the Big Jast again. 





BC returns with a smashing 
backhand. 




Scoreboard oM* 



September 11 at BU 7-2 W 
September 14-16 Big East W 
September 25 
Central Connecticut 5-4 W 
October 9 IVIIT 7-2 W 




"We had a great season' 



— Gil Daley 



Mens Tennis 153 




In Full Swing 



~^: 



Boys of Summer Dominate the Diamond 



Kristy Matthews 



The 1990-91 baseball team is 
looking forward to their spring sea- 
son. Led by Co-Captains Brian 
Kelley (2B) and Doug MacNeil (P) 
the team hopes to improve their fifth 
place finish in only the second year 
of a united Big East Conference. 

A strong nucleus returns from last 
year's squad. A powerful offense re- 
turns 6 starters including senior Tom 
Logan [IB], Chris Taylor (3B) Andy 
Brown, Derek Fergus, Joe Hay ward 
and freshman infielder IVIike IVIartin. 

Their strength is augmented by a 



talented pitching staff. Captain 
Doug MacNeil, a powerful righty 
starter Is joined by hurlers Chris 
Higgins, Brian Looney, Chris Giam- 
sante, and John Fitzgerald. 

They will train for the upcoming 
season at the Royals facility in Base- 
ball City, Florida over spring break. 
A tournament in Florida will hope- 
fully prepare the Eagles to defeat 
perennial powerhouses UConn, 
Seton Hall, and Villanova and de- 
fend their Beanpot trophy, played 
at Fenway Park. 



154 Baseball 




A BC baserunner makes it 
safely back to first after a 
pick-off attempt. 



The man on the mound takes 
in the signals in preparation 
for the pitch. 



Baseball 155 



We bid Farewell to . . . 



William J. Flynn 



Thoreau said that an institu- 
tion is the lengthened shadow 
of a single man, The institution is 
Boston College Athletics, the 
man is William J. Flynn, IVIr. 
Flynn's years of dedication are 
indelibly marked on all that is 
BC athletics. The BC commu- 
nity sadly says Good Bye to 
William J, Flynn, who is retiring 
after 24 years as Athletic Direc- 
tor at the Heights. 

Bill graduated from Boston 
College in 1939, following an 
outstanding academic and 
athletic career which earned 
him nine varsity letters on the 
football field, hockey rink, and 
baseball diamond. 

Bill returned to BC in 1945, as 
a professor of mathematics. In 
1952, he became Executive 
Secretary of the Alumni Associ- 
ation, and still found time to be 
an assistant football coach 
under Denny Myers and Mike 
Holovak, On July 1, 1957, Mr. 
Flynn became BC Athletic Di- 
rector, 

In 1978, Bill was named to the 
Honors Court of the National 
Football Foundation and Hall 
of Fame and was selected as 
"Man of the Year" by the 
Gridiron Club of Boston, 



On January 10, 
1979, William Flynn 
was selected as the 
President of the 
NCAA, only the sec- 
ond AD to ever hold 
the prestigious post. 

Under Bill's guid- 
ance. Alumni Sta- 
dium was relocat- 
ed and enlarged in 
1957, and was ex- 
panded another 
6,000 seats to its 
present capacity of 
32,000 in the sum- 
mer of 1971. Silvio O. 
Conte Forum, the 
university's new 
athletic and convo- 
cation center, which is home to 
the basketball and hockey 
teams, was completed in 1988. 
Most recently, he has overseen 
the reconstruction of the Jack 
Ryder Track and the installa- 
tion of the new scoreboard in 
Alumni. In addition, the Com- 
mander Shea baseball field 
and the since demolished 
McHugh Forum and Roberts 
Center, were all constructed 
under Bill's guidance. 

As a tribute to William Flynn, 
the multi purpose student rec- 




Mary Manion 



reation complex bears his 
name. Completed in 1972, the 
'Plex fills the need of every kind 
of athletic endeavor imagin- 
able — from basketball to 
handball to dance. 

William J, Flynn has given so 
much to the community, the 
school, and the world of col- 
lege athletics. He has success- 
fully navigated Boston College 
athletics to higher levels of ex- 
cellence each year he has 
been here. Good Luck Bill — 
you will be missed. 



156 Flynn 




Jack Bicknell 



On Tuesday, November 27, 
1990, Father Monan relieved 
Jack Bicknell as head football 
coach of the Boston College 
Eagles. Bill Flynn, Athletic 
Director, stated "It was a dif- 
ficult decision on the part of 
Boston College. Jack Bicknell 
has been a great represen- 
tative of Boston College and 
led our football teams to some 
of their most glorious moments 



Jack began his 
career at BC as an 
assistant coach 
from 1968 to 1975, 
under head coach 
Joe Yukica. From 
1976 to 1980, he was 
head coach of the 
University of Maine 
Black Bears where 
he amassed an 18- 
35 record. 

In 1981, he re- 
turned to the 
Heights as head 
coach, After a 5-6 
inaugural cam- 
paign in 1981, Jack 
led the 1982 Eagles 
to an 8-2-1 regular 
season record and 
a berth in the Tan- 
gerine Bowl (Florida 
Citrus] — BC's first 
post season bid in 
40 years, In 1983, a 
9-2 finish earned Bicknell's Ea- 
gles a trip to the Liberty Bowl to 
face Notre Dame, In 1984, Jack 
directed BC to its first New 
Year's Day appearance in 42 
years — the Cotton Bowl, A 
combination of injuries and 
lack of experience put the final 
1985 mark at 4-8, but the 
Eagles did play in the Kickoff 
Classic against reigning na- 
tional champion Brigham 
Young to inaugurate the 1985 



college football season, Bick- 
nell's Eagles bounced back in 
1986 with a sparkling 9-3 rec- 
ord, which was capped with a 
stunning 27-24 last minute vic- 
tory over the Georgia Bulldogs 
in the inaugural Hall of Fame 
Bowl in Tampa, Florida, After 
getting off to a slow start, the 
Eagles won 8 in a row to com- 
plete the season at 9-3. Seven 
BC opponents were selected 
for post season Bowl appear- 
ances in 1987, including four of 
those which participated in 
New Year's Day games. The 
Eagles also played against 
three of the five Heisman 
Trophy finalists including the 
eventual winner, Tim Brown of 
Notre Dame. Four opponents 
secured Bowl bids as the 
Eagles finished 3-8 in 1989, with 
three of those teams playing on 
New Year's Day, Last year, the 
Eagles fell to a 2-9 mark, but 
five of those losses were by a 
total of fourteen points, 

In ten years as head football 
coach of the Eagles, Bicknell 
posted a record of 59 wins, 55 
losses and 1 tie, 

Tuesday was a quiet day 
around the Heights, Football 
players, fans, and administra- 
tion felt the loss not only of a 
good coach, but a good man 
who earned the respect of all 
who knew him. 



Bicknell 157 




Student Life 



Once again, Boston College students hiave been 
faced with a year of tremendous chiange, Both 
changes in Boston College (such as a new Chem- 
istry building and a new registration system) and 
changes in the world (the ending of the Cold War 
and the beginning of a war in the Middle East) have 
affected everyone here, While these changes 
have evoked various responses among Boston 
College students, each student, in his or her own 
way, has played an important part in redefining 
traditions. 



Student Life 159 



(Slgnattan ^tuv 



In honor of the 450th anniver- 
sary of the founding of the 
Society of Jesus, by St, Ignatius, 
the residents of Boston College 
participated in various cer- 
emonies and celebrations. In 
September, Hillsides A & B was 
renamed as Ignacio Hall, in 
memory of the six Jesuits killed 
in El Salvador last year. After 
the dedication, a Mass of the 
Holy Spirit took place in O'Neill 
Plaza. It was attended by hun- 
dreds. Other events in honor of 
this anniversary were planned 
throughout the year, such as 
special masses and an opera. 






160 Ignatian Year 















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Ignatian Year 161 



9? 



;\'< 



vv 



In rain, in sun, or any 
otl^er type of weather, Bos- 
ton College spirit never fal- 
ters. 

At football games and 
other sporting events, the 
spirit is evident as students 
and alumni cheer on the 
Eagles. Displays of B.C. 
spirit are not limited to 
games, but are present in 
all aspects of B.C. life. 
Students are proud to be 
going to B.C.; alumni are 
proud to call themselves 
B.C. graduates; and even 
youngsters long to be a 
part of Boston College . . . 

It looks like B.C. spirit will 
never die! 



162 Spirit 




all photos by Maiy Manion 




THIS IS YOUR BRAIN 



TfflS IS YOUR ^UWK 




Spirit 163 




164 Spirit 




r ^ " ^ ^; \ 



Mary Manion 



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The friends you make in 
college are supposed to 
be the friends you keep for 
the rest of your life. If you 
ask a Boston College stu- 
dent, he or she will most 
fikely agree! 

At Boston College, it is 
fasy to find friends that 
share the same likes and 
interests as you, such as 
just hanging out or cook- 
ing a pig over an open fire. 
Each person has some 
unique characteristics, 
which often are revealed 
in the presence of friends. 
Therefore, don't friends 
tend to reflect our own per- 
sonalities? 



'f^^- Friends 





Friends 167 



H^ 






On Sunday, October 21, 
crew teams from all over 
the country competed in 
the annual Head of the 
Charles competition. 
Spectators crowded the 
banks of the Charles River 
to view the races and to 
take advantage of the 
perfect autumn weather. 
B.C.'s own men and 
women's teams compet- 
ed in the early morning 
club races and finished 
extremely well. 

Head of the Charles will 
always one of Boston's 
most favorite traditions, an 
event not only for athletes 
to enjoy. 



Maryrochelle Te 




Mary Manion 



168 Head of the Charles 




Head of the Charles 169 



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From the rusts and golds 
of autumn, to the greens 
and roses of spring, Boston 
College's campus is alive 
with color. Going to school 
in the Northeast, we all are 
witnesses to the season's 
changes, seeing each 
one's special beauty . . . 




170 Seasons 




Mary Manion 



Seasons 171 



1^^ 



Despite Boston Col- 
lege's busy campus, you 
can always find a place to 
spend some time in peace- 
ful pursuits, such as study- 
ing in solitude or having a 
heart-to-heart conversa- 
tion with a close friend. 
B.C. contains many of 
these quiet places, and in 
the middle of a hectic life, 
you can always find time 
to enjoy a sunny afternoon. 




all photos by Becky Hiltunen 



172 Quiet Places 




Quiet Places 173 



^ 







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the Dance 



Homecoming weekend is 
happily anticipated by stu- 
dents and alumni alike. Not 
only is there the big Homecom- 
ing football game, but many 
other events as well, 

The most popular Home- 
coming tradition was once 
again the annual Homecom- 
ing Ball, sponsored by UGBC. 
This year, the semi-formal was 
a huge success. The ball was 
held at the Sheraton Towers 
Hotel in Boston, and was at- 
tended by over a thousand 
smiling students, 

UGBC also planned events 
for this year's Homecoming 
weekend. The Sunday Brunch 
was also a success, and hope- 
fully the start of a very rich tradi- 
tion. 



174 Homecoming Dance 





Homecoming Dance 175 




^ If* Homecoming Dance 




Homecoming Dance 177 



For the first time ever, 
^UGBC sponsored a brunch 
on tt^e morning of tfie Home- 
coming football game. 
McElroy Dining Hall was 
transformed into a culinary 
paradise . . . 




Im 



178 Homecoming Brunch 



jb. 




all photos by Marion Manion 



HOMECOMIWr. 





w 




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An ice sculpture in McElroy? What next — caviar 
and champagne? 



Homecoming Brunch 179 



^^^ 



Indeed one of Boston Col- 
lege's greatest prides is its 
campus. The co-existing 
Gothic and newer archi- 
tectural styles create a 
perfect blend between 
tradition and the present. 
This atmosphere is not only 
perfect for studying and 
social interacting, but for 
just plain thinking as well. 



180 Campus 





all photos by Mary Manion 



Campus 181 



piYV 



lYV^ 



Choices of dining at B.C. 
seem endless, B.C. offers 
traditonal cafeteria fare 
[McElroy, Walsh, Stuart 
Hall], junk food (Lyons, 
the Club), a convenience 
store in Walsh, and a res- 
taurant (the Golden Lan- 
tern). Eating at college, 
while necessary, is more a 
social than anything else. 



182 Dining 





Dining 183 



r^\\t 



p\e^ 



Whether it be aerobics, 
tennis, swimming, or 
basl<etball, Boston Col- 
lege's William Flynn Sports 
Complex is the place to 
be. With the fitness craze of 
the 1980's spilling into this 
decade, the "plex" has re- 
mained ever-popular. 



184 The Plex 





The Plex 185 



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Student 
Center 



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Mary Rochelle Te 



186 McElroy 



Cheryl Simraoy 




New entrance to the Book Store. 



McElroy 187 






Chiswick. Sutherland, 
South Street. These are just 
a few of the Off-Campus 
areas in which B.C. stu- 
dents reside. The majority 
of juniors live off-campus, 
but students from all 
classes live away from the 
confines of B.C., enjoying 
the freedom and the noto- 
rious parties. 



188 Off-Campus 





Off-Campus parties 189 



Vla^S 



qvX^ 



Wherever food or drink is 
available, you are 
bound to find a B.C. stu- 
dent nearby. The list of 
favorite B.C. hangouts is 
infinite, but here is a 
sampling of some of the 
most traditional spots. 



190 Hangouts 



photos by Mike Dolan 





/ 



\ 




-oUeen Hasey 



Hangouts 191 




U-Dial is the new registra- 
tion system adopted by 
B.C. Students dial a 
number on tlie pinone, and 
by pressing the correct 
numbers, can register and 
drop/add classes. Kristin 
Wolf demonstrates this 
process . . . (photos by 
Mary Manion) 



U> 



ial 

Is BACK 



The U-DiAL system is 
available for drop/add 
until 4:00 p.m. Friday, 
January 18. 

Call 




192 U-Dial 



iJJtt ■ 



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Kristin phones U-Dial. 







The class she wants is closed! Frustration begins . . . 




After pressing the correct numbers for the class she wants, Kristin anticipates 

the worst . . . 




Override Time 



"I've had it!" Kristin mutters, slamming the phone receiver. 



U-Dial 193 



/> 



Best Buddies is a example 
of the caring and commit- 
ment of B.C. students. Es- 
tablished this year at B.C., 
Best Buddies is a program 
to provide opportunities 
for college students and 
special needs individuals 
to become friends, and 
planned activities such as 
the successful holiday 
party encourage these 
friendships to grow. 
Everyone a part of this pro- 
gram agrees that it was an 
unforgettable experience, 
and looks forward to con- 
tinuation of Best Buddies 
here at B.C. We thank Best 
Buddies, and other service 
volunteers, for bringing 
more love into this world. 




194 Best Buddies 




Best Buddies 195 



;> 



Parents' Weekend is a 
chance for parents not just 
to visit with their children 
but to see what exactly 
their children have been 
"up to." This year, parents 
were invited to sit in on 
classes, listen to school 
speakers, and attend a 
special dinner which 
showcased various Boston 
College entertainment. 
Parents enjoyed them- 
selves and this opportunity 
to view Boston College life, 
and to perhaps remember 
their own college expe- 
riences. 



196 Parents' Weekend 





Parents' Weekend 197 



C\vn-i 



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Despite finals and end-of- 
sennester cinaos, tl^e Clirist- 
mas spirit still finds its way 
to the Boston College 
campus. Decorations pop 
up everywhere, from dorm 
rooms to offices. Most sym- 
bolic of the holiday season 
is the traditional lighting of 
the evergreen in O'Neill 
plaza, which is attended 
by hundreds, who join to- 
gether for a night of carol- 
ing and friendship. 



198 Christmas 





Christmas 199 






G^ 



ests 



Among speakers and 
entertainers brought to 
campus were Massa- 
chusetts senator, John 
Kerry, and comedian, 
Barry Sobel. John Kerry's 
lecture on affairs in the 
Middle East was co- 
sponsored by UGBC and 
B.C. Democrats, Shortly 
after. Senator Kerry won re- 
election. Barry Sobel, an 
upcoming comedian, 
was sponsored by UGBC 
Pub Series and was well- 
attended by a responsive 
B.C. crowd. 




' < < ri >t> in > w>"mww * 



,-Oi j mw"" . 



Senator John Kerry 



200 Guests 



i 



Comedian 




And . . 



Guests 201 



Time Capsule Tour 




202 10,000 Maniacs 




All photos by Mike Dolan 



10,000 Maniacs 203 



CO 



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Once again, UGBC suc- 
ceeded in providing a 
wide range of musical 
performances to the BC 
students. Among them in- 
cluded local Livingston 
Taylor, and the off-beat 
band "The Nerds", both 
performing in the Rat as 
part of the Pub Series. And 
the group 10,000 Maniacs 
had an electrifying per- 
formance in Conte Forum. 




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all photos by Mary Manion 



Concerts 205 



Peopl e . . . 




Can you find: Father Cool, Father Pensive, Father Sleepy and Father I.C.U. Taking — this 
photo? 




Will the real Matilda Wilhemina Dipplehopper please identify herself? 



206 People 




I want to fly! I want to FLY!" 



"Whoa! Look at that guy with 
the crutches!" 



People 207 




208 For Boston 



For Boston 

For Boston, For Boston, 

We sing our proud 

refrain! 
For Boston, For Boston, 

Tis Wisdom's eartlily 

reign. 
For liere all are one 

and their hearts sing 

true. 
And the towers on the 

Heights reaoh to 

Heav'n's own blue. 
For Boston, For Boston, 
the echoes ring 

again! 




For Boston 209 




MOVIES 

1. Dances With 
Wolves 

2. Pretty Woman 

3. Misery 

4. Total Recall 

5. Edward 
Scissorhands 

6. Ghost 




TV SHOWS 

1. The Simpsons 

2. Twin Peaks 

3. Cheers 

4. In Living Colour 

5. L.A. Law 

6. Thirtysomething 



210 Looking Back 



1 i 


1 






KfM:%..- 




m 


W -; .., 



SINGERS 



2, 
3. 



Madonna 
Sinead O'Connor 
Phil Collins 



4. Janet Jackson 



5. 



M.C, Hammer 
2 Live Crew 



AREWELL 

Jim Henson 
. Sammy Davis Jr. 
. Leonard Bernstein 
. Stevie Ray 

Vaughn 
. Pal Bailey 
. Greta Garbo 



LOOKING BACK AT 

1990-91 



ACTRESSES 

1. Julia Roberts 

2. Michelle Pfeifer 

3. Demi Moore 

4. Whoopi Goldberg 

5. Kathy Bates 

6. Wynona Ryder 





212 Perspectives 



.ilillll! 




Perspectives 

When apprehensive high school graduates are 
preparing to embarl< on their college careers, they 
are often given a very helpful piece of advice - 
"Don't vy/orry. . . there are so many different types of 
people at a college, everyone fits in." This is true as 
well at Boston Colelge, where our diverse faculty 
and student population is continually redefining 
tradition . With members of our student body ranging 
from politically conservative to liberal and from 
mathematically calculating to artistically creative, 
every individual each leaves us with a slightly differ- 
ent impression. While it is impossible to recognize 
each member individually, this section gives us a 
sampling of the variety of B.C.'s unique perspec- 
tives. 



Perspectives 213 



Patrick Moran, a double major in 
History and Political Science in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, is Boston 
College's unsung |-iero. Pat played some 
of the most important roles on the BC 
campus, and he deserves recognition. 
Yet praise isn't what's important to Pat — 
for Boston College gave him "the op- 
portunity to set high, realistic goals and 
the confidence to achieve these goals. " 

Freshman year, Pat was some- 
what hesitant about going to Boston 
College. Even before he had reached 
the campus, he had decided that he 
was going to transfer. However, when 
Pat became President of Greycliff and 
made it one of the most active buildings 
on campus, his attitude changed com- 
pletely. "Being President of Greycliff had 
a serious impact on my attitude Freshman 
year — it helped me to realize that I had 
something to offer BC," he explains. 

In addition, Pat was a member of 
the BC Marching Band and an active 
participant in the International Club as a 
Delegate to the Harvard Model United 
Nations his Freshman year. 

His involvement with the Interna- 
tional Club continued into his Sophomore 
year when he was elected the Director 
of Academics and Head Delegate to 
the Harvard Model United Nations, a 
position in which he takes great pride. 
The year prior to his election, BC was 
dismissed from the UN conference and 
therefore did not receive any funding 
from the University. "I walked the cam- 
pus asking administrators for their support 
so we could go to the conference that 
year. Then I developed a training pro- 
gram and a selection process for the 
organization. We ended up winning two 
Best Delegate Awards." 

Pat managed his time well 
enough Sophomore year to become the 
first Executive Treasurer of the Residence 
Hall Council (RHC). Pat, as one of RHC's 
founders, felt that he made a definite 
contribution to the organization. "RHC is 
still in its developing stages, but I do feel 
that 1 helped it to make a name for itself. " 

Pat's involvement with BC be- 
came even more intense Junior year 
when he continued as the International 
Club Director of Academics, became an 
RA in Greycliff and was elected as UGBC 
Vice President of Finance. "I take great 
pride in my finance position for UGBC . At 
first, 1 was a little intimidated because I 
was in charge of half a million dollars and 
because there was an $80,000 debt left 
for the new UGBC members to take care 
of," explains Pat. "We worked together 
to construct the first cohesive budget in 
UGBC history — a new standard was set 
for UGBC as well as the University." 

As a Senior, Pat held one of the 
most challenging positions on campus as 



Tatricl<i Moran 




UGBC Executive Vice President. "The 
day-to-day operation of UGBC is what's 
difficult — one department may run 
smoothly while another may need some 
guidance. Every day that I walk into the 
office, I never know what I'll be faced 
with." 

As Vice President, Pat plays the 
role of the unsung hero. "Of course 
people like to be recognized for their 
efforts, but when I ran for the position of 
Vice President, I knew I would always be 
behind the scenes," explains Pat. " I can't 
say that it bothers me, though. I ' m doing 
my job, that's what matters." 

Pat doesn't hesitate to say he 
loves BC. "It's given me the opportunity 
to develop my leadership skills and to 
become aware of the happenings on 



campus. 



"My e7(tracurricuCar activi- 
ties Have fiirtfiered my de- 
velopment as a human be- 
ing, in a tot of categories, in 
a tot of ways. Mil wanted 
to do was make a -positive 
impact on the students and 
tfie University. " 



%atherim Mc Morran 




Simply stated, the music of 
<atherine IVIclVlorran is beautiful. Kate, 
an English major with a concentration in 
south African Literature in the College of 
^rts and Sciences, has a true passion for 
Tiusic. Her relationship with music is one 
3f perfect harmony. 

Fervor and emotion exploded on 
stage when she performed the soothing 
/et intense music of the Boston College 
Church Folk Group or the exciting, jazzy 
■unes of BC bOp! 

"When I sing in the Folk Group, my 
amotions are difficult to explain," Kate 
;ays. "The music is so relaxing — it is truly 
sincere. If you are true to the music, the 
music will be true to you. I sing from my 



heart; this is when it comes out best." 

Kate felt that the relaxed nature 
of the Folk Group made it a powerful 
force during Mass. "I enjoy the Church 
Folk Group because we sing to have fun 
and praise God. There is no competition 
among us, and this is a great feeling," she 
says. "As Student Coordinator, I try to be 
democratic, it doesn't matter if a stu- 
dent doesn't have a great voice, be- 
cause in my opinion, everyone is a Lead- 
vocalist." 

Being a member of BC bOp! was 
a new and rewarding experience for 
Kate. " I never thought of singing this style 
of music , but I love it because it gives me 
a different type of release. It is fantastic 



music, and the group is remarkable." 

Freshman year, Kate was forced 
to choose between her passion for music 
and her love for athletics. Kate attended 
an Olympic camp for the discus and 
javelin throw, and she was planning on 
continuing her athletic pursuits at Boston 
College. "It was impossible to do both, so 
I chose music. Music has always been 
more important," Kate explains. 

Kate's genuine love for Boston 
College is obvious. "When 1 joined the 
church choir, I found my niche — I knew 
Boston College was the perfect school 
for me." 

Next year, Kate plans to teach 
English at a multi-racial school in South 
Africa. The desire to go to Africa stems 
from her family heritage; her mother is 
from South Africa . When Kate was young , 
she visited the country, and after this 
experience she always knew that she 
wanted to return. "South Africa is so 
interesting. When I went to visit my 
mother's family, I got a first-hand experi- 
ence of the black culture. Unfortunately, 
I had some horrendous encounters with 
racism, but these experiences really 
made me think, Now I feel that I have the 
opportunity to make a difference over 
there." 



"If you are true to the 

musicj the music zuiitbe 

true to you. I sing from 

my heart — this is when 

it comes out Best. " 



After her trip overseas, Kate plans 
to attend music school, but she has 
doubts if making music a profession is 
what she really wants. " I am worried that 
if I make music my job, it will become only 
an obligation and will not have the same 
impact on my life." 

Katherine McMorran — a truly sin- 
cere and passionate person — creates 
harmony in her life through her love of 
music and dedication to her personal 
values and traditions. 



Katherine McMorran 215 



(Dcrek^ McTfonaid 




Three Central Americari guerrilla wor- 
riers burst into the Boston College McElroy 
dining hall and seized an innocent student 
-- they tortured her and shot her in cold 
blood. The onlookers sat motionless. Ev- 
eryone was silent. This silence was just 
what Derek IVIcDonald wanted to hear, 
for he made students think. 

Derek, a Sociology major in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, is Coordinator 
of the Central American Network. He 
created this scene to enlighten students 
on the injustices which are occurring in 
Central America. His specific interest was 
the "disappearing" students in Central 
America, the innocent victims who are 
protesting against their government, "I 

216 Derek McDonald 



enjoy getting students to think about is- 
sues such as this," Derek says. "And I also 
like getting BC students involved in activi- 
ties on campus; it's great to see dedi- 
cated people." 

Derek's involvement with the BC com- 
munity did not stop here. He also was a 
member of the Environmental Action 
Center, the Coalition of Peace, IVIen 
Against Sexism , and the Student Advisory 
Committee for the Office of the Dean for 
Student Development. 

As a very enthusiastic Co-chair of the 
Appalachia Chaplaincy Program, Derek 
became more aware of his role in society. 
Appalachia is a Boston College volun- 
teer community service organization that 



focuses its work on five states: South 
Carolina, Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia 
and Maine. "Appalachia is so successful 
because we help people help them- 
selves," explains Derek. "We work with 
people, ratherthan do the workforthem." 

Derek reflects on some of his favorite 
Appalachia memories. "The long van 
trips to our placements ore great because 
everyone gets to know each other 
quickly. We are crammed into a small 
van and everyone becomes close 
friends." 

Another favorite memory took place 
on a Kentucky trip. Derek remembers 
sitting around a bonfire with students and 
placement residents "just telling stories 
and really listening to what each other 
had to say." 



"'T/te Boston CoiUgt com- 
munity encourages mc to 
tfiinl{^a6out ivfiat 1 6e- 
Cieve in; audit enables me 
to feet strongly, voice my 
opinions, take action, and 
make a difference 
on campus. " 



Although he believes some apathy 
does exist on the Boston College cam- 
pus, Derek used the lack of student in- 
volvement OS a catalyst for the imple- 
mentation of his own beliefs. "The BC 
community encourages me to think 
about what I believe in; and it enables 
me to feel strongly, voice my opinions, 
take action, and make a difference on 
campus." 

It is not surprising that after graduation , 
Derek plans to work for a volunteer orga- 
nization In Latin America. "Eventually I 
would like to set up my own volunteer 
organization. However, I am the type of 
person who likes to build on things - I like 
to take life one day at a time." 



Lisa Ccirroii 




Every morning she rises with the 
sun, peers out the window, and enjoys 
the beauty of the early moments of soli- 
tude. Some days she may simply observe 
the scenery outside behind the glass — 
other days she may not see it, being so 
completely immersed in her thoughts, 

Morning is Lisa's favorite time of 
the day for it is when she is at her best. " If 
I could, I would get up with the sun. I like 
beginnings. I like the light — it's always so 
bright and peaceful." 

Lisa Carroll is one of the six senior 
Fine Art majors at Boston College. She is 
a woman with an intense passion for art; 
it is her life and her love. "Without a 
doubt, art is the most important part of 
my life. It's the main thing that I'm all 
about." 

Her relationship with art began 
when she was very young. "When I was 
a little girl, my mother always signed me 
up for soccer and tennis lessons, and I 
always left after the first session. Then, 
when I was in third grade, I went to an arts 
and crafts class and I loved it." 

Lisa has matured quite a bit from 
her days of arts and crafts — she is a 
serious artist of the '90s. "My generation 
of artists believes it is important to paint 
honestly and to try to make people think 
about themselves and the world around 
them," she explains. "We are stubborn — 
so many artists make compromises just to 
make money. 1 may be an idealist, but I 
never want to compromise the truth within 
my painting." 



As Lisa matures as an artist, more 
and more of her soul emerges on can- 
vas. "I experience different cycles of 
exploration where I discover different 
parts of myself. And when the cycle is 
finished, 1 put my paintings on the wall 
and see how they work together to tell a 
story." 



"I ihin^my gzmration of 
artists Believes it is impor- 
tant to paint Honestfy and 
to reaUy maf:^ -people 
tfiink^about themselves 
and the world around 
them. " 



"I first began painting simple things 
when I was trying to get just the compo- 
sition and color down; then my thoughts 
matured and my energy became stron- 
ger. I began painting more complicated, 
more abstract forms — at this point I'm 



concentrating on totems and spirits, a 
sort of dream world," she says. 

Lisa's fascination with nature is 
mirrored in her work. "I'm really con- 
nected with nature. Everyone has some- 
thing they believe in — I believe in nature. 
It is something within nature that I am 
drawn to, whether it is the softness of a 
flower or the roughness of the bark of a 
tree." 

An onlooker may wonder how 
Lisa captures her intense emotions, only 
to set them free through a juxtaposition 
of brush strokes. "Ideas sometimes jump 
out at me; when this happens I have to 
have my sketch book with me to catch it. 
I am very aware of everything around 
me — colors, shapes, expressions." 

And when Lisa is inspired, she 
paints and paints and paints. "I run to my 
studio and start painting. At first, I ploy 
around with a drawing or just throw my 
idea on canvas," she explains. "I tip-toe 
around the studio — I take a step back 
and then work into a trance. The more I 
paint, the more frenzied I get and the 
more energy I feel coming to the sur- 
face." 

Fire, faces and masks seem to be 
an obsession with Lisa. "I just can't keep 
fire out of my paintings. It isn't an image 
of bright flames, but instead an energy or 
a power," she says. "I am endlessly in- 
trigued by faces and masks — there'sjust 
something that draws me to them. I'm 
not quite sure what I feel about them, all 
I know is that I have to get them into my 
paintings," 

Lisa does not only express herself 
through her paintings, but also through 
her writing. She believes it helps her with 
her creativeness and expression — 
whether it be journal, prose or fiction. 

Indeed Lisa Carroll is a strong indi- 
vidual, with a talent for creativity, a pas- 
sion for nature and a desire for honesty. 
And in her studio, surrounded by her 
thoughts, she enters a dimension of 
imagination and power. 

The moon came closer 
And I changed 
Along the moon's path 
And at its closest point 
The spirit I embodied 
Not dolphin 
But hawk, 

True, the playful spirit remains 
swimming inside my soul 
But now the hawk flies stronger. 

— Lisa Carroll 



Lisa Carroll 217 



Andrziv J^asper 




"If I wrote out a questionnaire and 
sent it to Boston College students and 
alumni asking what contribution Political 
Science major Andrew Kasper made 
during his years at the Heights, how many 
people would answer correctly? Not 
many," 

Who would have guessed that 
for three consecutive years, Andrew 
Kasper was the Clark Kent behind that 
lively, loyal and lovable mascot we af- 
fectionately call "The Eagle"? Finally, the 
veil has been lifted, spoiling the best kept 
secret on campus and allowing Andrew 
to receive the recognition he deserves. 

"Keeping the Eagle's identity a 
mystery made it much more fun," laughs 



Andrew who, stripped of his costume, 
stands only about 5' 11" and weighs 
roughly 165 pounds. 

But from the beginning Andrew 
knew that becoming BC's Big Bird was no 
easy task, especially since it was all-vol- 
unteer work, i.e. no scholarship. Still, he 
made it a point to always become in- 
volved in charity work, like "The Festival of 
Friendship" or birthday and graduation 
parties for kids of all ages. 

We're probably mostfamiliar with 
his bird-brained antics during football and 
basketball games. Who could forget the 
Eagle racing across the field during 
football games in order to get in his share 
of push-ups or coming within inches of 



making each of his over-the-head shots 
during basketball half-times? How about 
all the zany stunts he pulled while de- 
fending our honor against those ruthless 
mascots from visiting schools? 

"There's this unwritten rule that 
the home team's mascot wins all of the 
battles — but the old Syracuse 
Orangeman used to try to get all the 
attention. Whenever we'd play them, 
he'd plot against me. I'd feel like an 
endangered species out there, if you 
can believe that." 

For the most part, though, Andrew 
notes that the other mascots weren't 
"ruthless" at all. Intact, he said they were 
hilarious to watch and to work with. He 
learned the most by mimicking the other 
characters, especially ones as insane as 
the Louisville Cardinal and the Miami Isbis. 

One experience that stood out in 
Andrew's mind as being particularly en- 
joyable was when he traveled with the 
football team to Dublin, Ireland, in his 
Sophomore year. "The Irish seemed to 
love the trip almost more than we did. 
We walked in a parade, and they acted 
like they'd never seen anything like it 
before," says Andrew. "It's weird because 
if I jogged around the reservoir once, I'd 
be dead, but when I put on the suit 
someone else takes over. That parade 
was about four miles long and I spent the 
whole time running around going nuts, 
but I never got the least bit tired." 

Another highlight Andrew men- 
tions was his stardom on The Today Show, 
along with the Purdue Boilermaker and 
the NC State Wolfette. "For the first time 
we were able to talk about all the funny 
things that happen to us in public, but, of 
course, we had to keep our masks on," 

So after three years on the job, 
will Andrew miss being able to dress up 
and come alive inside the suit of maroon, 
white and gold? "I will definitely miss it, 
but three years is a long time — I'm 
getting a little burnt out in this last year." 

"Overall, though, it is a great ex- 
perience that I would gladly do all over 
again . From here I 'd like to go into Adver- 
tising or Sales, but that doesn't mean I'd 
rule out a career as a professional mas- 
cot. The San Diego Chicken makes about 
$370,000 a year, while someone like the 
Miami Hurricanes' mascot earns about 
$50,000. I couldn't really call it a job, but 
for that kind of money who could resist?" 

"Whenever we 'd-pCay them, 

he 'dpCot against me. I 'dfeel 

tike an endangered species out 

there, if you can believe that, | 



218 Andrew Kasper 



'Eri(<i WeilienmM^€r 




On the second floor of O'Nei 
ibrary there's a fascinating rooin few BC 
itudents l<now about. It's a facility for the 
DJind members of the BC community, 
which houses, among other things, a 
iophisticated voice-synthesized word 
processing system. It is here that Erik 
A/eihenmayer spent a good deal of time 
during his four years at BC. Learning how 
o use the system effectively is just one 
sxample of the ways in which Erik has 
nonaged to work around apparent ob- 
;tacles in order to achieve whatever goal 
^e desires. 

"There's nothing really special 
about me," says Erik. "Some people think 
hat sight is the end all. It's not. I still do 



what I want to do. I just direct my interests 
toward things I know I can do." 

Erik came to BC without any prior 
knowledge of how to get around the 
campus. Through trial and error, it took 
him roughly a week or two to get it all 
down pot, including getting to class on 
time. "I really don't have a set pattern. I 
just try to visualize areas like the campus 
from on overhead or "bird's-eye" view. 
You basically learn to judge distances 
using different clues and landmarks. Plus, 
I get a lot of help from Wizard." 

Erik and his guide dog have been 
together since high school. Remarkably, 
it took only two weeks for Erik to feel 
comfortable with Wizard, However, he 



emphasizes that their relationship is a 
growing processthat continues each day 
as he learns more about the dog. 

Although Wizard goes just about 
everywhere with Erik, one place he can- 
not go is out on the slopes of New 
England's ski resorts. Though Erik just 
started skiing last year, he picked it up 
rather quickly. As for how he manages, 
hejust has a friend ski behind him and yell 
basic commands like "left" or "right" and 
lets his natural athleticism take core of 
the rest. 

Another place that Wizard can- 
not accompany Erik is under the depths 
of the Atlantic Ocean where he has just 
completed a nine-week scuba diving 
training course. Only about six of the 
eighteen people in the course braved 
the course's final dive — among that 
group of six was Erik. 

Finally, you won't find Wizard on 
one of Erik's unique family trips. "My dad 
is sort of a middle-aged Indiana Jones. I 
feel really grateful that he's never shel- 
tered or protected me in any way. Along 
with the rest of the family, he's always 
been supportive, and we've had some 
great experiences." 

Erik'sfamily excursions have taken 
him practically all over the globe, from 
hiking an Inca trail in Peru, to visiting one 
ofthe most primitive societies in the world, 
a small group of villages in the mountains 
of Indonesia. 

"One ofthe most frustrating things 
about the hiking trips is not being able to 
judge how for you have to go. But my 
dad solved the problem by breaking 
down the trail into sections. In a way it's 
like life, where you never really go for the 
huge goals, but instead advance one 
step at a time and learn to gauge your- 
self. 

As a Communication and English 
major in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, Erik has completed his first 
screenplay and is working on his second 
one. "It's something that I started for a 
class and then just continued with on my 
own. I describe scenes from memory since 
I lost my sight when I was thirteen. I'd love 
to do it as a profession, in fact it's my 
highest goal." 

"Some peopCe tftinl^^tftat sigHt 

is tfie end ail. It 's not. I stilt 

do what I want to do; I just 

direct my interests toward 

things I Iqiow I can do. " 

Erik Welhenmayer 219 



Lysette Burgos 




Lysette Burgos is a classy lady — 
she's got style, on stage and off. 

Lysette — a double major in politi- 
cal science and sociology — was one of 
the founders of the People's Performing 
Arts Company, a group that was first 
creoted in 1989 by the students who 
performed in the AHANA production of 
Don'tYouWanttoBeFree, "We decided 
that there was a great need to promote 
intercultural awareness on the campus," 
she explains. 

Though a young organization , the 
People's Performing Arts Company was 
successful with its performances in the 
past two years. Lysette, who was the 
company's 1 989 vice-president, directed 
and acted in some of the fall perfor- 
mances such as Irving and Portraits of 
Women . In addition, the company, with 
the help of UGBC, was responsible for 
bringing the renowned speal<er, Maya 
Angelou, to campus. 

Last spring Lysette co-produced 
a South-African production, "Statements 
After An Arrest Under the Immorality Act." 

220 Lysette Burgos 



She also co-directed and acted in the 
show, "The English Only Restaurant. And 
this year, with Lysette as President, the 
company brought an Afro-Caribbean 
musical group to campus. 

Lysette describes her relationship 
with theater; " I find acting to be an outlet 
for expression and an avenue for escape 
— it gives me the opportunity to commu- 
nicate freely." 

Directing, however, was "quite 
challenging" for Lysette. "It is difficult 
because I sometimes find myself creat- 
ing a grand vision of what I want to 
happen on stage, and if it doesn't work, 
lgetveryfrustrated,"sheexplains. "When 
I am directing, I always have to be quick 
on my feet and in control, even when I'm 
not. Being secure at all times is what is 
absolutely necessary — it is critical to 
always have alternatives to fall back on. " 

Yet Lysette believes that the sense 
of accomplishment as a director was 
worth all of the hardships that she en- 
countered. "It (directing) gives me 
control over the actors' expressions. My 



job is complete when I successfully focus 
the performers' energy and create 
something that works, something con- 
crete, " she explains. 

Lysette ' s passion for success does 
not stop when she walks off stage, how- 
ever. Lysette was a member of the Voices 
of Imani throughout her college career. 
As a "conservative Catholic," Voices of 
Imani gave her not only the opportunity 
to sing but also to "explore other religious 
traditions." 



"I find acting to 6e an 
outUtfor e?(pression and 
an avenue for escape — 
it gives me the o-p-portu- 

nity to communicate 
freeiy. " 



As a member of the ODSD Advi- 
sory Committee, Lysette had a direct 
impact on the Boston College student 
body. "In our meetings we discuss spe- 
cific concerns of the student body and a 
wide range of campus issues — one for 
example is the new alcohol policy." 

Lysette continued her impact on 
the Boston College community through 
her involvement with the Martin Luther 
King Discussion Series Board, an organi- 
zation that discusses the intercultural pro- 
gramming on campus. 

Indeed Lysette's intense involve- 
ment with the Boston College campus is 
quite impressive; but her dedication off 
campus at the Juvenile Probation Office 
in Quincy, Massachusetts is equally as 
admirable. Acting as a supervisor to 
juvenile offenders, Lysette heard a 
juvenile's cose and then proceeded to 
work directly with school officers, police, 
parents, and judges. 

"Sometimes the job can be frus- 
trating because I see the same kids over 
and over again. Yet when I see one of 
the kids succeed through the process of 
the justice system, the job becomes re- 
warding." 

It is obvious that Lysette Burgos is 
a vital, compassionate individual with a 
strong sense of who she is and what she 
believes in. Whether in or out of the 
spotlight she performs with dignity. 



[0^ Fernandez 




It's always interesting to find out 
how people get nicknamed. Actually, 
"get" is the wrong word since you don't 
get nicknames, you earn them. Rob 
Fernandez earned his one night while 
partying in a friend's dorm room fresh- 
man year, when he was suddenly 
handed the phone. Barely audible on 
the other line was his friend's father. 
"Where's my son?" asked the father. 
"Who am I talking to?" 

"I remember saying the first thing 
that popped into my mind — "Joe 
Rodriguez' — and the name has stuck 
ever since." 

This episode is characteristic of a 
freshman year during which Joe ... or eh 
... Rob had his share of new experiences, 
as do all college freshmen. "Freshman 



year was a really fun year for me, but 
coming from a small public high school I 
was a little blown away at first by the size 
of BC. Academically, I was forced to 
learn how to study all over again — so- 
cially, I made a ton of great friends that 
I'm still close to." 

In a sense, freshman year was the 
beginning of an evolutionary process for 
Rob. He describes college as a critical 
time when students really develop 
themselves. And as he matured through 
his four years at BC one basic theme kept 
coming up — his desire to help others, 
particularly freshmen. 

Entering his sophomore year he 
was commander-in-chief of the Freshmen 
Orientation Program. As coordinator, he 
was responsible for organizing the 



program's events and managing the 
entire group of freshmen assistants. What 
stood out most in his mind was the expe- 
rience of seeing himself in the freshmen 
he worked with. 

His role as Coordinator of the 
Freshmen Orientation Program also 
functioned as a stepping stone to his 
position junior year as UGBC Director of 
Programming. As programmer, Rob was 
one of the main students responsible for 
the 1989 Homecoming dance. He also 
played an instrumental role in getting 
Ziggy IVlarley to sing at BC. 

Aside from his work with UGBC, Rob's 
greatest contribution junior year was to 
the freshmen of Duschene residence hall 
on Newton Campus where he was an 
RA. "Junioryearwas probably my favorite 
year at BC because I developed so much 
as a person. 1 learned about myself and 
how to deal with people in crisis situa- 
tions. However, it did take a while for me 
to discover the balance between disci- 
plinarian and friend." 



It 5 normaC tofeef tfie 

pressure that coitege can 

create, but you should 

never let that pressure 

prevent you from doing 

your best. 



Equality and fairness are two issues 
that Rob takes very seriously, notjust when 
dealing with freshmen, but in all aspects 
of life. He feels that a lot more needs to 
be done to make BC's student body and 
faculty more ethnically diverse. He feels 
that "diversity in college is invaluable 
since it teaches students to learn how to 
tolerate and accept other types of 
people and behavior." 

Fernandez brought such an attitude 
into his senior year as SA of Keyes South, 
also on Newton campus. In addition, 
Rob continued his involvement with UGBC 
as RA coordinator by making sure the 
resident assistants are informed about all 
UGBC activities. 

As for advice for freshmen, Rob feels 
it is truly important "to make sure you let 
yourself develop by being open to the 
different opinions and influences around 
you ... It's normal to feel the pressure that 
college can create, but you should never 
let that pressure prevent you from doing 
your best." 



fakamisfia Patricia ^rown 




Professor Patricia Brown 
was named "Fahamisha" in 1969, 
at thie hieigtit of black student ac- 
tivism. "It was during thiis time of 
excitement and change, at a 
college whiich tiad just elected its 
first black administrator, wlnen a 
group of my students whio had just 
returned from studying in Tanza- 
nia gave me the name Fahamisha 
which means — one who causes 



under- 
stand- 
ing," she 
explains. 
"Getting 
this title is 
the most 
i m p o r- 
tantthing 
that has 
ever 
h a p - 
pened to 
me while 
teach- 
ing. I truly 
feel that I 
had an 
impact 
on these 
students." 

Fahamisha 
belongs 
to the 
Black 
Power 
Generation, a collection of the 
black community that — emerg- 
ing from a time of great activism 
— feel very strongly about their 
beliefs on racism. These activists 
fight their battle through scholarly 
wars. One way in which Professor 
Brown is winning this battle is 
through teaching in the Black 
Studies Program at Boston College, 
Although her base is here 



at Boston College, Fahamisha 
shares her literary ideas with stu- 
dents and colleagues at other 
Boston-area colleges and univer- 
sities such as the University of IVIas- 
sachusetts, Goddard-Combridge 
College, Harvard College, the 
John F. Kennedy School of Gov- 
ernment, Tufts University, MIT and 
Roxbury Community College. 



"Om who causes 
understanding " 



Her areas of expertise in- 
clude diverse and somewhat 
controversial subjects as African- 
American literature, black poetry 
and theater, black women writers 
and blacks in the media. What 
makes teaching such a rewarding 
experience for Fahamisha is the 
unique group of students that en- 
ter her classes. "I always like my 
students because they are a self- 
selected and diverse group who 
ore open to issues that my mate- 
rial raises," she explains. 

Professor Brown believes 
in literature as a form of cultural 
expression. One specific area of 
her teaching is literature in perfor- 
mance. Yet in today's high-tech 
society she feels that it is becom- 
ing "increasingly difficult to teach 
literature as oral performance." 



Fahamisha also finds 
tracing the modes of expression in 
African-American literature quite 
Intriguing. She believes that there 
is a good deal of orality in the 
literature of the blacks. She ob- 
serves that "the kind of language 
an African-America uses is very 
poetic, in terms of rhythm, into- 
nation, and imagery." 

Professor Brown's involve- 
ment with the black culture is just 
as intense outside of the class- 
room. She is on active member 
and former co-chair of the 
Mozambique Support Network of 
Massachusetts. Fahamisha also is 
an active member of 
TronsAmerica, the African-Ameri- 
can lobby for African and Carib- 
bean issues,and has served as 
board member and coordinator 
of the Free South Africa move- 
ment. 

In addition, she is a 
freelance writer and radio pro- 
ducer who hosts a weekly radio 
program, "Black Perspectives,"on 
\A/MBR-Cambridge(88.1 FM). Pro- 
fessor Brown also is a founding 
member of the Kuumba Theater 
of Chicago as well as the Blakluv 
Performing Arts Company of Bos- 
ton. 

She travels to Africa at ev- 
er/ opportunity - most recently to 
present a paper on orality in Afri- 
can-American poetry at the Ninth 
African Literature Conference of 
the University of Ibadan in Nigeria. 



Jean O'OieiU 



r BOSIf'^l.'^l*■^"■''"' 




Known by her students for 
her warmth, cheerfulness, and 



222 Faculty 



positive attitude, 
Jean O'Neill, R.N., is 
a highly-appreci- 
ated member of the 
School of Nursing's 
faculty. For twenty- 
one years now, she 
has held the posi- 
tion of Associate 
Professor in the 
School of Nursing, 
which is also her 
alma mater. 

This year Is the 
second in a row that 
Jean is the SON'S 
senior class advisor. 
In this role she helps 
thesenior class form 
a group spirit, using 
the kind of activities 
that "will make 
them remember BC 
as important in their 
lives." She stresses 
the importance of 
not taking the route of the major- 
ity into a career; rather, she asks, 
"What are you interested in?" and 



promotes that. 

She shows students how 
to transfer their energy into their 
careers, professional organiza- 
tions, and theirrole as futurealumni 
of the School of Nursing. Working 
in the campus school and helping 
to plan parties for its children is 
one important activity, says Jean. 
Other activities include enrolling 
seniors in the National Student 
Nurses Association, and planning 
the Commencement ceremonies 
and Senior Convocation, In which 
graduates are decorated. 



9{urses are peopCe 
lufio care, who re- 
spond to human 
needs. 



Jean teaches nursing stu- 
dents in both their sophomore and 
senior years, so she is able to see 
their development and progres- 



sion. "It is delightful to see which 
aspects of nursing" into which stu- 
dents choose to go, she says. She 
tries to tell them, "There's life be- 
yond this schooll" Jean says she 
hopes in the near future nurses will 
play an even greater part in shap- 
ing the world. She believes more 
ways for nurses to enter into policy- 
making roles are by working with 
the Federal administration. 

She points to the greater num- 
ber of opportunities available to 
nurses today as they move from 
the area of acute care to that of 
prevention. She sees the field of 
nursing growing to encompass 
transfers from other fields as well 
as those from a more diverse stu- 
dent body. "Nurses are people 
who care, who respond to human 
needsl" declares Jean. "Thereare 
so many ways to contributel" 



James Qips 




Every once in a while a profes- 
5or comes along who mixes a true 
gift for teaching with a desire to 
attack the important, pertinent is- 
sues of our age. Since 1976, Boston 
College has been fortunate to 
lave such a professor on its staff in 
he computer science depart- 
Tient, Dr. James Gips. 

Professor Gips came to BC 
after studying at MIT and then 



earning his Ph.D. 
in computer sci- 
ence from 
Stanford Univer- 
sity. It was in these 
years that he dis- 
covered what 
field of study ap- 
pealed to him 
the most - artifi- 
cial intelligence. 
Though he 
began teaching 
other courses, he 
soon made his 
mark at BC by 
designing a 
course that was 
one of the first of 
its kind in the 
world, a lab 
course known as 
Robotics. Hidden 
in the basement 
of Fulton is the 
lab, complete 
with six Apple 
computers and six Hero 2000 ro- 
bots — oil of which the students 
work with throughout the semes- 
ter. 

Although the course includes 
lectures and occasional guest 
speakers, it primarily uses a hands- 
on approach which, according 
to Gips, creates o "really strong 
spirit among the students." 

The Hero 2000 robots, each 



named after one of Snow White's 
dwarfs, are two feet high, weigh 
forty pounds and cost $2 ,400 when 
fully assembled. They are designed 
with an arm that mimics a human 
shoulder and elbov>/. In addition, 
the robots hove two sonars that 
send out sound waves; these 
check for objects in front of and 
above the unit. 

One of the course's weekly 
assignments asks the students to 
program the Hero 2000 to go down 
the hallway with 60 cents taped 
to its head looking for someone to 
buy it a Coke. The robot has to be 
able to deal with obstacles such 
as passers-by who might obstruct 
its path. Once a complying per- 
son is found the robot has to com- 
municate its purpose, receive the 
Coke, and then return to base 
flawlessly for the student to re- 
ceive full credit. 

Another assignment has the 
robots monuever through in- 
creasingly difficult obstacle 
courses in the hallway. Like the 
Coke assignment, again students 
have to utilize the robot's sonar — 
so they con sense the world 
around them effectively. Cham- 
pagne is stationed at the finish line 
along with trophies for the groups 
with the fastest times. 

Besides stimulating his students 
to think critically when designing 
their programs, Gips feels it is 
equally important to get students 
to consider the serious socio-eco- 



nomic ramifications of the Age of 
the Robot. He foresees robots 
"vacuuming homes by them- 
selves, mowing lawns from 
memory, and playing on even 
more significant role in the auto- 
mobile industry." With such ad- 
vances on the horizon, being con- 
scious of the effects of each 
breakthrough is critical. 



"%pSots iviitbt 
vacuuming homes By 
tfiemsetvesj mowing 
tazimsfrom memory, and 
playing an even more 
significant rote in the 
automoSik industry. " 



In addition to Gips' unques- 
tionably valuable work as a pro- 
fessor of Robotics, he is also an 
accomplished writer. In 1979, his 
book, Logarithic Aesthetics won 
the Alpha Sigma Nu Book Award, 
acknowledging his book as one of 
the two best books of the year. 
Also, in the spring semester of last 
year, he went on sabbatical and 
completed a textbook entitled 
Lotus 1,2,3. "So far it has gotten 
good reviews," notes Gips," so I 
can only hope schools will moke 
use of it." 



Sr. Maryaiyce Qiifeatfier 




SND 



Sr. Maryalyce Gllfeather, 
has a passion for teaching. 



She admits it, her students 
admit it. She says she 
believes, "There is no 
more noble profession 
than education. 
You're working with 
children's minds, help- 
ing to form their atti- 
tudes. I believe it's a 
privilege to be an 
educator. There's a 
power in education to 
be able to mold the 
minds of a future gen- 
eration." She cannot 
imagine herself in any 
other profession. Cur- 
rently, she has held the 
position of adjunct in- 
structor in the School 
of Education for three 
years, while also work- 
ing towards her Ph.D. 
in Administration and 
Curriculum. Previously, 
she had been an el- 
ementary school teacher and o 
principal for ten years. For nine- 



teen years she has been a nun in 
the Sisters of the Notre Dame. 

This past semester, Sr. 
Maryalyce has been the teacher 
of a senior capstone class, an ex- 
perimental class that tries to pull 
together all that students hove 
learned in both their education 
classes and student teaching ex- 
periences. Sr. Maryalyce particu- 
larly likes working with this year's 
senior class because they were 
the first class she taught on com- 
ing to BC. "That was a wonderful 
class. That was one of the joys of 
coming to BC- that first year they 
were just wonderful, so welcom- 
ing, enthusiastic, and eager to 
learn and be good educators." 

"One of the things I'm re- 
ally impressed with here at Boston 
College is the caliber of the stu- 
dents that we hove here. I really 
get excited when I think about the 
students that I've taught going 
out and becoming the teachers 
of tomorrow. I think that our chil- 
dren as well OS our country are 
definitely in a position of being 
blessed with these educators. 



They're just incredible, incredible 
students." 

If she has one message 
f or the SOE senior class, it would be 
"to believe in themselves, believe 
in their own gifts, believe in the 
education they received at Bos- 
ton College, and to take all of that 
away and become the best in 
whatever field they have chosen 
OS their career." 



l^ere is no more noble 
profession than educa- 
tion, 'you 're working with 
children 's minds, helping 
to form their attitudes. I 
Believe it 's aprovilege to 
Be an educator... 



"My greatest role here is to help 
them discover the gifts that they 
hove. I just trust that they're going 
to go out there and be the best 
teachers they can bel" 



Faculty 223 



Beginning September 1 , 1991 , tilings 
wil be a little different around the Boston 
College Finance Department. On that 
date, BC warmly welcomes back to the 
faculty Dr. Frank Campanella, who for 
the past eighteen years has served as the 
University's Executive Vice President. 

A native of the Boston area, he has 
remained close to home since his days at 
BC High School with the exception of his 
undergraduate work in engineering at 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in New 
York. His post-graduate studies earned 
him an IVIBA from Babson College and a 
DBA from Harvard Business School. 

Campanella will resume a role he 
began at BC in the fall of 1970 as an 
assistant professor of Finance. "It has al- 
ways been my plan to return to the fac- 
ulty. There comes a time when if you're 
going to do it, you've got to do it. I 
wanted to leave enough time in return- 
ing to lead a productive life as a teocher. " 

When he took over 18 years ago, 
things were much different around cam- 
pus. The early '70s were a time of student 
unrest not helped by an administration 
that lacked cohesiveness. 

" I think I introduced a careful sense of 
discipline and management to the Uni- 
versity that didn't exist before. Coming 
from the faculty helped a lot. It enabled 
me to develop a credibility with the Uni- 
versity community and faculty that I 
value." 



" It fias aCzvaifs Seen my 
goaCto return to tfiefac- 
j utty. Inhere comes a time 
i wfien if you 're going to do 
it, you 'vegot to do it. " 



As University Executive Vice Presi- 
dent, Campanella's duties included the 
overseeing of BC 's internal management, 
its space management, both its long- 
term and annual operating finances and 
its information technology. The Vice 
Presidents of Academics, Student Affairs 
and Human Resources reported to him 
and together they formed a bond whose 
strength typified a much improved ad- 
ministration. 

"What I'll miss most about the job is 
the feeling of accomplishment it gave 
me to work with such a good group of 
colleagues and friends. Throughout the 
past two decades we've solved a lot of 
problems. I was often thrown into situa- 



^rank^ Cam-paneCCa 




tlons with people I didn't know, but we 
were always able to establish a sense of 
trust ... I felt that I developed a good deal 
of mutual respect along the way." 

During the past eighteen years, 
Campanella has seen the University grow 
not only in its financial strength but in 
terms of its physical facilities as well. How- 
ever, he notes that BC has benefitted 
most from the people it has acquired 
over the years. "Getting good people is 
only half of the chore — What's more 
difficult is keeping them. We've been 
able to do that in part by allowing them 
to do their jobs. We are very open about 
the way we manage the University and 
that in turn creates a positive spirit, a 



good sense of high morale." 

Asa professor, Campanella looks for- 
ward to both working more directly with 
students again and sharing professional 
interests with colleagues. He notes that 
his style hasn't changed much over the 
years, but points out that he'll be able to 
use his experience over the past two 
decades to make his course that much 
better. 

"I'm also looking forward to having 
some free time to do the things that I 
really love. I've got a lot of reading to 
catch up on and I'd like to do some 
travelling. One goal I'd like to achieve is 
to develop an expertise in International 
Finance." 



224 Frank Campanella 



WaUacc £. QauoCL 




'BC's most generous Bene- 
factor dies at age 82 



Industrialist Wallace E. Carroll, for 
whom BC's Carroll School of IVIanage- 
ment was named , died on September 29 
in Illinois following a lengthy illness. The 
chairman and CEO of Katy Industries, he 
was 82. 

Mr. Carroll, a 1928 graduate, was 
a member of the Board of Trustees from 



1 972 to 1 974, and served on that group's 
predecessor, the Board of Directors. In 
1989 he and his family committed $10 
million to Boston College, the largest pri- 
vate gift ever made to the University. 
Later that year, on the occasion of the 
50th anniversary of the School of Man- 
agement, the school was named for Mr. 
Carroll. 

"Wallace Carroll," said University 
President J. Donald Monan, SJ, "was one 
of Boston College's most loyal and long- 
standing friends. Wallace Carroll was 
one of the earliest Boston College gradu- 
ates to systematically build and lead a 
large, diversified business enterprise. 
Throughout his life he was committed to 



producing economic benefits ratherthan 
reaping their personal rewards. A busi- 
ness leader and philanthropist, he re- 
mained a private man intensely dedi- 
cated to the circle that formed his ex- 
tended family." BC, said President 
Monan, "Has lost one of its loyal gradu- 
ates. As trustee, counselor, benefactor, 
he always stood ready to help and never 
seek recognition. His responses were al- 
ways those of a son to an alma mater." 

CSOM Dean John J. Neuhauser 
said , "Wallace Carroll was an enormously 
gifted and generous man. Few alumni of 
any institution have so tangibly shown an 
abiding interest in their alma mater 
through generosity expressed along so 
many dimensions. This warm affection 
has happily spread to his children and 
grandchildren. We in the Wallace E. 
Carroll School of Management — stu- 
dents, faculty and administrators — are 
proud to bear an adopted name and 
are committed to continuing the legacy 
of this thoughtful, committed industrial 
leader." 

The son of a Taunton, Massachu- 
setts, blacksmith, Mr. Carroll worked as a 
laborer while attending BC. He later 
pursued graduate studies in business at 
MIT, Harvard, New York University and 
Northwestern, 

Mr. Carroll worked for the New 
York Telephone Co. before joining a gage 
manufacturing company in Providence, 
Rhode Island, in 1934. Two years later he 
founded Size Control Co., a Chicago- 
based gage manufacturing concern that 
soon prospered by supplying the war 
effort with machine parts. 

Mr. Carroll acquired other metals 
and machine concerns, which comprise 
the core of Katy Industries, Inc., a con- 
glomerate of more than 43 companies 
and divisions formed in 1970. He was also 
chairman emeritus of CRL, Inc., a firm 
privately held by the Carroll family. 

Mr. Carroll participated in U.S. 
government trade missions and served 
on the board of the Sonntag Foundation 
for Cancer Research, the Chicago Boys 
Club, DePaul University, the American 
Ireland Fund, and Catholic Charities. He 
received honorary degrees from Boston 
College and DePaul University. 

He is survived by his wife, Leila; 
threesons,WallaceE.Jr.,'66,DenisH.'64, 
and Barry J. '65; a daughter, Leila Carroll 
Johnson; and 18 grandchildren, 



Reprinted with permission by tine Boston 
Coiiege Office of Communications 



I 



Wallace E. Carroll 225 




226 Activities 




Activities 



Activities at Boston College form a vital and fulfilling 
part of the college experience. Since the forming 
of The Dramatic Society, Boston College's oldest 
club, to the nev\/ly formed Heightsmen, activities 
have given students the opportunity to learn and 
experience life outside the classroom . The tradition 
of being involved has been strong at Boston Col- 
lege, and as the v\/orld around us changes, so too 
do the activities. Emphasis on cultural harmony led 
to the establishment of the Intercultural Club. The 
concern for the environment caused the Environ- 
mental Action Committee to lead the way with 
recycling at B.C. All across campus, traditions in 
activities are being redefined. 



Activities 227 




All photos by Mary Manion 



228 UGBC 




Redefining Life af BC: 



UGBC Moving Ahead in me 90's 




UGBC is an organization 
that is at tine focal point of 
undergraduate life at Bos- 
ton College. UGBC is re- 
sponsible for numerous 
events which reflect a tradi- 
tion of leadership and com- 
munity spirit. Under the 
presidency of Rick Culliton, 
keynote speakers, such as 
John Kerry, hove been 
brought to the Heights. The 
first annual homecoming 
brunch was a big success 
and demonstrated that 
UGBC is not afraid to try 
something different in order 
to form a future tradition. 
Thanks to UGBC, 10,000 Ma- 
niacs was brought to a 
packed Conte Forum as a 
result of student requests for 
their appearance. 



Prominent speakers have 
been brought in to talk 
about today's pertinent is- 
sues, from sexual discrimina- 
tion to rape awareness. 
UGBC also took a daring 
plunge this year by adding 
the Department of Social 
Awareness to the Cabinet. 
This move has proven to be 
successful in that many vol- 
unteer organizations have 
been organized, from work 
with the elderly to a Heights 
Big Brother/Big Sister pro- 
gram. All in all, the under- 
graduate government has 
been successful in moving 
forward while still maintain- 
ing a tradition of providing 
social and educational 
events for BC. 

UGBC 229 




230 UGBC 





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UGBC 231 




The Tradition Continues: 



Student Admissions Celebrates 15 Years 



The Student Admissions Pro- 
gram is an opportunity for 
present students to Inelp ac- 
quaint prospective BC stu- 
dents with the University. 
SAP is now a solid tradition at 
Boston College with a cel- 
ebration of their fifteenth 
anniversary this year, SAP is 
currently one of the largest 
student-run organizations 
on campus with nearly 800 
volunteers, By providing 
small group tours, individual 
day visits to campus, and 
local high school visits. 



232 Student Admissions Prograrh 



SAP helps to reassure appli- 
cants that they have made 
the right choice in applying 
to Boston College, Mem- 
bers also have an opportu- 
nity to assist the University in 
selecting quality applicants 
through the use of student 
interviewers. Through SAP, 
members have an impact 
on the kind of students Bos- 
ton College attracts and, 
equally as important, learn 
more about themselves in 
the process. 



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Student Admissions Program 233 



234 The Heights 




The Heights: 



Keeping BC Up to Dote and on the Boll 



'■^^^.in, 




Just another manic Mon- 
day! Let's face it. . . Mon- 
days are horrible. The 
thought of a 9:00 am Ad- 
vanced Calculus class after 
a relaxing, fun-filled week- 
end is painful. If there is one 
thing that mal<es Mondays 
more bearable at BC, it has 
to be the Heights waiting for 
you hot off the press in 
McElroy lobby. The Heights 
is the independent student 
weekly, a vital part of life 
here. From feature stories to 
the creative "Voices on the 
Dustbowl", the Heights al- 
ways gives students some- 
thing to talk about. 




The Heights 235 



Literary and Artistic Exceller^ce: 



Stylus Sets the Standard 



stylus, the literary and art 
magazhe of Boston Col- 
lege, was first established in 
1882. Its aim is to cultivate 



literary excellence by stimu- 
lating interest in writing for 
publication. All under- 
graduates are invited to 



submit short stories, poetry, 
artwork, and photography 
for three yearly issues of Sty- 
lus. 




236 Stylus 



The Observer: 



Conservative and Controversial Journalism 



The Observer is Boston 
College's or~ily conservative 
student newspaper. For the 
past seven years, this some- 
times controversial publica- 
tion has emerged as a fo- 
rum for many of the most 
hotly debated issues on 
campus. It is self-supporting 
and editorially indepen- 
dent of the University. The 



staff is involved in all aspects 
of newspaper publishing in- 
cluding typesetting, adver- 
tising, layout, photography, 
graphics, and distribution. 
The Observer provides yet 
another means by which 
students with an active in- 
terest in campus affairs can 
become involved in writing. 




The Observer 237 




The Sound of Music: 



WZBC Redefines BC's Listening Pleasures 



238 WZBC 



WZBC is an independently 
run radio station, iocated at 
90,3 FlVl on tine radio diai. 
TInis renowned station was 
one of several college sta- 
tions featured in "Rolling 
Stone" last year for their ef- 
forts in promoting new mu- 
sic. At BC, WZBC, with its 
range of about 50 miles, 
gives beginners in radio a 
chance to gain valuable 
experience in broadcast- 
ing. The music ranges from 
rock and progressve music 
to special features on folk 
and Jazz, WZBC, by not lim- 
iting itself to just traditional 
music, redefines what it 
means to be a college radio 
station. 




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WZBC 239 



Center Stage Hits It BIG! 



"You Can't Take It With You" and "Brigadoon" 



Center Stage provides 
tliesbians at Boston College 
the opportunity to do what 
they love best . . . ACT! 
Theater is an integral part of 
a liberal arts education. 
Productions are done at the 
Robsham Theatre Arts Cen- 
ter, the first permanent 
home designed for the pro- 
duction of dramatical works 
at Boston College. The tra- 
dition of dramatic produc- 
tion is growing stronger ev- 
ery year, Evidence of this 
was found in this year's ac- 
claimed productions of the 
humorous "You Can't Take It 
With You" and the bitter- 
sweet musical "Brigadoon." 





240 Center Stage 



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The Oldest Tradition in Organizations: 



Dramatic Society Presents its 126tln Seasor^ 



Tl~ie Boston College Dra- 
matic Society, the oldest 
student organization on 
campus, presented its 1 26th 
season of plays this year. 
Once again, the level of 
excellence was of the high- 
est quality with productions 
such as "A Night Of One 
Acts" and "Arms and the 
Man." The Society dedi- 
cates itself to educating its 
members in the nature and 
potential of the theater ex- 
perience. Members re- 
ceive training in various as- 
pects of theater, including 
acting, directing, and de- 
sign. 

242 Dramatic Society 




Contemporary Theater: 



Acting to Enlighten 




The Contemporary Theater 
of Boston College is a stu- 
dent-run independent the- 
ater company devoted to 
producing plays dealing 
with contemporary moral 
and social issues. They 
present shows that explore 
the link between modern 
theater and modern soci- 
ety. In addition, it explores 
theater as an art form, as 
well as a means of political 
expression. Presenting four 
student-directed produc- 
tions a year, they have been 
successful with such plays as 
"Abington Square." The 
CTBC is an important aspect 
of theater at Boston Col- 
lege. 




Contemporary Theater 243 




A World Performance: 



The University Chorale Delights at BC and Abroad 



Composed of one hundred 
and fifty men and women, 
the University Chorale has 
been distinguished as one 
of the finest collegiate cho- 
ruses in the United States. 
Directed by Dr. C. 
Alexander Peloquin, the 
Chorale performs works of 
both classical and contem- 
porary composers, sacred 
and secular music, as well as 
major liturgical pieces 
composed by Dr. Peloquin. 
There are usually two major 
on-campus performances 
with full orchestra each se- 



mester. The Chorale has 
also been privileged to per- 
form at Boston's Symphony 
Hall, The National Cathe- 
dral and the Kennedy Cen- 
ter for the Performing Arts in 
Washington D.C., Lincoln 
Center in New York. The 
other side of the Atlantic is 
no stranger to this BC tradi- 
tion either, since they have 
performed in London, Paris, 
Rome, and throughout 
Germany. The University 
Chorale continues to set 
standards to musical excel- 
lence at BC and abroad. 



244 The University Chorale 




B.C. bOp! Boogies: 



It's BC'S Answer to Cool Jazz 




B.C, bOp! is BC'S answer to 
cool jazz. With a band full of 
saxophones, trumpets, 
trombones, keyboard, gui- 
tar, bass, and drums, the 
group's vocalists delight 
and entertain audiences 
with music from the 40's to 
the 90's. Last year, they be- 
gan a new tradition here at 
BC with the first B.C.bOpI 
High School Jazz Festival 
where seven local high 
school bands competed. 
With performances at "Cafe 
Night," dances, school func- 
tions, and annual concerts 
at Robsham, B.C. bOpI is 
sure to put on a show that is 
both a joy to watch and of 
the highest quality in jazz. 




B.C. bOp! 245 



The Bostonians Go Up The Ladder: 



Singing Witli Acappella Class 



Established in the Spring of 
1986, the Bostonians is Bos- 
ton Coiiege's only co-ed 
accapello singing group. 
They sing every genre of 
music from classical to jazz 
and modern. Their lively 
and entertaining shov\/s 
have drawn packed 
crowds everywhere as well 
as a loyal following. Crowd 
favorites include "Up the 
Ladder," "Rock Lobster," as 
well as the Beatles "Back in 
the USSR." Every show is sure 
to be a class act followed by 
a standing ovation, 





246 The Bostonians 




A Night Out With The Guys: 



The Heightsmen Do It Acoppello Style 




The Heightsmen, BC's new- 
est tradition, was estab- 
lished lost year as the all- 
male accapella singing 
group. Modeled after such 
world renown groups as the 
Harvard Din and Tonics, and 
the Princeton Nassoons, the 
Heightsmen have quickly 
gained a loyal following. 
After stunning audiences at 
last fall's accapella test in 
Gosson with such songs as 
"Silhouettes on the Shade" 
and Schoolhouse Rock's 
"Interjection," the 
Heightsmen have contin- 
ued to grow into a powerful 
musical force here at BC. 

The Heightsmen 247 



Dance Ensemble: 



Moving to the Beat of the Nineties 



The Dance Ensemble at 
Boston College provides for 
a creative means of self ex- 
pression through! various 
forms of dance. Founded in 
1980, it has become one of 
the new traditions at BC, 
performing everything from 
jazz to modern. Two shows 
ore performed yearly. This 
year's fall production, Into 
the Spotlight , received rave 
reviews, featuring music 
from M.C. Hammer, Sinead 
O'Connor, and INXS. 





248 Dance Ensemble 




Improv at its Finest: 



My Mother's Fleobog Keeps BC Laughing 



The perfect way to forget all 
your troubles and be happy 
is to catch a production of 
IVIy Mother's Fleabag, Bos- 
ton College's very own im- 
provisatlonal comedy 
troupe, The comedy is fast 
and free-flowing, ranging 
from charades-like antics to 
spoofs on campus happen- 
ings. This is definitely a com- 
edy tradition redefined. . . so 
don't miss it! 




IVIy Mother's Fleabag 249 




250 Marching Band 



The Screaming Eagles: 



Marching Onward And Upward To The Future 




Marching Band 251 



The Eagle Cheerleaders: 



Getting BC Psyched 




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252 Cheerleaders 




Cheerleaders 253 




254 Intramural Sports 



Intramural Sports at Boston College: 



Just a Little Friendly Competition 




A combination of competi- 
tion and fun is whiat mal<es 
the intramural sports pro- 
gram so popular here at the 
Heights. Organized through 
"The Plex," intramuralsoffera 
variety of sports from touch 
football and softball, to 
basketball and co-ed vol- 
leyball. Although it gives all 
students the opportunity to 
develop skills and broaden 
their interests in various 
sports, anyone who has 
played in or watched one of 
these tournaments realizes 
that these players are seri- 
ous about winning. But it's 
just a little friendly competi- 
tion, or is it??? 




Intramural Sports 255 



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The Varsity Alternative 



h 



Club Sports Get BC Moving 



There is nothing like the feel- 
ing of comoraderie and 
team spirit that comes with 
being a member of an ath- 
letic team. Club sports like 
Women's Lacrosse, Cycling 
and Utiimate Frisbee en- 
able students at Boston 
College to enjoy competi- 
tive sports without the stress 
and time commitment that 
are associated with Varsity 
sports. These students, while 
playing and practicing 
hard and long, also know 



how to have a good time. 
The Ultimate Frisbee team, 
better known as the 
Spoonheads, has been a 
BC tradition for over thirteen 
years and continues to 
have winning seasons. The 
Women's Lacrosse Club is 
one of BC's newest clubs. 
Started last year, the team 
has grown and hopes to 
add several new oppo- 
nents to their schedule this 
year. 




Club Sports 257 



Adding to Life in tine Dorm 



Residence Hall Council 



The Residence Hall Council, 
otherwise known as RHC, is 
elected from the residence 
halls in each residence 
area. The elected menn- 
bers represent student inter- 
ests in the review of housing 
policies, sponsor events 
through area council pro- 
gramnning, and make rec- 
ommendations for the im- 
provement of physical fa- 
cilities. This year's RHC has 
sponsored Christmas 
Dances, ski trips to area 
mountains and parties for 
underprivileged children at 
both O'Connell and 
Roncalli. 




258 RHC 



Women's Resource Center 



Emphasizing Women's Changing Roles 




The Women's Resource 
Center at Boston College, 
located in McElroy 213, was 
founded in 1973, to support 
and encourage women in 
thie attainment of tineir per- 
sonal and professional 
goals. The center offers a 
comfortable atmosphere 
for women to research infor- 
mation, relax, and meet 
new people. The Women's 
Resource Center, above all, 
emphasizes the many possi- 
bilities open to women in 
today's changing world. 



Women's Resource Center 259 



The University CInaplaincy 



Helping Students to Moke a Difference 



The University Cl-iapiaincy at 
Boston Coilege is an integral 
part of tine spiritual experi- 
ence here at the Heights. 
They strive to help in forming 
students who are aware of 
their need for personal val- 
ues, for service directed to 
others, particularly those 
unjustly treated by society, 
and for a personal relation- 
ship with their God. They 
divide their goals into three 
main areas: worship, com- 
mitment and direction. First, 
the Chaplaincy provides a 
variety of Eucharist oppor- 
tunities for all members of 
the University. Second, the 
Chaplaincy offers an op- 
portunity for students to 
participate in a wide variety 



of projects designed to help 
remedy specific areas of 
injustice and inequality. 
Through opportunities such 
as The Appolachia Project, 
Urban Immersion, the Haiti 
Pilgrimage, the World Hun- 
ger Committee, the Coali- 
tion for Promotion of Peace 
and the EAC, volunteers get 
the opportunity to experi- 
ence a world and way of life 
that is different from their 
own, a world that they can 
change for the better. Fi- 
nally, the Chaplaincy seeks 
to give students direction in 
their human and religious 
growth through personal 
counseling. They also pro- 
vide several weekend re- 
treats each semester. 






The University Chaplaincy 261 




262 The University Chaplaincy 



m 



Drop a pebble in the water: just a splash, ar^d it is gone; 

But there's half-a-hundred ripples circling on and on and on. 
Spreading, spreading from the center, flowing on out to the sea. 

And there is no way of telling where the end is going to be. . . 

JAMES W. FOLEY 




Living it Up at O'Connell House 



Where a Ghost is the Life of the Party! 



O'Connell House is located 
in the middle of Upper 
Campus and for years has 
been the source of chilling 
tales about an unfriendly 
ghost inhabiting it. Once 
know as the Ligget Estate, it 
was given to Boston College 
OS a gift from O'Connell in 
1937. Various programs and 
dances are sponsored at 
O'Connell with the help of 
the students who reside in 
the mansion and assist in the 
programming. A dance 
that brings much hype to 
both the house and BC is the 
very extravagant and 
popular Middle March. Just 
be on the lookout for ghosts 
while you're there! 





264 O'Connell House 



The BC Film Board 



It's Just Good, Clean, Fun - That's Free!!! 



J 



We've all had those Satur- 
day nights. You're tired afl'er 
a long \A/ee[<end of expen- 
sive partying and now the 
wallet's empty, What's a 
person to do? The BC Film 
Board has the solution to all 
your worries. Every week- 
end, it provides a popular 
movie, free of charge in 
McGuinn. The Board works 
to bring the BC community 
the best entertainment pos- 
sible. Since they are always 
looking for suggestions, 
drop them a line If there is 
something you've been dy- 
ing to see. Who knows, 
when that fateful Saturday 
night comes along, it may 
be the answer to all your 
prayers. 




Friday and Saturday 7:30 and 10:00 pm 
McGuinn Auditorium 

Sunday 7:00 pm Barry Pavilion, Newton 



im LITTLE MfiRpiD 

Released by Walt Disney Company 

Produced by Howard Ashman and John Musker 

Directed by John Musker and Ron Clements 

Screenplay by John Musker and Ron Clements Voices: Jodi Benson, Kenneth Mars, 

Pat Carroll, Buddy Hackett, Samuel E. Wright, Rene Auberjonois (C) Rated G 

Distributed by Films Incorporated 

FILMS INCORPORATED 



Film Board 265 




Murray House: 



We're not Just Spaghetti Anymore! 




Murray House has a new 
battle cry -- "We're riot just 
spaghetti anymore!" Usually 
identified with Thursday 
night pasta, Murray House 
has moved from just culinary 
expertise to providing a 
commuter center for Boston 
College. It has redefined 
the traditional claim of spa- 
ghetti dinners and now of- 
fers many desirable features 
for commuter students. All 
students are welcome and 
encouraged to attend all of 
their functions or just drop by 
to study, relax, watch mov- 
ies, or play in their game 
room. It's not just spaghetti 
these days! 



B" 



266 Murray House 



The Student Programs and Activities Center: 



SPAC Has All Your Club's Needs 



Okay, What exactly is 
SPAC? You l-iear about it all 
the time but have never re- 
ally come in contact with it, 
right? Hear's the dirt on 
SPAC. The Student Pro- 
grams and Activities Center 
assists students in registering 
new clubs, programming 
events, fundraising, and in 
promoting leadership and 



organizational develop- 
ment. They also provide in- 
formation to students inter- 
ested in becoming involved 
in campus activities and 
act as a liason between 
ODSD and student organi- 
zations. Sound like pretty 
busy people? Wait, there's 
more. SPAC also sponsors 
alternative 



campus programming, 
making it easier for students 
to showcase their talents 
and for students and faculty 
to interact. Some of SPAC's 
successes include "Thursday 
Night at the Cafe" in 
McElroy Cafe, the Faculty- 
Student Roundtable Discus- 
sions and co-sponsoring 
the Speak-out series with 



Bapst Library. In addition, 
the SPAC staff edits and 
publishes monthly publica- 
tions for student leaders in- 
cluding the BC Student 
Leader Newsletter and the 
University Programming 
Board Calendar. So, the 
next time you hove an idea 
for a new club, SPAC has 
the information you need. 




SPAC 267 



International Clubs: 



Diversifing Boston College 



striving to broaden tlie fio- 
rizons of tine BC community, 
tine internationaiCiubs give 
vaiuoble insigint into the 
cuituroi differences of tiie 
v\/orld outside our campus. 
With an abundant seiection 
of groups, from tine Asian 
Caucus, winicin is comprised 
of tine Japan Ciub, tine Ko- 
rean Students Association, 
and tine Vietnamese Stu- 
dents Associations, to tine 
Organization of Latin 
American Affairs, thie ciubs 
offer a rewarding educa- 
tional experience for mem- 
bers. 





268 Internationai Ciubs 




International Clubs 269 




270 Activities 




Seniors 



Life takes its course, hiappy at times, miserable at 
otliers, but fiiled witin a deep mystery. Witli tlie 
promise of an ur^l<nown future and tlie drama of a 
hidden past. 

Every person is a mystery ttiat must be learned, 
slowly, reverently, v\/ith care, tenderness and pain, 
but is never learned completely. 

Withiin eachi person there is at v/ork a principle of 
growi-h to some good end and a life-giving exu- 
berance, 

- Nina Traub 




Seniors 273 




274 Seniors 




Seniors 275 




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Seniors 277 










There is no possession more valuable than a 
good and faithful friend. — Socrates 







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The better part of one's life consists 
of his friendships. — Abe Lincoln 






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280 Seniors 




Seniors 281 




AMY AARON 

School of Nursing 
B.S, Nursing 



EDWARD M. ABANY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Communications 



KRISTEN M. ABATE 

School of IVIanagement 
B.S. Finance 



ELIZABETH R. 
ABBRUZZESE 

School of Education 

B.A. Math/Secondary 

Education 




BETH S. ABRAMS 

School of Education 

B. A. Secondary Education/ 

English 



JOSEPH J. 
ABRENICA 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Political Science 



DEEMA ABU 
GHAZALEH 

School of Management 
B S Finance 



NICOLA ABU MONIQUE ACEVEDO 

KHADER Arts & Sciences 

School of Management B.A. Communications 

B S Finance/General Mgmt 




AILEEN ADAMS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MARK E. ADAMS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



KERRYN E. AHR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Political Science 



LYNN A. AIRASIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ROBERT S. AITELLI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




STEPHANIE ALECCI CARA ALEXANDER 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S, Finance B.A. Communications 



CESAR F. ALFARO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



OMAR ALI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CATHERINE ALIAGA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



282 Seniors 



ANGELI A. ALINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Studio Art 



ANDREW D. 
ALISAGO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Ctiemistry 



NANCY ALLAIRE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 



MARYE ALLEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



STEPHEN L ALLOR 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 




IRMA N. ALONSO 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



GENEVIEVE 
AMBROSINO 

Schooi of Education 
i.A Human Development 



ERIC E. AMELIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JENNIFER L AMENT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARK AMOROSI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




M^kM 



MICHAEL AMORUSO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



BRIAN W. 
ANDERSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DAVID M. 
ANDERSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KEVIN ANDERSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM N. 
ANDERSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




DEANA ANDRUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN R. ANGELICA LYNN A. ANGEUNI 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. Economics B.S. Nursing 



SOFIA ANGLES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Speech 



KARIN P. ANGLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
l.A. English/ Communications 



Seniors 283 




ALICE M. 
ARANGUREN 

School of Management 
B,S, Finance 



SONIA ARAUJO 

School of Management 
B.S, Marketing 



JOEL F. ARCIERI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




STEPHANIE E. 
ANTHONY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MICHAEL A. 
ANTINO JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




MICHAEL 
ANTONELLIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Speech Communications 



ROBERT D. AQUINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




LILIANA ARGUELLES 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 



AIDA ARIAS- 
MARXAUCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




EVAN A. ARMATAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



DONALD P. 
ARMSTRONG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science/Spanish 



KERRY A. 
ARMSTRONG 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KEITH J. ARRUDA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/ Pre-Med 



ROSEMARIE C. 
ARRUDA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



284 Seniors 



<EVIN F. ARSENAULT 

School of Management 
B,S, Finance/Marketing 



DIANE M. 
AUBUCHON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ANTHONY J. 
AUFIERO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARY P. 
AUGENTHALER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



IRIS AYALA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. French 




CHRISTINE L AYERS 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 



JEFFREY R. 
BABCOCK 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




KRISTEN A. BAKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology/Philosophy 



CHRYSA BALAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Germanic Studies 




PETER C. BALBONIE SCOH S. BALDYGA 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Economics/Accounting B.A. English 



WENDY C. BAGDI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CAROLYN M. 
BAGLEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ADRIENNE J. BAKER 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

Communications 



Seniors 285 




The overall experience is some- 
thing that can't be matched by just 
going to college. 




CLAUDIA M. BALZER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CHRISTINA A. 
BAMBERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




CHRISTINA A. 
BAMBRICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A Economics 



BRYAN BANKS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MARY ANGELA 
BANTE 

School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 



LAURIE A. BAPTIST MARIA BARAGANO OLIVER H. BARBER JEFFREY L BARDEN 

School of Nursing School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 




DARLENE L. BARKER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KRISTEN BARLEHA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JEANNE C. 
BARNOSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



ANTHONY M. 
BARRAL 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



TODD J. BARREH 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



286 Seniors 



PAUL J. 
BARROQUEIRO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathemetics 



HEATHER M. BARRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHLEEN BARRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Politicai Science 




When I was young 
I was sure of everything. 



JOHN G. B ARTELS 

School of IVlanagement 
B.S. Accounting 



JACQUELINE M. 
BARTLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




KELLYANN 
BARTOLOMEI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CHRISTINE M. 
BASQUE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Histor//French 




NANCY T. BASSEH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



FREDERICK W. 
BATEMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Communications/Theatre 




MARY FRANCIS 
BATEMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



LORI A. BATISTA 

School of Education 
B.A. Secondary Education 



MIQUEL F. BATILLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ANJALI BATRA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DAVID P. BAUER 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors 287 




KELLEY P. BEAL 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHRISTOPHER E. COREY D. BEASLEY JOSEPH L BEASLEY DAVID M. BEATRICE 

g^^|_f Scliool of IVianagement Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisii/Political Science 



B.S. Marl<eting 



B.A, History 



B.A. English/Philosophy 



JONATHAN P. 
BEAUCHESNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



HEATHER E. BECK 

Sctiool of fVlanagement 
B.S. Accounting 



MARGARET A. 
BEDEVIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Sociology 



STACEY S. BEEH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psyctioiogy 



LORI A. BEGIN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL T.BEIRNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



JEFFREY J. BELLOWS GEOFFREY BENARICK 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Marketing B.A. Economics 



CAROLYN M. 
BENENATI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MARSHA A. BENNEH MICHAEL P. BENNEH ANDREA L BENOIT 

School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Human Development/ B.A. Communications/English B.A. Communications 
Economics 



288 Seniors 



PAOLA BERESH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ADAM D. BERG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




CHRISTOPHER P. i 
BEETEL j 

Arts & Sciences ! 

B.A. Political Science i 






LAURA M. BERG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



BRENDA J. BERGIN 

Sctiool of Education 

B.A. Elementary/Moderate 

Special Education 



CHRISTINE BERL 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



LOURDES M. 
BERNARDO 

Arts & Sciences 
.A. Communications 



ANNABELLE BERRIOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




JOAN E. BERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SUSAN M. BERRY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



ELIZABETH H. 
BERTOUNO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICIA A. BARUBE DANIEL R. BEVERE 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics B.A. History 





hmM 



NANCY E. BEVERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



TSEDAL BEYENE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



THOMAS BHISITKUL JAMES A. BIANCHI 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. English B.S. Marketing 



KELLY M. BIBY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




JEANNE BILLINGS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



LISA M. BILLINGS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SARAH BILLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



PETER P. BILODEAU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MELANE BISBAS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors 289 



FRIENDSHIP IS . . . 





/ ■ 



THE WINE OF LIFE. 




CHAD D. BISHOP 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



VINCENT BITONG 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN A. BLACK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




/ fiave always thought the actions 

of men the Best interpreters of 

their thoughts -Lock^ 



CHERYL BLAIS 

Schooi of Education 

B.A, Eariy Childhood 

Education 



COLIN I. BLAKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




MAUREEN M. 
BLANDINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. iVlathematics 



JENNIFER BLANEY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




BRUCE M. BLAU DAVID P. BLESSING 

Arts & Sciences Schooi of Management 

i.A. Speech Communications/ 
Philosophy 




CHARLOHE K. 
BLINNE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science/ 

Philosophy 



STEPHANIE G. BLUM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



292 Seniors 




THOMAS F. BOHAN KEVIN J. BOLAND 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A, Psychology B.A. Economics 



JOHN L. BOND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MIECZYSLAW F. 
BORUCH JR. 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ANDREW M. 
BORZUMATO 

Scliool of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors 293 




m 

BOUCHER ' 



MOLLY E. BOSCO 


LOUIS BOHARI 


PAULA BOnORF 


PATRICIA M. 


ROBERT L BOUCH 


Arts & Sciences 
A. English/Communications 


School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 


BOUCHER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 


JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MATHEW MARTIN 
BOURKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




GARREH T. BOWERS 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education/ 

History 




Laughter is not a bad beginning for 

a friendship and it is the best ending 

for one. - Oscar Wilde 




PATRICE BOUZAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



KATHRYN E. 
BOWKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



WELLINGTON J. 
BOWLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Political Science 



WILLIAM W. BOYD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ANNE E. BOYLE 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



294 Seniors 




TROY C. BRACHER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Philosophy 



BRENDAN O. 
BRADLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S, Physics 



EILEEN T. BRADY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN ROLFES 
BRADY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



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Singing in the rain 



KEVIN P. BRADY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 




SAPNA 
BRAHMBHAH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




ROBERT BRANNELLY 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 




CHRIS BRATHAS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Accounting 



KATHERINE M. 
BRATSIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JONATHAN R. BRAY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



NICOLE M. BRAY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ELISE L. BRAYTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. German 



Seniors 295 




THOMAS M. 
BRENNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SARAH C. BRERETON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 



KAREN A. BRIEN 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S. Finance 




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ANN-MARIE BREEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



SUSAN E. BREEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Studio Art 




THERESA M. BREEN 

Sclnool of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CLARENCE BRENAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




MARYANNE 
BRENNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
BA English 



MAHHEW J. 
BRENNAN 

School of Management 
S Accounting 




THOMAS P. BRIODY KENTON C. BROOKS 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Accounting B.A. Economics/Sociology 



296 Seniors 




MARY E. BROOKS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



NANCY A. BROOKS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




EVEMARIE 
BROSNIHAN 

Sctiool of Education 

i.A. Elementary Education/ 
Special Education 



COURTNEY BROWER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisti/Phiilosophy 




DEREK G. BROWN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LISA BROWNSTEIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Thieater Arts 





NEAL D. BRUCE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



COLLEEN P. 
BRUNNICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology/English 



JOSEPH P. BRUNO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



TERE A. BRUNO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



AMY E. BRUSKY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Seniors 297 



VICTORIA R 
BRYAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN A. 
BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



KRISTIN M. 
BRZOSTECKI 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



JENNIFER BUBRISKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARCO L. 
BUCHBINDER 

Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Poiiticol Science 



EDWARD B. 
BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KERRY BUCKLEY 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD E. 
BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



SUSAN C. BUCKLEY 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

Philosophy 



DANNY T.A. BUI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




CAROL MALISSA 
BUIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LAURIE K. 
BUONAIUTO 

School of Education 
i.A, Elementary Education 



LYSEHE A. BURGOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology/Political 

Science 



HEATHER M. BURKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KARA BURKE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




DAVID P. BURNS PATRICIA A. BURNS SUSAN M. BUSCEMI ANDREA BUSCONE THEODORE J. BUSH 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. Psychology B.A. Speech Communications B.A. Communications B.A. History/Political Science 



298 Seniors 



SANDRA 
BUSTAMANTE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



TERRY A. 
BUTKEVICH 

Arts & Sciences 



B.A. French 



MICHELE sun 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



STEPHANIE K. BYRD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



KATHLEEN A. BYRNE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




KATHLEEN M. BYRNE KARI CADWALLADER 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Accounting B.A. Communications/ 

Philosophy 



KARA CADY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOAN P. CAHILL PATRICK J. CAHILL 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




JOSE M. CAICEDO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology/Psychology 



DAVID R. 
CALABRESE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHRISTIAN P. CALL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 



CARRIE CALLAHAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LEE ANNE 
CALLAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Communications 




LINDA CALLAHAN 

School of Education 

Elementary/Moderate Special 

Education 



MARNIE L 
CAMERON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



TANYA CAMPBELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



KIMBERLY K. 
CANALE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHRYN A. CAN AS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications/ English 



Seniors 299 



MERCEDES E. 
CANDELARIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Communications 



SEAN R. CANNARD JAMES E. CANNIFFE NANCY O. CANTU 

Scliool of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B,A. Engiisln/PI~iilosophy b.A. Politicai Science 



DON-ANTHONY 
LOUIS CAPONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Historv 




MICHELLE L 
CAPONE 

Arts & Sciences 
i,A, Communications 



JOLYN K. 
CAPPELLEHI 

School of Education 
B.A, Elementary Education 



STEPHANIE C. 
CAPPIELLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SUZANNE M. 
CAPRARO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Englishi 



ANGELA R. CAPUTO 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Political Science 




EDWARD J. 
CARBONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



SUSAN ELAINE 
CAREY 

Sctiool of Management 
3, A, Business Management 



PETER R. CARIGNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Psychology 



LAURA S. CARILLO 

School of Management 
B,S, Accounting/French 



AMANDA J. 
CARLSON 

School of Management 
BS Marketing 




KERRY CARMODY 

School of Nursing 
B,S, Nursing 



COLLEEN CARNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A, Economics 



ERIN M. CARNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A, Political Science 



KATHLEEN M. 
CARNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



JANE M. CAROLAN 

School of Education 
B.A, Human Development 



302 Seniors 



ANGELA CARRAS BRIDGET A. CARROLL 

School Of Management School of Education 

B.S. Accounting/Finance B.A. Elementary Education 



LISA CARROLL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Studio Art 



MITCHELL D. 
CARROLL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICK J. 
CARROLL 

Arts & Sciences 
B A English/Philosophy 




SANDRA C. 
CARROLL 

School of Management 
B.S. Human Resources 



DOUGLAS S. CARTER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KATHERINE F. 
CARTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology/Philosophy 



MICHAEL CARUSO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KAREN L. CASEY 

School of Education 
i.A. Elementary Education 




MICHELE T. CASEY 

School of Education 

B.A. English/Secondary 

Education 



RITA M. CASEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JAMIE C. CASSAVOY ANNE K. CASTE 



Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Communications 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/History 



LOURES M. 
CASTELLANOS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




MARGARET E. 
CASTRUCCIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



CATHERINE M. 
CATANESE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



CHRISTINE 
CATANESE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHRISTOPHER C. 
CAUDILL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



ANNE M. CAULFIELD 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Seniors 303 




/ zvou[(£6e nothing without you- 

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SEAN CAVANAUGH STEPHEN F. CAVE 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



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NICOLE T. 
CELENTANO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psyclnology 



JENNIFER L CERNAK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




LAUREN CHABOT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KATHRYN ANN 
CHADBOURNE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 




TIMOTHY 
CHAMBERLAIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GREGG A. 
CHAMBERS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KAI M. CHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MARCELO L. CHAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



ODEHE CHANG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



304 Seniors 



HELEN CHAU 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JENNIFER 
CHEESMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



IVA M. CHERETA 

Scl-iool of Management 
B.S, Finance 



KA WAI CHEUNG 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Finance 



HEATHER CHISOLM KRISTEN E. CHISOLM DANNY S. CHOI 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Schooi of Management 

B.S. Biochemistry B.A, Communications B.S. Marl<eting 



JENNY CHOI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Phiiosophy 



LEIGH A. 
CHINCHECK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Engiish 




MIHYUN CHON 

School of Management 
B,S, Finance 




YING CHONG 

Arts & Sciences 

i,A, Communications/Political 

Science 



RODMAN J. 
CHRYSLER 

School of Management 
B,S, Accounting 



DIANA CHUNG 

School of Management 
B,S. Accounting 



DAVID J. CHWALEK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DINA M. 
CIARIMBOU 

School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 



CARLA M. 
CIARROCCHI 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A, Psychology 



MICHAEL L 
CICCHESE 

Arts & Sciences 
B,S, Biology 



JEFFREY L. CIMA 

Arts & Sciences 
B,S, Physics 



JEFFREY B. 
CIANCIOLO 

Arts & Sciences 
i,A, Political Science 




LYNN B. CIUCI 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A, English 



Seniors 305 




AMY J. CLARK 

Arts & Sciences 
3, A, English/Psychology 



CHRISTOPHER C 
CLARK 

Arts & Sciences 
;,A, Psycliology 



DOUGLAS B. CLARK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Frencli 



JENNIFER A. 
CLEARY 

Arts & Sciences 
B A EngiisI-' 



KATHLEEN M. 
CLEARY 

School of Education 
Secondary Education/Englishi 




PAUL D. CLIFFORD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARIA-ELENA 
CLOHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 



EILEEN M. CLOONAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



AILIS CLYNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SEAN P. COADY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 




CAN DACE M. 
COAKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JEANNINE M. COAN LESTINA C. COBB 

School of Nursing Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Nursing B.A. English 



THOMAS ALTON 
COCHRANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Political Science 



DINA R. COFFMAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




DAVID A. COHEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A, Economics/Political 

Science 



306 Seniors 



JERI L COHEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PHILIPS. COHEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOHN F. COLBERT III 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



ROBERT J. 
COLCLOUGH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CATHERINE E.COLE CATHLEEN COLELLA 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.A. Political Science/ 

Philosophy 



FRANCIS J. 
COLEMAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 





PATRICK T. 
COLEMAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARGARET M. 
COLGAN 

School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 



KATHRYN E. COLLIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LAURA A. COLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



NAIRDA T. COLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




^ficyre sharing a drinkj^h^y caCCConeCiness, 
^ut it's betUr than drinking atom. 



ADAM J. COLETY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Histor/ 




FRANCIS A. 
COLORIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




KEVIN COLTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




MICHELE E. 
COMMERCIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Seniors 307 



Next to God we are indebted to 

women, first for life itself and then 

for making it worth having. — Bovel 




For here the men are men . . . 



f in 





-iT \,\ 




jJdl^ttii 'r 





COURTNAY CONNELL CHERYL CONNOLLY 



School of Education 
B.A, Human Development 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM H. 
CONNOLLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



BRIAN J. CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



THOMAS P. 
CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
;.A, Political Science 




DANIEL C. 
CONNORS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



ERIN C.CONNORS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CATHERINE M. 
CONRAD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



WILLIAM J. 
CONSIDINE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JENNIFER A. 
CONSTANTINE 

Arts & Sciences 
I. A. English/Political Science 



310 Seniors 



ROSSANNA D. 
CONTRERAS 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Economics/Philosophy 



ANGELA M COOK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ANDREW COONEY DAWN M. COOPER REBECCA S. COOPER 

Arts & Sciences School of Management Selnooi of Nursing 

B.A. Phiiosophiy/ B.S. Finance B.S. Nursing 
Communications 




DAVID T. COPUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




EDWARD M. 
CORVESE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KATHY A. 
COSENTINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ELIZABETH 
CORCORAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisl-1 



LOUISEMARIE E. er,n m. CORRIGAN 

CORCORAN Arts & Sciences 

School of Management B.A. Politicai Science 

B.S. Human Resources 



HUGH A. 
CORRIGAN 

Arts & Sciences . , 
B.A. Poiiticai Science 




Seniors 31 1 




CYNTHIA A. COSTA JULIE A. COSTELLO JULIA M. COVING 



School of Manogement 
B.S. Human Development 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JEANNE M. COX 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



NEDRA R. COX 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




ALICE E. COYLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANNA T. CRANE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



RAQUEL CRAUSMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DONALD R. CREAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LISA CREWE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 




JENNIFER J. 
CRISCUOLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CAROLYN A. 
CRISPINO 

School of Education 
B.A. English/Early Childhood 



ELISABETH M. 
CRONIN 

School of Education 
I. A. Human Development 



FRANK M. CRONIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Business 



KATHLEEN C. 
CRONIN 

School of Nursing 

B S Nursing 




WILLIAM D. CRONIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Sociology 



DANIEL J. CROSS LISA R. CROWELL 

School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Finance B.S. Business 



ERIN M. CROWLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JAIME M. CROWLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. French 



312 Seniors 



JOSEPH CROWLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



TERESA J. CROWLEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



JOSE V. CRUZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MONICA CSONGOR 

Schooi of Education 
B.A. Human Deveiopment 



REBECCA CUDD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psyctioiogy 





•i^i^ 



AMY J. CULLEN 


DANIEL F. CULLEN 


BRENNA P. 


ELLEN C. CULLINANE 


RICHARD T. 


Schooi of Management 
B.S. Accounting 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 


CULLINANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology/Philosophy 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 


CULLITON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Phiiosophy 




EDWARD JAMES 
CUOCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MAUREEN CURLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Classical Civilization 



JOHN J. CURRERI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting/Philosophy 



KEVIN JAMES 
CURSEADEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PAUL S. CURTIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




MARIBEL A. 
CUSTODIO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BARREH P. CYR 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KAREN P. CYR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DAVID C. 
DALESSANDRO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CONCEHA 
DAMORE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



Seniors 313 



LYNN M. D'JAMOOS TAMARA DABDOUB 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



JON-PAUL 
DADAIAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DAVID M. DAHAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Info Systems/Finance 



MAUREEN DAHILL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




GILBERT B. DAILEY MARYANNE DAILEY DARCEY A. DAKERS CHRISTINE M. DALEY 

School of Management School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.A. Human Development B.A. Sociology 



B.A. Political Science 



MARGARET 
DALMONTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




i^Mm 



PATRICIA DAMY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PAUL JOHNATHAN RICARDO J. DASILVA 

DARLING Arts & Sciences 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 




B.A. English 



JAMES A. 
DAVIDSON 

Arts & Sciences 
BA English 



ANN DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




JOANNA DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LISA J. DAVIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARJORIE E. DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MELISSA JO DAVIS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARK R. DAWSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



314 Seniors 



MAUREEN E. 
DAWSON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LAURA DE BRUX 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



EUGENE P. 
DE SIMONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LAURA DE BURX 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JAMES E. 
DECAESTECKER 

Arts & Sciences 
!.S. Biochemistry/Philosophy 




DAVID A. DECKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARY E. DECOFFE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



BRIAN P. DEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




CARLO DEFABRITIIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ZORAIDA R. 
DEFREITAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Linguistics 




PAULA J. 
DEGASPARRE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROBERT E. DEIGNAN 
JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economirn 




MELINDA J. DELA 
CRUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



DAVID R. DELANEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Seniors 315 




'■^•a? 





<;tV.Vv^ti:..» 



SifriencCis more than an acquaintance 
Much more than a BucCdy or a chum 
When others are too Busy to heCp you 
A good friend wilt always come, 

j? friend wiii stand Beside you 
In the sunshine as well as in storm 
In victory and in tragedy 
'Blow life's winds cold or warm 





316 Seniors 



jtv 



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A truefriencCis not found easily 
It is a titttt earned By few 
Of ate the peopCe you lUiCC ever Iqwiu 
1{§.aC friends xviCC numBer one or tzuo 

CoC[ea£ues and cohorts zoiCC come and go 
'But one relationship zvilC never end 
That is the Bond Between you and the one 
fou can honestCy caCC "my friend" 



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Seniors 317 



KERRIN E. DELANEY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



SUSAN DELANEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psychology 



ARTHUR L.. 
DELNEGRO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KELLY A. DELOREY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




MICHAEL J. 
DELWICHE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



LOREEN DEMELLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 




STEPHANIE L 
DENMARK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARK M. DENNEHY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ALEXANDRA M. 
DENNEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




CARA A. DENUCCIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



NICOLE M. 
DERAGON 

School of Education 
I. A. Human Development 



PETER J. DERBA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



DEBRA J. DEROIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



MICHAEL B. 
DESANCTIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, History 



318 Seniors 



i 



ROBERT A. DESANTIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



TODD DESCALA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



RALPH DESENA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICIA DESHALES 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 



GREGORY M. 
DESIMONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JOHN A. DESIMONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN R. DESIMONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Accounting 



KENNETH R. 
DESTEFANO 



ROSEMARY J. 
DEVILLA 



Arts & Sciences School of Management 

!.A. Philosophy/Economics B S. Accounting 



KRISTEN M. DEVIN 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




JOSEPH MARTIN 
DEVINE 

School of Management 



B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL R. DEWEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DAVID P. DIANA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN S. DIBARTOLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



RONALD DIBIASIO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




CHRISTIANE 
DIENHART 

School of Management 

B.S. General Management/ 

English 



ROBERT J. DIETRICH 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICIA A. 
DIGIACOMO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MAHHEW C. DILLON ROBERT M. Dl MASE 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors 319 





LISA DIMIDJIAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



GREGORY J. 
DIMITRIADIS 

Arts & Sciences 
A. English/Economics 




MICHAEL A. 
DINAPOU 

School of Management 
B S Finance 



KAREN S. DINDIAL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




HUGH G. DINEEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JANINE DIONE STEVEN G. DIPIETRO JASON S. DIPONZIO TODD A. DISCALA 1| 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



School of Management 
B.S, Finance/Marketing 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




CHELSEA L. DIXON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



DAWN C. DLOUHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science/Spanish 



TRUNG D. K. DOAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MICHAEL G. 
DOHENY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JAMES N. DOHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



320 Seniors 



SUSAN E. DOHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KELLY DOLAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL P. DOLAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KERRIE L. DOLCE 

Sclnool of Management 
B.S. l\/larl<eting 



RICHARD P. 
DOLCEHI 

Scliool of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




ERNANI SANTOS 
DOMINGO 

Arts & Sciences 



B.S. Biology 



CARMEN M. 
DOMINGUEZ 

Scliool of Management 



B.S. Marketing 




CARRIE L.. CHRISTINE DONAHUE 

DONAHUE Arts & Sciences 

. , o „ . B.A. Political Science 

Arts & Sciences 

i.A. English/Communications 



PATRICIA L. 
DONAHUE 

Sclnool of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



5RIAN M. DONNELLY 


SIMON G. 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 


DONOVAN 

Arts & Sciences 




B.A. English/Frencli 




\/IEGHAN H. DOODY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



BRENDAN M. 
DOOLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 




Seniors 321 




000^... 




KOOHYAR DOONEH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




HECTOR A. DOPICO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




JEANNE A. DORA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KIERAN M. DORAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy/Political 

Science 



JEFFREY S. DOREHI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MOLLIE A. 
DOUGHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 



CAROL DOWLING 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




CHRISTOPHER J. 
DOWNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JAMES A. DOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JAMES A. DOYLE 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JAMES J. DOYLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KIMBERLY D. DOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



322 Seniors 



/ILLIAM G. DRADDY DOUGLAS DREW 

School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL D. 
DRISCOLL 

Arts & Sciences 
I, A. History/Philosophy 



DEMISE M. DRISCOLL THOM A. DRISCOLL 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Elementary Education B.A. English 




3RIAN N. DROBNIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MUNGV. DU 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KRISTEN DUBE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KAREN S. DUBOIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



PETER DUBOSE 

School of Management 
B.S, Marketing 




MNMARIE M. DUFFY KAREN M. DUFFY 

School of Education School of Management 

B.A. Early Childhood B.S. Finance/Marketing 

Education 



KEVIN M. DUFFY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SHEILA A. DUGGAN 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



WILLIAM A. 
DUGGAN 

School of Management 
BS r'T^-^ing 




JOHN F. DUKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B A. Economics/History 



MARY E. DUMBAUGH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



JONATHAN M. 
DUNNICLIFF 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ERIC ANTHONY 
DUPRE 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 



DENISE M. DWYER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Seniors 323 



PATRICK DWYER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



TODD A. DZIEDZIC JOHN B. EAGAN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mattiematics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



DEBRA A. EAST 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



GERALD A. EATON 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Finance 




MICHAEL A. EATS ELLEN M. EBBERT JEFFREY R. EBERWEIN 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Arts & Sciences 
3. A. Mathematics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHRISTIANE S. 
EBSWORTH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CATHERINE E. 
EDMONDS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




ANNIE R. EDWARDS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



SEAN P. EDWARDS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CATHERINE M. EGAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

Communications 



MARK A. EGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



TIMOTHY F. EGAN III 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




BEVERLY EHINGER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



HAROLD J. 
EHRMANN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JON E. ELIAS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LESLI J. ELIAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MICHELLE M. ELIAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



324 Seniors 



II 



PHILIP M. 
ELIOPOULOS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LINDSAY A. ELLIOn 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



LISA C. ELLIOn 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Poiiticol Science 



GEOFFREY HENRY 
ELLIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JEFFREY M. 
ELLSWORTH 

Scliool of IVlanagement 
B.S. Accounting 




TODD ELMORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Phiysics/ Philosophiy 



DARREN JOHN EMERY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 



DAVID A. EMMA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marl<eting 



MOLLY F. ENDERLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JEFF B. ENGLISH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




JIM ENRIGHT 

School of Education 
i.A. Human Development 



CYNTHIA L ERRICO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology/Philosophy 




1ARIE DEL ROSARIO MARIANAS. ESPINO 

ESCOBAR School of Education 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 



B.A. Human Development 




Seniors 325 




326 Seniors 




Seniors 327 




CLAIRE ESQUIVEL SARNIA L ETIENNE 



Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Economics 




DANIEL M. FABITO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




DAVID M. FACENDA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



FRANK 
EVANGELISTA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ELIZABETH A. 
EYDENBERG 

School of Education 
i.A. Early Childhood Ed. 



ALYSSA A. FABIANI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 





REGINA A. FAGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CAROLYN M. FAHEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English /Psychology 



CAMILLE F. 
FAIRBANKS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DENISE M. FALCIONE WILLIAM E. FALLON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



328 Seniors 




JOHN M. FALVEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



EDWARD J. 
FANNING 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LIANA FANTASIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psyclnoiogy 



TRICIA FARINA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psyciioiogy 




CHRISTOPHER L. 
FARLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiiticoi Science 



SEAN M. FARLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



VIKKI L FARNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



STEVEN FATORA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Bioiogy 



SUSAN FAY 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 




AMY M. FAZENDIN 

Schooi of Education 
B.A. Eiementary Education 



STEVEN 
FEINSCHREIBER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. iHlstory /Economics 



DANIEL E. FENNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



THOMAS P. 
FERGUSON 

School of Management 
B S Marl<eting 



MONICA 
FERNANDEZ 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 




PATRICIA 
FERNANDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ROBERT J. FERNANDEZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



GEORGE J. 
FERRONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



CHRISTA M. FERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MICHELLE FILIP 

School of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 



Seniors 329 



SHEILA FINAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



BARRY R. FINCK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Poiitical Science/ 

Economics 




JEFFREY G. FINE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English! 



CAROL LYNN 
FINKLEHOFFE 

Sctnool of Management 
B.S, Marketing 



ELIZABETH J. FINN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages/ 

Frencti 



GEORGE R. FINN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




KAREN E. FISH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




DARLENE FISHER 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



DESMOND P. 
FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARTIN A. 
FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



PETER F. FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



scon w. 

FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



330 Seniors 



CHRISTY BETH 
FITZPATRICK 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DERMOTJ. 
FITZPATRICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SHEILA M. 
FITZPATRICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Classics 



ERIN FLAHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. IVlattiematics 




MICHAEL F. 
FLAHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



CHARLES R. FLATHER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 



KELLY J. FLAVIN 

Schooi of Education 
B.A. Eiementary Education 



LAURA FLAVIN 

Schooi of Nursing 
B.S, Nursing 




HUGH P. FLAHERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




JOHN P. FLEMING 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications/ 

Economics 




CONSTANTINE J. 
FLOROS 

Schooi of IVlanagement 
B.S. Accounting 




EVELYN M. FLOTRON 

School of IVlanagement 
B.S. Finance/ Marl<eting 



Seniors 331 





DEIRDRE A. FLYNN 

School of Education 
B,A. Elementary Education 



ELLEN M. FLYNN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




KATHLEEN M. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



VIRGINIA K. FLYNN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 




CHRISTINE A. 
FOGARTY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



SUSAN J. FOLAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CATHERINE E. FOLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



WILLIAM J. FOLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



KEVIN E. FONTAINE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




CHRISTOPHER R. 
FONTEYN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



332 Seniors 



LUIS J. FORASTIERI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JEROME W. FORD 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SUZANNE M. FORD KATHLEEN FORRESTER 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



1 



PETER J. FOX 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Operations 



JAMES M. FRALEIGH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



PAMELA LYNNE 
FRAME 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



SALVATORE E. 
FRAMONDI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



LISA M. FRANCIS 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




JENNIFER FRANKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



KIRSTEN L. 
FRANKENHOFF 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



CHRISTIE M. FRAVEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



BRIAN W. FRAWLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BRYAN S. FREEMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




JULIE R. FREGEAU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



PHILLIP FREMONT- 
SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 

;.A Music 



WILLIAM A. 
FRESHWATER 

Arts & Sciences 

I, A Political Science 



BARRY R. FRIES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CLARE M. FRIES 

School of Management 

B.S. Human Resource 

Management 




LAUREN A. 
FRITZINGER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOSEPH E. 
FRUSCIONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Accounting 



JODI A. FULLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Economics 



VALERIE FULLER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DAWN R. FUNAKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors 333 




JOSEPH J. FURINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



NANCY FURLONG 

School of Education 
B.A, Human Development 



LISA A. FURNALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHRISTINA M. 
GABRIEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Political Science 



OLETHA GABRINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




MARIA C. 
GAGLIARDI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Spanish 



MICHAEL T.GAINES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DEAN N A W. GAITO 

School of Education 
B.A. Secondary Education 



CATHERINE 
GALGON 

Arts & Sciences 
A Psychology 



JON V. GALLAGHER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




LAURA E. 
GALLAGHER 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Communications 



TODD E. GALLANT 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL V. GALLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



NICHOLAS 
GALLUCCI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



SANDY MICHAEL 
GALUPPO 

School of Management 
B S Finance 




JOSEPH R. GALVIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



BRIAN GANNON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



JULIE R. 
GARAGNANI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MICHAEL J. 
GARAWSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



BEATRIZ M. 
GARCIA-VELEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



334 Seniors 



ANA F. GARCIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHRISTINE A. 
GARCIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



FABIO GARCIA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



HORTENSIA 
GARCIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. French 



RAUL GARCIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




^ARA N. GARDNER 

School of Management 
B.S. Human Resources 



DEBORAH A. 
GARLAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



RUSSELL T. 
GAROFALO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 



MELISSA C. GARREH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



HEATHER E. 
GARRIGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Communications 




RIDGET R. GARRITY SUSAN A. GARRO DEIRDRE W. GASQUE FAY N. GAUTHIER JEFFREY R. GAUTHIER 



Arts & Sciences 
A, English/Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Communications 



School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JOHN F. GAVIN 


RICHARD M. 


KAREN M. GDOWSKI 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Russian 


GAZARIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DANNY GEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



LISA A. GENDRON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages/ 

French 



Seniors 335 




336 Seniors 







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Seniors 337 





TIMOTHY L. 
GENDRON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



GREGG W. GEORGE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KRISTIN E. 
GESHKEWICH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




PAOLO LUCA 
GIACOMO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARIE T. 
GIAMBANCO 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance/Marketing 



DOREEN MARIE 
GIAMMARCO 

School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood Ed 




ELIZABETH 
GIARRAPUTO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



KEVIN P. GILDEA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CYNTHIA J. 
GILHEANY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accountinq 



CATHLEEN GILL 

School of Management 
B.S. Business 



STEPHEN P. GILL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




JEFFREY S. GILLEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy/English 



KELLEY A. GILLESPIE 

School of Education 

B.A, Human Development/ 

Middle School Ed 



JENNIFER L. GILLEHE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



TERENCE D. 
GILUGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KRISTIN A. GILLIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



338 Seniors 



CIRSTEN GINSBURG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MOLLY GINTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANTHONY B. 
GIOFFRE 

Arts & Sciences 



B.A. Psychology 



DAWN GIORDANO RICHARD H. GIRARD 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




THOMAS P. 
GIUFFRA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ANTHONY M. 
GIULIANO JR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



VANESSA I. 
GLAMORE 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Communications 



MAHHEW J. 
GLENNON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KATHERINE M. 
GLOVER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




CERRY L. GNAZZO 

Arts & Sciences 
B A. Communications 



RENE M. GODBOLT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Seniors 339 



MARGARET ANN 
GOETZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology/English 



DONNA A. GOFF 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psychology 



JANICE M. GOGGIN KERRY M. GOGGINS 

Arts & Sciences Schooi of Education 

B.A, Politicai Science B.A, English/Secondary 

Education 



KIMBERLY R. GOLD 

Scliooi of Education 
B,A. Elementap/ Education 




scon W. GOLD GUILLERMO GOMEZ 



Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Poiitical Science 



Scliool of Management 

B.S. Finance/Generoi 

Management 



STANLEY GONG 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LINDA L. GONZALES 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing/Finance 



ALEXANDER A. 
GONZALEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




MARI E. GONZALEZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 



ELIZABETH M. 
GOODRICH 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



DIANE L. GOODWIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



MICHELLE M. 
GOODWIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



RAYMOND J. 
GOOLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




PATRICK T. 
GOONAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



340 Seniors 



ARTHUR L. K. 
GORDON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARY V. GORMLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CAROLINE GORSE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



JENNIFER J. GOSSET 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ELLEN E. GOUDEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



WALTER J. GOULA CHARLES E. GOYEHE 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.S. Biology B.S. General Management 



MICHELLE J. 
GOYEHE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JILL GRABOWSKI 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




DANIEL A. GRADY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




LINDA GRANT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




1ADELINE J. GRANT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



ELIZABETH C. 
GRADY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MAUREEN GRALTON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JILL E. GRANT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LESLIE L. GRANT II 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 




Men, in general, are but great children. 

- Napoleon 



Seniors 341 





CLIFTON A. 
GRAYER III 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




ALICE A. GRAYSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




ANGELA M. 
GRAZIANO 

Sctiool of Management 
l,S. Marketing 



ANDRE GREEN 

Sclnool of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RITA F. GREENE 

Sct^ool of Management 
B.S. Management 



ANN M. GRENIER 

School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 



RANDY E. GRENON 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education/ 

English 




DIRK A. GREUUCH LAURA A. GRICUS JILLIAN T. GRIFFITHS PETER N. GRIMES 



School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Operations Management B.S. Finance 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL J. 
GROGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



342 Seniors 



PHILIP H. 
GRONDIN JR 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KIRSTEN B. GROSS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



MEGHAN E. GROSS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



PHILIP G. GROVES CHARLES F. GUERRA 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Accounting/Economics B.S. Biology 




DEANNA M. 
GUESMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ADAM GUILD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CHRISTOPHER C. 
GUNDERSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



MARY ELLEN GUNN 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary/Moderate 

Special Needs 



LISA M. GUTHRIE 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 




MALINKA K. 
GUTIERREZ 

Arts & Sciences 
!.A. Political Science 



STEVEN M. GWOZDZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



scon E. HABEEB 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science/ 

Philosophy 



JUDITH A. HAFNER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PATRICK M. 
HAGGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




STEPHEN J. 
HAGGERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Political Science 



EUGENE HAHN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



WILLIAM J. HAJJAR 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICIA L. HALE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. German/French 



DENNIS J. HALEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Seniors 343 




EDENIA E. HAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psychology 



RICHARD C. 
HAMPSON JR 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JON G. HAMPTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Spanish 



AUCEMARIE HAND 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SEAN P. HAN LEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 




JENNIFER HANLON LOIS M. HANRAHAN 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Sociology B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM G. 
HARDEN 

Arts & Sciences 
BA Philosophy 



AMY M. HARDIMAN DENISE HARDING 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Social Sciences 



School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JENNIFER HARDY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



GAYLIN P. 
HARGRAVES 

Arts & Sciences 



B.A. Studio Art/Commicatn. 



STEVEN D. HARMON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CHRISTOPHER 
HAROOTUNIAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



VALERIE J. HARRELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




JOSEPH P. 
HARRINGTON JR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



344 Seniors 



TERI M. HARRIS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science/ 

Economics 



KATHERINE D. 
HARRISON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CELINA A. 
HARSHMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



EUGENE P. HART 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



PATRICIA M. HART 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DARLENE HARVEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Political Science 



COLLEEN R. HASEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



GEORGE C. HASKELL 

School of Management 
B.S, Marl<eting 



KARA L. HASKELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 




MARK P. HAHON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DONNA HAUSER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



VIRGINIA M. HAWE 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



MARY ANN 
HAZELTON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marl<eting 



BARBARA A. HEALEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 




CYNTHIA M. HEANEY JENNIFER M. HEBERT DANILO C. HEBRON GRETCHEN C. HEEG 



Arts & Sciences 
i.A. English/History 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ROBIN HEFFRON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MARGARET A. 
HEGARTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SHELLY L HEISEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



TODD HELMBRECHT 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



EDWARD P. 
HENNEBERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ARTHUR A. 
HENNESSEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Seniors 345 





JOHN E. HENTSCHEL TARA G. HENWOOD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



NICOLE J. HERBST 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




DEBRA J. HERMAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARK A. HERMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



DIANE M. 
HERNANDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B A. Political Science 





%mk 



MARTIN E. 
HERNANDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics/Philosophy 



DAVID E. HEROLD 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 



JEFF A. HESS 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Political Science 



JOSEPH HESS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID M. HESSION 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




DOUGLAS HICKS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIE E. HICKS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Communications 



ELIZABETH A. HIGLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



BECKY L. HILTUNEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN G. HINES 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



346 Seniors 





THOMAS MINES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KATHLEEN M. HITE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES P. HOBAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANTHONY HOBBS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



MICHAEL J. 
HOLLAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




ROBERTA E. TERESA M. HOLLAND 

HOLLAND School of Management 

Arts & Sciences ^'^^ Marketing/Psychology 

..A. Communications/Spanish 



LISA HOLLINS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KELLY A. HOLT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LAURIE M. HOLTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 





NANCY J. HOMYAK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ELISABETH E. 
HORAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



SARA HORNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KENNETH F. HOSEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Accounting 



ROBYN M. HOUSTON 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



HEATH D. HOWE 

School of Education 
B.A. Middle School Education 



Seniors 347 



PATRICK J. HOWLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 



ROBERT J. HOY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology/Economics 



SARA M. HUBERTY LYNNE M. HUDSON 

Arts & Sciences School of Education 

B.A. Economics B.A. Elementary Education/ 

Special Education 



LORI S. HUEBENER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




CAROLYN M. 
HUGHES 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



MICHAEL L HUGHES JEFFREY S. HUME 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Economics B.S. Marketing 



SARAH E. HURD 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



NHUTX. HUYNH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




JENNIFER HYNES CHRISTINE M. lANELLI 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.A. Psychology 



DEBORAH J. 
lANNACONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CRAIG F. lANNINI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



OK HYUNIM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/Philosophy 




JOSEPH INDELICATO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT D. 
INDRESANO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 



MELKA S. INGRAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




JAMES J. lOVINO RICHARD M. IRONS 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A. Computer Science 



348 Seniors 




ELIZABETH M. JACK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Communications 



NATALIE A. 
JACKVONY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARYANN 
JAKUBOWICZ 

School of Education 

i.A Human Development 



CARLOS A. 
JALOWAYSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DEBRA J. JANACEK 

School of Education 
B.A Human Development/ 

Speech 




JENNIFER L 
JANNOPOULO 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 



BRIAN A. JARMAIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



PAUL JASINKIEWICZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBERT A. 
JASMINSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



SANTI JATIBUNDHIT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy/ 
Communications 



Seniors 349 




DAMARIS W. JAVIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S, Biology 



JAMES 
JEAN-PIERRE 

Arts & Sciences 
!.A, Poiiticol Science 



LAURA M. JEFFERS 

Schooi of Education 

B.A, Early Cliildhood 

Education 



THEODORE M. 
JENKIN 

Sctiool of IVIanagement 
B.S. Finance 



JILL M. JENKINS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/Economics 




JEFFREY T. JERRIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JULIANA E. 
JOHNSON 

Sctiool of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

Communications 



KATHRYN JOHNSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisti 



BRENDA L 
JOHNSTON 

Scliooi of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH A. 
JOHNSTON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



350 Seniors 




CRAIG M. JONES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 




JOHN D. JONES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



LUKE R. JORGENSEN KRISTINE M. JOSEPH 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Englisln/Communications B.S. Biology 



ROBERT R. JOSEPH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MICHAEL MARKO 
JOVANOVICH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



PAUL M. JOY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



ROBERT P. JOYCE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBERT JOYLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Business 



KATHLEEN S. JUAN 

Arts & Sciences 

..A. Mathematics/Computer 

Science 




JILL A. KACZYNSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID T. KADE 

School of Education 
l.A. Human Development 



MAHHEW J. 
KADNAR 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Philosophy 



STEPHEN A. 
KAESTNER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A, Philosophy 



KAREN A. KALOKIRA 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education/ 

Philosophy 




MICHAEL P. 
KAMMER 

Arts & Sciences 
5. A. Psychology/Management 



ROBERT C. 
KANARD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CLAUDIA L. KANDOU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



BRIDGET KANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOHN F. KANE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors 351 




ANDREW R. 
KARPINSKI 

School of Management 
BS Marketing 



JOANNA KASELIS SAMUEL ANDREW ELISABETH KASSABGI PEARL-LYNN KASSIN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KASPER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Communications 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




CHRISTINE M. 
KAUFMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



FRANCES 
KAUFMANN 

Sctiool of Management 



B.S. Marketing 



MAJA-USA D. KEANE JOHN J. KEARNEY 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Englisti B.A. Political Science 



VINCENT D. 
KEARNEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




LORI KEARSLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARTIN J. KEAVENEY RUTH C. KECHEJIAN 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.A. Sociology 



MARTHA L. KEENAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARGARET M. 
KELLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 





JENNIFER KELLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



352 Seniors 



MAUREEN KELLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ROBERT S. KELLEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



AILEEN E. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTINE KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CLINTON R. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ERIN M. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiiticol Science 



JANA P. KELLY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JENNIFER M. KELLY 

School of Management 

B.S. Operations/Strategic 

Management 



JOHN C. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MAUREEN KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MICHELLE A. KELLY 

School of Education 
B.A. Middle School Education 



PAUL D. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ROBERT M. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



THOMAS M. KELLY JR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




WILLIAM J. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHRISTOPHER L. JAMES M. KENNEDY 



KELTER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PATRICK F. 
KENNEDY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



RANDAL A. 
KENWORTHY 

School of Management 
B.S. Info Syst/H R Mgmt 




JANET A. KERWIN 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



AFARIN KETURI 

School of Management 
B.S. Business Administration 



CHRISTOPHER M. 
KEYES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ELIZABETH A. KEYS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



FRANUNDA MARIE 
KHUON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



Seniors 353 




PAUL D. KIELY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MARIN L KIESAU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ALBERT S. KILDANI 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



MARY KILLIZLI 

Scliooi of IVlanagement 
B.S. Marl<eting 



DEBRA KILLMON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psyct^ology 




CAROL ANN KINAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



KATHRYN W. 
KINSELLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CANDICE A. KIRKILES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JEFFREY M. 
KIHLESON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ANDREW T. KLARE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



354 Seniors 




JEFFREY KLAUS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KATHRYN E. KLECAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Socioiogy 



SUSAN SHEA KLEIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 




IAN C. KLIMON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



PAUL E. KNAYSI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CORINNE A. 
KNOBLACH 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




Take two and call me in 
the morning! 




LISA A. KOCHOL 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education/ 

Theatre Art 



JENNIFER K. KOH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



REIKO KOJIMA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICIA A. 
KOLENDA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



NICOLE K. KONDI 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 




IRENE KONTJE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy/ 
Communications 



POONEH KOOHYAR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ALLISON KOPICKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KIRSTIN A. KORN 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



PAUL R. KOVACEV 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors 355 



GEORGE E. 
KOVATCH 

School of Management 
i.S. Human Resource Mgmt 



JILL S. KOWALSKI ANDREW M. KRAMER JENNIFER A. KREEFT 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Communications 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JULIE E. KRESS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




MICHAEL T.KROTINE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KIM C. KROVITZ 

School of Monogement 
B.S. Finance 



BETTY KU 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting/Information 

Systems 



MICHAEL R. 
KUCHLER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Comp Science 



ALEXANDER G. 
KULEVICH 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 





TAMARA L. KULLMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Latin 



KIM KURKER 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood/ 

Elementary/Mod Sp Needs 




ADRIENNE C. 
KUSMIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CHEE KING S. KWOK 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



356 Seniors 



1 




GRACY M. KWON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 



ALEXANDRA 
KYRANIS 

Arts & Sciences 
.A. Political Science 




KIM M. LABARBIERA LARA M. LABESKY 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 





MARIANNE N. 
LACROIX 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



GREGORY L. LADD JACKEUNE LAFUENTE ANTHONY 

School of Management School of Management KOON-TUNG LAI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



B.S. Finance/Operations B.S. Finance/Human Resources 



DOUGLAS B. LALLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




MARY EILEEN 
LAMBESIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



MARK LAMORIELLO LYNN LAMSON 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Arts & Sciences 
3. A. Mathematics 



DEIRDRE LANDERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JOHANNA M. 
LANDRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Seniors 357 



MAUREEN E. LANE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing/Human 

Resource Management 




GLORIA \. LARA 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Communications 




GARY M. LARKIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Englishi 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
LANGWAY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Communications 



ROBERT LAPENTA 

Sclnool of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MELISSA LAPIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Engiish 




My future's so bright I gotta wear 
shades! 



ROBERTA LAPON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




MICHAEL A. 
LARHEHE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychiology 




JEFFREY N. LAROCHE 

School of Management 
B.S, Marketing 




ANGELA C. LAROSA 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A, Economics 



358 Seniors 



JEAN C. LASCOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A, Economics/Philosophy 



LAURA LASHER 

School of Education 

B,A, Early Childhood 

Education 



MARY K. LASTORIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Germanic Studies 



DAVID LAVALLEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



MELISSA LAVEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. French 



KIMBERLY LAVOIE KRISTEN K. LAWLER 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A, Communications/History B.A. Art History 



ERIN A. LAWLESS 

Sctiool of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 




MARY P. LAWLOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




HEATHER L. LEAHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




ROBERT F. LEARY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



STEPHEN M. LEAVEY JEANNE LEDWELL 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S, Marketing B.A. History 



ARTHUR LEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marl<eting 



KIMBERLY A. 
LAWLESS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psychology 




THOMAS LE CLAIR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KRISTIN M. LEARY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Political Science 




CHI FUN LEE 

Arts & Sciences 
!,A, Communications 



Seniors 359 



DEBORAH ANNE LEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



HELEN LEE 

Scinool of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 



KEVIN F. LEE 

Schooi of iVlonagement 
B,S, Finance 



MARY K. LEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiitical Science 



NANCY A. LEE 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Engiisin/American Studies 




ROBIN D. LEGALLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biociiemistry 



ELIZABETH S. LEGARE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



LESLIE A. LEI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 



AIMEE EUSE LEM 

Sctiool of IVIanagement 
B.S. IV]arl<eting 



PETER LENHARDT 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/History 




AMANDA C. 
LENNON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




HEATHER LEWIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 



360 Seniors 



CATHERINE 
LEON-DISPENA 

School of Management 
i.S. Business Administration 



LAURA LEONARD 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



SARAH LEV 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



DIANE 
LEWANDOWSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
;.A Mathematics 




JACQUELINE M. 
LEWIS 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Mathematics/Psychology 



KATHERINE E. LEWIS 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing/Human 

Resource Management 



PATRICIA M. 
LEYDEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



SANDRA M. LEYNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BENJAMIN LI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PHOEBE L. LIBARLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S, Biology 



ERIC D. 
LICHTENBERGER 

School of Management 
B.S. Info Systems/Marketing 



TRAGI E. LIGHT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JUDY L LIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




SARA LINN 

School of Management 

B.S. Human Resource 
Management/Economics 



NORMAN A. LIPPEH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ALISON J. LIHLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SARA LITZENBERGER 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



AMY J. LIVOLSI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




MAHHEW C. 
LOCHEHO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH R. LOCKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S, Biology 



ELAINE S. 
LOCKHART 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LOUISE E. LOFRISCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Communications 



THOMAS R. 
LOFRISCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 




THOMAS W. LOGAN 

School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 



STEPHEN A. 
LOMBARDI 

School of Management 
B,S, Accounting 



MAURA A. LOONEY 

School of Management 

B,S, Information Systems/ 

Economics 



JOSEPH A. 
LOPARCO 

Arts & Sciences 
!,A, Economics/Philosophy 



GEORGE 
LOPEZ-BALBOA 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Economics 



Seniors 361 



DEBBIE J. LORUSSO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL R. 
LOSTOCCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



JOANNA M. 
LOUGHUN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



SHELBY E. LOVEH 

Arts & Sciences 
!.A. Engiish/Politicol Science 



MARC J. LOVINGS 

Schooi of IVlanagement 
B.S. Marketing 




PAUL EDWARD LUCY KRISTIN E. LUDLAM 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. English B.S. Accounting 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
LUGOSSY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



THOMAS LUMSDEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KATRINA D. LUSSI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 



362 Seniors 



KRISTY K. LUTZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KEVIN A. LYLES 

Sctiooi of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ANN MARIE LYNCH 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



BRIAN J. LYNCH 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CAROL J. LYNCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




KELLY A. LYONS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL C. LYONS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Classics 



THOMAS J. LYONS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARY C. LYSTER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




TRICIA ANN LYNCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



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1 



CHRISTINA M. LYONS 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




JOSEPH M. 
MABARDY 

Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Political Science 



Seniors 363 



ROBERT E. 
MACAU LAY 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 



JOHN C. 
MACDONALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOSEPH G. 
MAC DOUGALL 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S. Finance 



EVELYN MACHIN 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 




Keep smiling, keep shining, knowing you can always count on 
me, for sure. That's what friends are for. 



ELINOR MACKIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




DOUGLAS P. 
MACNEIL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




EILEEN P. MADAUS 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 




ROBERT R. MADDEN TARA L. MADDOCK 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.A. Psychology 



DANIELLE 
MAGGELET 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CARA J. MAGGIO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



IAN P. MAHONEY 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



364 Seniors 



JOHN D. MAHONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MAUREEN E. 
MAHONEY 

School of Management 



B.S. Accounting 



THOMAS R. 
MAHONEY 

Arts & Sciences 



B.A. English 



TRINH K. MAI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARK T. MAINELLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN MAIRO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



STEPHANIE C. 
MAISTRELLIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOHN MALCONIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SAVIN A MALLOZZI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ELIZABETH A. 
MALONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



FRANCINE MANDELIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



PETER O. 
MANDEVILLE 

Arts & Sciences 

{'• A riiilosophy 



MICHELLE M. 
MAILLOUX 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ALI MALEKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




DEIRDRE A. 
MANGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




rRED V. MANGANO 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting/Information 

Systems 



MARY P. MANION DAVID W. MANN 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 

B.S. Information Systems/ 

Finance 



MARC A. MANOLI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LYNNE MARCIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors 365 




LISA G. MARCOS DAVID E. MARCOZZI STUART L. MARCY POLLY J. MARGULES 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biociiemistry 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Engiisli 



MARISA A. 
MARINIELLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




JOSEPH D. 
MARINILU 

Sctiooi of IVIanogement 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL J. MARINO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



JAMES L. 
MARKS JR 

School of Management 



B.S. Operations 



JENNIFER MARNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



RICHARD T. 
MAROONEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Philosophy 




JULIE K. MARREN LAURA A. MARRONE 

Arts & Sciences School of Education 

B.A, English B.A. Elementary Ed/Human 

Development 



SEAN R. MARSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Political Science 




MAUREEN E. PAULA L MARSHALL 

MARSHALL school of Management 

„ . I , r J i- B.S, Accounting 

School of Education ^ 

B A Early Chldhd/Specioi Ed 




REBECCA L. 
MARSHALL 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Sociology 



ROBYN E. MARTELO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 



LEANN MARTIN 

School of Nursing 
B.S, Nursing 



LESLIE A. MARTIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT A. MARTIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



366 Seniors 



ANTHONY D. 
MARTI NE 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 



LOREHA MARZULLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology/Italian 



JULIE C. MASAITIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




mtiJt^^kl 



STEPHANIE C. 
MASSARI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHELLE A. 
MASSICOHE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




RICHARD A. 
MASTRODICASA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



STEPHEN 
MASTRORILLI 

School of Management 
B.S. Comp Science/Finance 





KRISTY MATHEWS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marl<eting 



^♦'t^*^^ 



AMY M. MATSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




STACIE K. 
MATSUMOTO 

Arts & Sciences 

3. A. Political Science/ 

Philosophy 



ELIZABETH M. MATYS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology/History 



MARIA J. MAVRO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DAVID P. MAY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



JUSTINE MAY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



Seniors 367 



PATRICE M. MAYE JENNIFER A. MAYER 

Arts & Sciences School of Education 

B.A. Engiish B.A. Eiementary Education 



CHRISTINA N. 
MAYR 

Arts & Sciences 
.A. Psychoiogy 



PAULA MAZZAFERRI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




PATRICK J. 
MCCAFFREY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ALLISON C. MCCALL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/French 



WILLIAM F. 
MCCARRON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



BERNADEHE 
MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ROBERT M. 
MAZZIOHA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




DANIEL R. MCCABE 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MAUREEN DOWNES 
MCCABE 

Arts & Sciences 
B A. Social Science 




CHRISTINE 
MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



368 Seniors 



DANIEL P. 
MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



KAREN K. 
MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 
S.A. Communications 



KEVIN G. 
MCCARTHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English! 



JOHN R. 
MCCARTNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



KEITH A. MCCLANAN 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 




LISA K. MCCOLLUM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 



MARGARET B. 
MCDAVID 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Germanic Studies 



ELIZABETH M. 
MCDONALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CATHLEEN M. 
MCCONVILLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SHAWN T. 
MCCORMICK 

School of Education 
B.A. Secondary Education 



MARY C. MCCUE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



NEIL P. MCCULLAGH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




JEREMIAH J. 
MCDERMOn 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICK W. 
MCDERMOn 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poll Sci/Communications 



MICHAEL J. 
MCDEVin 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MICHAEL J. 
MCDONALD 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



STEPHANIE A. 
MCDONALD 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MICHAELS. 
MCDONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



DEREK T. 
MCDONALD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A SocioliTiy 




KEVIN J. 
MCDONOUGH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Seniors 369 




370 Seniors 




Seniors 371 




JAMES H. 
MCELWAIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANTHONY MCENROE 

Sc|-iooi of Management 
B.S. Finance/I\/larl<eting 



ROBERT C. 
MCENROE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A History 



BRIAN R. 
MCGILUCUDDY 

Schooi of IVIanagement 



B.S. Information Processing 



LEE A. 
MCGILUCUDDY 

School of Management 



B.S. Accounting 




JAMES J. MCGINTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CHRISTINE E. 
MCGLONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BRIAN D. 
MCGOVERN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ELLEN MARIE 
MCGOVERN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KRISTINA M. 
MCGOVERN 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




THOMAS E. 
MCGOVERN 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



MARGARET L. 
MCGRAW 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science/French 



JOHN MCGUIRE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



ANN MCINTYRE 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



HEATHER MCINTYRE MICHAEL D. MCKAY 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



372 Seniors 




JILLJ. MCKILLOP 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DAVID E. 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



GEORGE F. 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 




JUDITH A. 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARIA C. 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Politicai Science 



MAHHEWT. 
MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
3. A. English/Philosophy 





MARY C. MCLELLAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



PATRICK T. 
MCMAHON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



KATHLEEN M. 
MCMANUS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM F. 
MCMANUS JR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



CARY MCMILLAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




KATHERINE 
MCMORRAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MEGHAN A. 
MCMURTRIE 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

English 



MICHAEL F. 
MCNALLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SHAUN M. 
MCNAMARA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



GEORGE D. MCNEAR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, History 



Seniors 373 



TIMOTHY J. 
MCNULTY 

School of Management 
B.S. Information Systems 



KRISTEN MCOSKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ERIN K. MCVERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



RAFAEL Q. MEDINA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JEFFREY P. MEDLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy/Economics 




ELIZABETH C. 
MELAHN 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education/ 

Philosophy 



PAUL R. MELVIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 



PHILIP F. MEMBRENO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MAHHEW H. 
MERCER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MAHHEW 
LAWRENCE METZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



374 Seniors 




KRISTOFER W. MEYER PETER A. MEYERS 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




BLAIR E. MIICKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




CHRISTINE Y. MIKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PETER P. 
MICHALOWSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



DARYL A. MICHALS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LEO A. 
MIERZWICKI II 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





MARGARET MILES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



SUSAN J. MILES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOSEPH M. 
MILITELLO JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MORGEAN L. 
MILKOFSKY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BRIAN L. MILLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Seniors 375 



KATHLEEN A. MILLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Mathematics 



CHRISTINA L 
MILLEHI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Classical Civilization 



JEFFREY C.MIMS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



TIMOTHY A. 
lyilNAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CYNTHIA M. MINER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. French/English 




ERIC MINGORANCE LAUREN MINIHANE JON R. MiNZNER 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A, Social Science B.S, Biology/Mathematics 



CHRISTINA L 
MITCHELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MICHAEL O. 
MITCHELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




TODD M. MITCHELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



YOLANDA F. 
MITCHELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B A '^orioloqv 



GREGORY R. 
MOELLERING 

Arts & Sciences 
R A Economics/Psychology 



scon MOFFAH 

Arts & Science 
B.A. Political Science 



CAROLYN 
MOHEDANO 

Arts & Sciences 
BS Biology 




FREDERICK J. 
MOLFINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 



PABLO I. MOLINA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



PATRICIA MOLLOY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



THOMAS 
MONAGHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 



DEBORAH E. 
MONAHAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



376 Seniors 



KRISTI E. MONTEI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




THERESA MOORE 

Sclnool of Education 
B.A, Secondary Education 




LAURA 
MOORHEAD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CATHERINE M. 
MOOTOS 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



JEROME L 
MONTRONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ELIZABETH G. 
MOODY 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



CHRISTOPHER S. 
MOORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



LISA MOORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




^e'U drink^and dance with one hand free..,, 




KATHLEEN M. 
MORAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICK M. MORAN ROBERT WENDELL 

Arts & Sciences MORAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



B.A. History/Political Science 



LUCIANO M. 
MORELLI 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 



Seniors 377 




AMY MOREY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



KAREN L. MOREY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



CHRISTINE MORGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LISA MORGAN 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 




PEGGY MORIN 

School of Education 
i.A. Elementary Education 



KELLIE A. MORONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CAROLINE MORRIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHARLES E. 
MORRIS III 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Communication^ 



GEORGE B. MORRIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KATHERINE M. 
MORRISSEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



TIMOTHY R. MORSE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PHILLIP A. MORTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CAROLINE D. 
MORTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Psychology 



THOMAS J. 
MOSCARILLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



378 Seniors 



HOLLY A. 
MOURADIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CHRISTINE 
MOYNIHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SUSAN M. 
MOYNIHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MANUEL 
MUCHACHO 

School of Management 



B.S. Finance/Marketing 



HAVEN MUENCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




MARLA F. MULARSKI 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



HEATHER M. 
MULCAHEY 

Arts & Sciences 



B.A. English 



MICHAEL CHARLES 
MULE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KRISTIN A. 
MULGREW 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



ELIZABETH P. 
MULLAUGH 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




KRISTEN M. 
MULLIGAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 


RICHARD T. 
MULLIGAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 


MOIRA B. 
MULRONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 


JONATHAN D. 
MULROONEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 


MEGAN S. 
MULROONEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




HEATHER M. 
MUNROE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JAMES P. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARY ELLEN 
MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology/Philosophy 



MAHHEW B. 
MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MAURA K. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



Seniors 379 




MEGHAN MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



PATRICIA MURPHY 

School of Education 
B.A, Elementary Education 



TERESA MURPHY 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



WILLIAM J. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



BRENDAN D. 
MURRAY 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 




CAROLINE C 
MURRAY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



STEVEN M. MURRAY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



scon ANDREW 
MUSHKIN 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. History 



MARK J. MUSIAL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PATRICIA MUSTO 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 




USA-MARIE M. 
NAMPHY 

Arts & Sciences 
!.A. English/American Studies 



MICHAEL R. 
NANGLE 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. History 



PATRICIA NARCISSE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ELLEN G. NASH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SHALINI NATH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




TON! J. NAYLOR 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JEANNE-MARIE 
NEAULT 

School of Education 

B.A, Secondary Education/ 

English 



ROBERT S. NEDDER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



AMY L NEIDHARDT 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



AMY B. NELSON 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



380 Seniors 



HEMING NELSON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science/ 

Economics 



JEFFREY A. NELSON 

School of Management 
B.S, Economics 



KENNETH S. 
NEWHAUSER 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



DOUGLAS P. 
NEVIERA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JEAN A. NEWELL 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




CHRISTINE NGAU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



NHAHU NGO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



TRANG T. NGO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CANDACE N. 
NICHOLS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARIA M. NIELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors 381 




TIMOTHY J. NIEMAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



DONALD L NISS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 



MARGARET E. 
NOCERO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Spanish/Italian 



MICHELLE NOEL 

Scliool of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DAVID M. NOLL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biociiemistry 




KELLY M. NOONAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PATRICE M. 
NOONAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiisti 



KARL D. NOONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



PETER G. 
NORTHGRAVES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



SHEREE L NUCCIO 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




VALERIE C. NUCCIO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science/ 

Communications 




DUANEJ. NUNES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



382 Seniors 





CHRISTOPHER 
O'BRIEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JANET O'BRIEN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



WILLIAM SEAN 
O'BRIEN 

School of Management 
B.S. iVIarketing 



CHRISTINE A. 
O'CALLAGHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LISA M. NUZZOLO 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



L:lJ, 



TIMOTHY P. 
O'BANNON 

School of Management 



B.S. Computer Science 



DEIRDRE W. 
O'CONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




MARY DANA 
O'CONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SHANNON M. 
O'CONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



TIFFANY A. 
O'CONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHRISTOPHER M. 
O'CONNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



NEIL M. O'CONNOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 



Seniors 383 



THOMAS A. 
O'CONNOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KATHLEEN S. 
O'DONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiisti 



SEAN P. O'DONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BRIAN P. 
O'FARRELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SUZANNE D. 
O'HALLORAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




SEAN T. O'HARA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



BRIAN P. O'KEEFE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/Economics 



BRIAN T. O'KEEFE 

School of IVianagement 

B.A. Finance/Information 

Systems 



PETER G. O'KEEFE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KEVIN C. O'LEARY 

School of IVianagement 
B.S. Finance 




MAHHEW D. 
O'LEARY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KAREN M. O'MALLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science/ 

Psychology 



MEGAN O'MALLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MARGARET K. 
O'NEAL 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DONNA M. O'NEIL 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




CHRISTOPHER D. 
O'NEILL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



DAVID M. O'NEILL JEFFREY C. O'NEILL MARY KATE O'NEILL VINCENT T. O'NEILL 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Arts & Sciences 
;.A. Communications 



Arts & Sciences 
3. A. English/Communications 



Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics/Political 

Science 



384 Seniors 




TIMOTHY E. 
O'REGAN 

Arts & Sciences 



B.A. History 



KATHLEEN OROURKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



MARGARET 
OROURKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MARGARET M. 
OTOOLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CELESTE J. OLIVA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




MONIQUE OLIVIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Independent Studies 



ERIC S. OLSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



JOHN C. OLSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engilsh/Phliosophy 



KAREN M. OLSON 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

Philosophy 



LAURA OLSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




JAMES GERARD 
ONGJR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



RICHARD J. 
ONORATO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CATHERINE 
ONOYAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



HEDYC. 
ORDOUKHANIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science/French 



CAROLINE M. 
ORQUIOLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B S Biology 




JAIME ORSINI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LYNN M. ORVIETO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ANAMIRTA OTERO ANA MARIA OZAETA DAISUKE OZAKI 

School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.S. Marl<eting B.A. English/Communications B.S. Finance 



Seniors 385 





ALICIA PACIFICO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JOHN D. PADILLA 

Sciiool of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JUAN EDUARDO 
PADILLA 

Schooi of Management 
BS Oper/Strat Mgm1/Fin 




STEPHANIE L. 
PAGANO 

Sclnool of Management 
B S. Economics 



DEBRA A. PAGE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiitical Science 



LYNN M. PAGE 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 




CHRISTINE T. PAGLIA 

Schooi of Management 
B.S, Finance 



JOHN R. 
PAGLIARULO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JEAN GALLIGAN 
PALLONE 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Business Administration 



HEATHER A. PALMER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
PALMISANO 

Arts & Sciences 
BA Psychology 




KAREN P. PALTING 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JUUANNA PANG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



LINDA A. PAONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JACQUELINE G. 
PAREJA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



BRAD C. PARISEAU 

School of Management 
B.S. Marl<eting 



386 Seniors 



MIHWA PARK 

School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 



PAMELA PARKER 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



AMY E. PARKES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANTHONY PARLATO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



JAMES M. PARLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




KIMBERLY A. 
PARSONS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 



RENE S. PARUNGAO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MARIA PARZYCH 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




KARLA M. PATIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ELIZABETH 
PATNAUDE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



HARRY PATZ JR 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




STACY N. 
PAZIENZA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



BRENT R. PEACOCK 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



DENISE PELLETIER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



BETH M. 
PASQUERELLA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JENNIFER PATEREK 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 




Seniors 387 








MABEL L PENA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psychology 



INDIRA PEREZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. French 



VERONICA PENA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DAVID G. PENN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Poiitical Science 



THOMAS D. PENQUE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MAHHEW M. 
PEPLOWSKI 

School of Education 
I. A. Secondary Ed/Biology 




LIXY PEREZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DAVID J. PERGOLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANDREW P. PERINI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARIO R. PERRONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




BRIDGET K. PERRY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHRISTINE E. PERRY 

School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 



KENNETH M. PERSEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ROBERT C. 
PESCATORE 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 



WILLIAM J. PESSIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




JAY A. PETERSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JILL C. PETERSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOANNE M. 
PETERSON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



REBECCA A. 
PETERSON 

School of Education 

B.A, Elementary Education/ 

Psychology 



AMYM. 
PETRAGNANI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



388 Seniors 



KAREN PETRECCA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DEREK E. PETREY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ELIZABETH A. PEHIT 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ALLISON K. PEZZULLO 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



ANN M. PFEIFFER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




NINA S. PHILLIPS BRUCE G. PICARD 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/Economics 



JOCELYNE E. 
PICARD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LISA PICCARELLI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



BROOKE A. PICOHE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/French 



Seniors 389 



ANDREW J. PIELA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JAMES MICHAEL 
PIERCE 

Scliool of Management 
B S Finance 



EMILY PIERRE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psyclnology 



MURIEL PIERRE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. French 



KATHLEEN A. 
PIGNONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




ANN PILCHER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



THOMAS M. PILLERI MELINDA PIMENTLE 

School of iVIanagement Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Accounting B.A. Mathematics 



LILLIAN I. PINET 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



STEPHEN JOSEPH PIN! 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 




LORI L PINKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ANA MARIA 
PIS-LOPEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



COLEHE V. PISCITELU 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



NATALIE 
PLACHTER 

School of Nursing 



BS Nursing 



DAMIAN R. PLATOSH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting/Philosophy 






PATRICIA A. 
PLUMMER 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



Jn^KM ^3 



MARY GRACE POE MAHHEW A. POGGI 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Political Science B.S. Finance/Economics 




ROBERT A. POHL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHRISTOPHER L. 
POIRIER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Marketing 



390 Seniors 



CHRISTINE S. 
POKOLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



TIZIANA E. A. 
POLIZIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 



JENNIFER I. 
POMERANTZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



TERRY L. POOLE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DOUGLAS P. POON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




SARAH E. POPE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LORI K. POPOVICH 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance/Human Resource 

Management 



JOSEPH L. POSCH III 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education/ 

English 



MARC E. 
POSTIGLIONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL P. POTH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




LYNN A. POWERS 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



MARY E. POWERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LAURA M. PRANTIL 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KATHLEEN A. 
PRASSAS 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



ERIN S. PRESCOn 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Independent Studies 




MICHAEL J. 
PRIMIANO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



GREG M. PRIOLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications/English 



ROLAND S. 
PRITCHEH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL R. 
PROTEAU 

School of Education 
B.A. Secondary Education 



PAUL K. PRUNEAU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Seniors 391 




CHRISTY A. 
PRUNELLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JANET L. 
PRUTZMAN 

Sct^ooi of Nursing 
BS Nursing 



VINCENT PUCILLO 

Sciiooi of Management 
B.S, Finance 



KIMBERLY M. 
PUNSALAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Politlcai Science 



JENNIFER L PYNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 




JOHN F. PYNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiitical Science 



AMY B. QUAIL 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S, Finance 



ELLEN QUAHRUCCI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 



JENNIFER A. 
QUINLAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SHEILA A. 
QU IN LI VAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Economics 





ANDREA QUINN 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Accounting/Finance 



KEVIN M. QUINN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




KRISTAN QUINN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICK M. QUINN 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



392 Seniors 




KIM QUINONES 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



CASEY A. QUIRK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 





HEATHER QUIRK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Classics 



MICHELLE B. 
RABELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisti 





o*T<^ «>l 


1 


■ 


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■^ ^ V '<^- J 


K'«» 




\ 


A^ 


I 






-i- 




1 * ■* 



ELISABETH M. 
RAINGE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



LEETA 
RAMSUNDAR 

Schiool of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHELLE T. 
RAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



RICHARD S. 
RANGE 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 




ENEE RABENI 


MARTIN J. 


SANDRA J. 


MICHAEL L 


MARIA RAFFI 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 


RACANELLI 

School of Management 

B.S, Finance 


RADULA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Commuriications 


RAFFERTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 


School of Management 
B.S. Computer Information 




MARK R. 
RASMUSSEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



Seniors 393 



■■^^0^^' 





JOHN V. RAVENNA LYNN E. RAWDEN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PETER D. RAY 

Arts & Sciences 
l.S. Biology/Philosophy 



HENRY E. REA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTOPHER R. 
REARDON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




SUSAN REBELLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




STEPHEN E. 
RECUPERO 

Arts & Sciences 
BS Biology 




(Don't go zuftere tHe -paths Lead. Instead, go ivftere thzm is no 

-path andttavt a trait. 




CLARENCE E. 
REDD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JOHN M. REDMON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 



DANIEL B. 
REDMOND 

School of Management 
B.S. IVlorketing 



ELIZABETH A. 
REGAN 

School of Education 
i.A. Human Development 



LAUREN A. REGAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



394 Seniors 



MICHAEL E. 
REGNELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MICHELLE M. 
REHMANN 

School of Management 
B.S. Morketing/Econonnlcs 



DEBORAH ANNE 
REICH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Mathematics 



KEVIN J. REID 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



TRICIA A. REID 

School of Management 
B.S, Accounting 




KEVIN C. REIDY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



AILEEN D. REILLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ANDREW K. REILLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Political Science 



JOHN C. REILLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MICHELLE E. REILLY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




MARGARET 
REINERMAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



LISA M. REINHARDT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LANCE S. RELICKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science/ 

Philosophy 



RICHARD W. 
RENEHAN 

Arts & Sciences 

A, Communications 



ELIZABETH S. RENICK 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 




MAHHEW E. 
RENOLA 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Communicotions 



KRISTEN A. RENZI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



BARBARA J. RESCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JUAN P REYES 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics/Finance 



YVONNE REYES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Seniors 395 




JENNIFER A. RHODES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Art History 



JILL D. RHODES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. IVIathematics 



EDWARD W. RICCI 

Scliooi of IVlanagement 
B.S. [Vlarl<eting 



PAUL RICCIARDELLI 

Sclnool of IVlanagement 
B.S. Finance/Marl<eting 



KENNETH J. RICCIOU 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




LAURA L. RICHARDS 

Sclnool of IVlanagement 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICIA A. 
RICHARDS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KIMBERLYA. RICHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ANDREA M. 
RICHO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisl-i 



JENNIFER K. RICHTER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




GREGORY P. RICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



EYMARD B. RIEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



COLLEEN M. RIELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



scon F. RIGOUNI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LINDA F. RIMINI 

School of Management 
B.S. Business 




DAVID W. RIMMER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



396 Seniors 



ANN E. RINALDI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Women Studies 



KATHLEEN A. 
RINALDI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



SHEILA E. RING 

School of Education 
i.A. Elementary Education 



TABATHA RIORDAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary/Moderate 

Special Education 



DAVID L. 
RIOS-UZCATEGUI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JEFFREY R. RISTAINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology/Psyclnology 



THOMAS M. 
ROACH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Englisin 



ALEJANDRO 
ROBAYO 

Arts & Sciences 
S.A. Computer Science 



CYNTHIA A. ROBERTS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




)ONSA L ROBINSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



KATHERINE E. 
ROCA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



HEATHER M. ROCHE KERRY M. ROCHE 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English B.A. Sociology 



ALBERTO PAZ 
RODRIGUEZ 

School of Management 
B.S, Marl<eting 




CLAUDIA M. 
RODRIGUEZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SUZEHE RODRIGUEZ ADAM S. ROESER DONALD P.ROGERS JACQUELINE M. 

School of Management School of Management School of Management ROGERS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



B.S. Accounting 



B.S. Accounting 



B.S. Finance/Operations 




ROBYN L. ROGERS SHARON K. ROGLER SIOBHAN ROHAN 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.A. English B.A. Communications 



KATHLEEN A. 
ROKOSZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



REY L. ROLDAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Seniors 397 





AA^^ 



JENNIFER E. ROLFE LAURA L. ROMAN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



TERRI L. ROSS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LISA M. 
ROMANOVITCH 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Philosophy/Economics 



FRANK J. ROMEO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOHN J. RONAYNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy/Studio Art 




DENNIS ROSSI JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



MAnHEW V. 
ROSWELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



TIMOTHY A. 
ROTH FUSS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



STEVEN S. ROUSTA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



398 Seniors 




MARY E. ROWLEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



RANDI A. RUBIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID E. 
RUMBALSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



JENNIFER A. 
RUNKLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psychology 



STEVEN A 
RUNNING JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




MEGAN M. RURAK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Political Science 



MARY ANNE 
RUSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




DANIEL J. RUSK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics/Philosophy 



TEODORA RUTA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 





SHERRY K. 
RUTHERFORD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/Political Science 



GERARD A. 
RUTIGUANO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CHRISTOPHER L 
RUYAK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



DESMOND M. 
RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Biology 



KATHLEEN T. 
RYAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors 399 




MELISSA M. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MICHAEL H. RYAN 

Scliool of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



PETER J. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Politicai Science 



THOMAS R. 
RYLANDER 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BIJAN J. SABET 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 




ANDREW SAGE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MILENA B. 
SAGRAMOSO 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL M. SAHADY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiiticai Science 



DONNA SALANITRI 

Schooi of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JEANNEHE A. SALAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy/English 




SOFIA SALAZAR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SEAN M. SALENE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Histor/ 



SHERI SALERNO 

School of Education 
B.A. Eiementory Education 



GREGORY C. 
SALVAGGIO 

Schooi of Management 
S, Finance 



MARY V. SAMBUCHI 

Schooi of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

English 




KRISTI M. SAPIA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



400 Seniors 



MAURICIO A. 
SAMPER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MAHHEW T. 
SAMSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Fine Arts 



LARA M. SAN 
GIOVANNI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LINDA R. SANFORD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DEIRDRE 
SANSEVERINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Communications 



ERMANNO P. 
SANTILLI 

Sctiool of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL D. SANTUCCI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



GREG C. SARIAN ALYCIA L. SARJEANT 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




CHERYL L. SARO 

Schooi of IVlanagement 
B.S. Finance 




LORI A. SASSO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisli 





MICHAEL T. SATO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psyci^ology 



JOHN M. SAVAGE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Englisln 



ROBERT J. SAVILLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiitical Science 



RICHARD M. 
SAVINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



THERESA SCHAEFER 

Schooi of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Seniors 401 



DIANA L. SCHNIHKA 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Political Science 



HERBERT D. 
SCHOFIELD II 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance/Marketing 



MICHELLE 
SCHOLEFIELD 

Arts & Sciences 
PS CK mi.lrv 




ANDREA C. 
SCHAFFNER 

Arts & Sciences 
BS Biology 



ERIC A. SCHATZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MEGHAN M. 
SCHMELZER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theater Arts 



WILLIAM J. SCHNEIR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




ERIN K. SCHORNACK 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN F. SCHULTZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




MELISSA M. SCHWAB 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



402 Seniors 



PAULA M. 
SCHWARTZBAUER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



LEE E. SCIABA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MONICA 
SCONGOR 

School of Education 
I. A. Human Development 



KIMBERLY M. SCOH 

School of Management 

B.S. Human Resource 

Management 



STACi A. scon 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



NANCY L. SEITZ 

Schooi of (Vlanagement 
B.S. Business Administration 



JOHN J. SELLECK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



scon D. SELLERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CHRISTINE Y. 
SEUBERT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 




STACI D. SEWELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARK J. SEXTON 

School of Management 

(.S. General Management/ 

Philosophy 




FREHIWOT L 
SEYOUM 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



EILEEN SHAEVEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



HIRAL N. SHAH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KERRIE M. 


SUSAN Y. 


SHAHEEN 


SHAMOTO 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


B.A. English/Communications 


B.A. English 




ROBERT O. 
SHANNON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JAMES A. SHAVER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




Seniors 403 




THOMAS SHAW 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 



CHRISTOPHER S. 
SHAY 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



ERIN K. SHAY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



TERRENCE B. 
SHEA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MONICA SHEEHAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development/ 

Philosophy 




LAUREN E. SHEEHY 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood 

Education 



scon c. 

SHERMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KEIKO SHIRAISHI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CHRISTINA T. SHUM 

School of Management 

B.S. Human Resource 

Management 



ALISON B. SHYER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




STEPHEN SIEH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JENNIFER A. 
SILVERNAIL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



PETER K. SIMMANG 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



RHONDA J. 
SIMMONS 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Psychology 



JON S. SIMON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




TODD A. SIMONS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Operations 



CHRISTY SIMPSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Information Systems 



PETER K. SIMS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MONICA SINGH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/French 



REENA SINGH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



404 Seniors 



i 



ANGELA 
SIRACO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Italian 



JULIE M. 
SISKOWIC 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CATHERINE M. 
SITAR 

Arts & Sciences 
B. A. Communications 



AMY SITZER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



GEORGE 
SKABARDONIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JULIE SKALINSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




CHRISTOPHER A. 
SKELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



STACY A. SLAHERY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MAHHEW J. SLEAR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



KENRICK P. 
SKERRin 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A, Communications 



ELIZABETH M. 
SKOCZYLAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



KAREN E. SLAHERY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology/Philosophy 




I never lose sight of the fact that 

just being is fun. Katherme Hepburn 



Seniors 405 




406 Seniors 




AMY E. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DAVID W. 
SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DORIS M. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JACK C. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




ANTONIA 
SCARES 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Political Science 



JENNIFER J. 
SCLDANC 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JAMES M. 
SCLCMITA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KEITH L 
SCLCMCN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JACQUELINE M. 
SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




JENNIFER K. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




LUCY K. SNYDER 

School of (Vlonagement 
B.S. Economics 




MAURA B. 
SOMERS 

School of Management 
B.S. l\/larl<eting 



408 Seniors 



OLIVER H. SOMMER 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



NANCY SOOHOO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ARNOLD C. 
SOOKRAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



HEIDI B. SORENSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MELISSA 
SOTOMAYOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Studio Art 




WILLIAM C. 
SOUK AS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



GHADA SOUSOU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



LORENA P. 
SPADANO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



SHAUN B. SPENCER JOHN SPIELBERGER 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. History B.S. Marketing 




MICHELLE F. 
SPINALE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KURT D. SPINDLER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



AMY L SQUIRE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHERINE 
ST. GERMAIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, History 



RICHARD M. 
ST. GERMAIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 




MICHELLE A. 
ST. PIERRE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



JILLS. 
ST. MARIE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CATHERINE A. 
STADTLER 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



DENISE STAHLIE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



SUSAN STEDEM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Seniors 409 








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410 Seniors 





Seniors 41 1 




ONA A. STEELE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PETER C. STEIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT P. 
STEPHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



STEPHANIE STILLMAN DAVID M. STOKES 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Early Childhood B.A. Economics 

Education 




STEPHEN G. 
STONEHOUSE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics/Economics 




JONATHAN A. 
STOVALL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Economics 




We were killing time. We were young and 
restless, we needed to unwind. -Bryan Adams 




PASQUALE 
STRACCIA 

Arts & Sciences 
(.A. Political Science 



BERNARD T. 
STRADLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Languages 



LESLIE STRAZZULLO 

School of IVIanagement 
B.S. Finance 



MARY KATHERINE 
STRECKER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT B. STRONG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



412 Seniors 



HEATHER STROUT 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JENNIFER A. STRYKER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEVEN M. STUMP 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



JACQUELINE M. 
STURDIVANT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



ANNE M. SUDBAY 

School of Education 

B.A, Elementary Education/ 

English 




NANCY E. SULICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



BRIAN J. SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 



BRIAN R. SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/French 



CATHERINE B. 
SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Political Science 



CELIA M. SULLIVAN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




CHARLES D. 
SULLIVAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ELIZABETH M. 
SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, History 



KAREN B. SULLIVAN KELLY A. SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. Psychology 



MICHAEL J. 
SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psychology 




PETER M. SULLIVAN SHEILA A. SULLIVAN 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathemotlcs 



SARAH L. 
SURPRENANT 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance 



MARY K. 
SUTHERLAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KRISTIN I. 
SWANHAUS 

School of Education 
i.A. Human Development 



Seniors 413 




MARJORIE A. 
SWANTON 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



ANN T. SWEENEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



BRIAN SWEENEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



NEIL SWEENEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DAVID W. SWIFT | 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




DANIEL P. SWITEK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Geology 



CRAIG J. 
SZCZEPANSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theatre/French 




ANNE L 
SZCZEPKOWSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A Economics 



CRAIG 
TAGLIAMONTE 

Arts & Sciences 
BA Ef-^nomics 




l^te onCy way to Have a friend is to be 
one. --Emerson 




MICHAEL J. TAKACS 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance/Economics 



414 Seniors 



DAVID J. TANG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S, Biochemistry 



TERESSA A. 
TANGREDI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



KELLY A. TAPLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Communications 



MAUREEN R. TARBELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



MARYAM 
TAVASSOLI 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



MARY ROCHELLE F. WILLIAM H. TEASLEY 

yg School of Management 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Psychology 



B.S. Marketing 



MARY E. TENN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LISA E. TERRANOVA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




JULIE M. TEVIS 

School of Education 
B.A. Secondary Education 



AMUL R. THAPAR 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics/Philosophy 



TRAVIS J. THAYER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/Philosophy 



TRACY THISTLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



GISEL D. THOMAS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARIE T. THOMAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



SHERIN E. THOMAS TRACY L. THOMAS KEVIN B. THOMPSON 



Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Communications 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Seniors 415 










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Seniors 417 



CHRISTINE 
THORNTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



THOMAS M. THORPE WALTER F. TIMILTY 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A, italian 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Politicai Science 



JOHN C. 
TIMMERMAN 

Schooi of iVIanagement 
B.S. Marketing 




Lift is to 6e fortified By many friends flips. To Cove and to Be 
Coved is the greatest happiness of eTQStence. - -Sidney smitu 



WILLIAM A. TING 

School of Management 
B.S, Finance/Marl<eting 



BARTHOLOMEW 
TOENSING 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CHERYL A. 
TOLENTINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 






KRISTIN A. TOLI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



418 Seniors 



MAHHEW T. TOLKIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



scon F. 

TOMINOVICH 

Arts & Sciences 
I. A. English/Poiitical Science 



BAO-THY N. TON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing/French 



KATHLEEN R. TONER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ANDREA TOPITZIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



CHRISTINE L TORRES 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MARTIN R. 
TOURIGNY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MICHELE L TOWLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SHAWN M. TOWLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




PAMELA TOWNSEND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



TIMOTHY W. 
TOWNSEND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



AINHAN M. TRAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



THANH TRAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics/Economics/ 

Philosophy 



ALLISON TRANI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theatre Arts 




CHRISTINE R. 
TRAVASSOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



MICHAEL B. 
TRAYNOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS R. 
TRAYNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



KIRIAKI ANDREW C. TRIPODI 

TRIANTOPOULOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Political Science/French 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




SUSAN TROCCIOLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MAHHEW DAVID 
TRUE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MEREDITH 
TRUEBLOOD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MOLLY TSCHIDA JOANNE M. TSOTSOS 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Seniors 419 




NICOLE JEANNE 
TUFO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Computer Science 



BRENDA J. TULLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psyctioiogy 



CARRIE A. 
TUTERA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



GORDON TUTHILL 

School of IVlanogement 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN C. TUZIK 

School of Management 
B.S. i\/larl<eting 



TERRI TYNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



KERRY P. TYSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



STEPHEN M. 
UDAGAWA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JENNIFER L 
UEBLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




ALAN K. UEOKA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LESLIE A. ULMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Philosophy 



SANDRA T. URIBE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROMAN J. USCHAK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOHN E. UTSCH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



420 Seniors 



ANDREA V. UTZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Psychology 



DONNA T. VAIANI 

School of Management 
B.S, Business 



RAYMOND E. 
VAILLANCOURT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology/Psychology 



NANCY I. 
VALLANCOURT 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



BARBARA J. VAN 
ALLEN 

School of Education 
B.A. Secondary Education 




JOHN M. VANCE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History/Philosophy 



WILLIAM A. 
VANDENBERGJR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



GREGORY P. VARGA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



CHRISTINE 
VARVARO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



NIKOS 
VASILAKOS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




TIFFANY 
VASILIK 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 



GINA M. 
VASSALLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARY 
VASSALLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MICHAEL K. 
VAUGHAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KELLI-ANN 
VAUTOUR-AREKLEH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English/Psychology 




DANIELA 

VAZQUEZ- 

FIGUEROA 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KAHY M. 
VAZQUEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



MARIA VEGA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD 
VEGA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



DONNA 
VELDRAN 

Arts & Sciences 
!.A. Communications 



Seniors 421 



DOMINIQUE VERDIEU 

Arts & Sciences 
B,A. Communications 



CRISELDA M. 
VERGARA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, Psyclnoiogy 



MICHELLE L 
VERZILLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. IVlathematics 



THOMAS E. VIEIRA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ANDREA J. VIENT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 





MAHHEW C. P. VILES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Engiish 



ANTONNEHE 
VILLAFLOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Art History 



JAMES VILLANI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiiticai Science 



STEPHEN G. VIRTUE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



STEVEN G. VITALE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy/English 




RICHARD F. 
VITARELLI 

Arts & Sciences 
?.A. English/Spanish 



PETER R. VLERICK 

Sclnooi of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID T. VOGHT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Poiltlcoi Science 



JOSEPH L 
VOLPICELU 

Arts & Sciences 
i.A. Communications 



ALEXANDRA VON 
AUENMUELLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




GINA M. 
VONOEHSEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Poiiticai Science/ 

Philosophy 



CATHERINE E. VOUTE 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



INDRADEVI 
VYRAVANADAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



RONA WADLE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



scon J. 

WAGGONER 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



422 Seniors 



i 




CATHERINE M. WAHL 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ED WAINGORTIN 

Scliool of Management 
B.S. Finance 




J^riends are friends forever! 




DANNY WAJSMAN 

Sciiool of IVlanagement 
B.S. Finance 



ANTOINEHE 
WALDRON 

Schooi of IVlanagement 
B.S. Marketing 



JANET T. WALKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English) 



JANINE WALKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



MARIE D. WALKER 

Sctiool of Management 
B.S. Business 




STEPHEN C. WALKER LEONARD F. WALL 



Schiooi of Management 

B.S. Computer Science/ 

Finance 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KEVIN P. WALLS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ANNE M. WALSH 

Schiool of Education 
B.A. Secondary Education 



BRIAN M. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychiology/Music 



Seniors 423 




424 Seniors 




Seniors 425 




JOHN J. WALSH THOMAS J. WALSH I 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. English B.S. Finance 




ROBERT T. WARNOCK 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




JODI L WASIK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychoiogy 



DEANNA A. 
WALTERS 

School of Education 
i.A. Human Development 



DEBRA J. WALTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




Before we end and then begin, we'll 
drink a toast to how it's been. 

-Billy Joel 



DEBRA WARDLOW 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




SUSAN E. WARREN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




TUTASI K. WATERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology/Philosophy 




COURTNEY J. 
WATSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theater Arts/English 



ADRIENNE L 
WEAVER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARY A. WEI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



KURT R. 
WEINSHEIMER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English 



JULIE A. WINDER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



426 Seniors 



STEPHEN M. WELLES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LORI A. WERNIG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



SARAH A. WERTH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology/Plnilosophy 



ELIZABETH A. WEST 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



PAMELA WEST 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



f^aciL. \ 



^^'kiMMi 




CATHERINE M. 
WEYMOUTH 

Sctiool of Education 
i.A. Elementary Education 



BRIAN E. WHALEN THOMAS L. WHEELEN NANCY WHEELER CANDICE E. WHITE 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science/ 

Philosophy 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




LEONARD S. WHITE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



BRENDAS. 
WILKINSON 

Arts & Sciences 
S.S. Biology/Philosophy 



ELIZABETH A. 
WILLARD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ROBIN L. WILLET 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education/ 

Mathematics 



DANEILLE WILLIAMS 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 




KEVIN R. WILLIAMS JAMI T. WILLIAMSON 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. French B.S. Nursing 



COURTNEY H. 
WILSON 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



CYNTHIA M. WILSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL A. 
WILSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Seniors 427 



KATHERINE E. 
WINKLER 

School of Management 
B,S, Accounting 



SEAN M. WIRTJES 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



NANCY L WISDOM BRIAN WOGENSEN 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English B.A. English 



CHRISTOPHER C. 
WOJCIK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics/Philosophy 




KRISTA WOLFE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Spanish 



ROSA WONG 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



WENDY WONG 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES M. WOOD DONALD M. WOODS 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy/Economics B.A. Mathematics 



428 Seniors 



CARLA WORTH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




NANCY B. WUNNER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing/Economics 




ROBERT J. WYRSCH 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ANNE MARIE 
WREN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



STEPHAN J. WRONSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



LILY WU 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting/Marketing 



MELINDAWU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




It is a mark of intelligence, no matter what 
you are doing to have a good time doing it. 




LAURA XAVIER 

School of Education 

B.A, Early Childhood/ 

Moderate Special Needs 

Education 



CARINA YAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



LAURI ANNE YAO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CHRISTINA L 
YATSUHASHI 

Arts & Sciences 
5. A. Communications 



JULIE YEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Seniors 429 




430 Seniors 




Seniors 431 




And yet I do not doubt that the most 

important things are always the best 

remembered. -Henry Van Dyke 




ROBERT S. YOUNG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



SUSAN A. YOUNG 

Scliooi of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ALYSE M. 
ZACCHEO 

Scliool of Management 
B S Finance 




SARAH J. YEZZI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, English/French 



JIHYUN Yl 

Schooi of Management 
B.S. Economics/Marl<eting 




C. DALE YOUNG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Bioiogy/Englisin 



CHARLENE M. 
YOUNG 

Arts & Sciences 
B A. Engiish/Psychoiogy 




CHRISTOS 
ZAHARAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B A Engiish 



DONALD A. 
ZAMORA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English! 




MARIE H. ZASO 

School of Education 
I. A. Elementary Education 



STEPHANIE 
ZEHREN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Speech Communications 



MARY E. ZEIT 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance/Information 

Systems 



PAUL A. 
ZGURZYNSKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ERIC M. 
ZIMELMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Communications 



432 Seniors 



\ KATIE B. ZIPFEL 

: School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JULIE M. 
ZISSIMOPOULOS 

Arts & Sciences 
I. A. Spanis|-i/Poiitical Science 



CHRISTOPHER 
ZOIDIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KRISTA ZUBER 

Scliooi of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




We laughed until we had to cry. 
We loved right down to our last goodbye. 



JOSEPH ZUCCOLA 

Sciiool of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



EDWARD S. 
ADOLPH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MICHELLE J. 
ALTHOFF 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



NEAL AMARAL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




CAROLYN GRACE 
ABEL 

School of Management 
B.S. Business 




RACHEL BETH 
BAINBRIDGE 

School of Management 

i.S. Business Administration/ 

Marketing 



ANNE BILODEAU 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Seniors 433 



STILL 





AFTER ALL 
THESE YEARS! 



We're getting older as 
time goes by, a iittie 
with every day. 

We were ttie oiiildren 
yesterday. 

— Cat Stevens 




436 Seniors 




Seniors 437 




438 Seniors 




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Seniors 439 



We have lived and loved together 

Through four changing years. 

We have shared each others' gladness 

And wept each others' tears. — 




440 Seniors 




And let us hope the future 

As the past has been will be. 

I will share with you my sorrows 

And you your joys with me. 



Seniors 441 





Thomas M. Smith 
"Tom" 



5^^ Sept. 29, 1969 — 
M- Jon- ll. 1991 





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Lauren M. Meaney 

April 29, 1969 - August 8, 1989 



444 Dedication 



"We are, all of us, molded and remolded by 

those who have loved us: 

No love, no friendship can ever cross the 

path of our destiny without leaving some 

mark upon it forever." 

- Kahlil Gibran 



t 



T 



the 



OK IN 



ag iite; lei 



\inbrose 



Some (Peop[e 

Come into our tives 

andqidckiygo. 
Some stay for awhile 

and leave footprints 

on our hearts, 
and we are never, 

ever the same, 

- ^lavia 



Theresa L. Tobin, of Brighton, Ma., passed away on August 4, 1988, the summer 

after our freshman year. She courageously battled, since age 12, a diagnosis of 

systemic lupus erythematosis, a disease attacking vital tissues and blood vessels. 

Though she was a part of the B. C. community for only a short while, her 

intelligence, perserverance, courage, and beautiful smile continue to be 

I remembered by those who knew her. Most remembered are her wonderful love for 

her family, a great sense of humor, and her loyal support of Boston sports. In this, 

she exemplified all the ideals that we as members of the Class of 1991 have sought, 

bund, and developed over these past years. Theresa will be in the wind beneath our 

! wings as these Eagles are now ready to soar to new heights. 

I- Rita Casey, Class ofVl, 
in memory of Theresa Tobin 



Dedication 445 



mh TisiDPDrQ IBdmdlfiKetlcDir 



r 



Although the excellence of Sub Turri would not be possible without the talent and 
dedication of the all-volunteer, all-student staff, the quality of the book also depends 
on the financial support of parents and friends. Since Sub Turri is an organization 
independent from the University, we receive neither University funding nor a portion 
of the activity fee to defray our production costs. Thus, Sub Turri depends on the 
donations of many people as patrons and benefactors in order to produce a quality 
memory book at an affordable price for students. The staff of Sub Turri would like to 
extend its most sincere gratitude to parents, friends, faculty members, and alumnae 
who so generously contributed to the 1991 edition of Sub Turri. 



/ /;■ — ^ 



Special Friend Benefactors 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles C. Corcoran Marianne & Sal Trani 

Mr. & Mrs. Ray J. Groves Rocco R. Tutela, M.D. 

Ramon & Cecilia Llamas 



f. 



% ^ ^J 



\ 



446 Patrons and Benefactors 



^ 



^ 



Gold Benefactors 



Mr. & Mrs. R.E. Angelica 
Bruce & Angela Angelini 
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Antino 
Dr. & Mrs. Norman W. Barton 
Mr. & Mrs. Anthony J. Bertolino 
Rolf A. Classon 
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Connor 
Judi & Paul Devin 
Marie & Jim Dimitriadis 
Mrs. Christopher F. Dlouhy 
Dan & Marilyn Dolcetti 
Mr. & Mrs. John M. Doody 
Mr. & Mrs. William E. Ebben 
Robert & Mary Giuffra 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard N. Hart 



Mr. & Mrs. Lee A. Hiltunen 
Mr. & Mrs. Alfredo Jalowayski 
Dr. & Mrs. G.R. Kaestner 
Angelo John Lorusso, M.D. 
Dr. & Mrs. Orlando J. Martelo 
Mr. & Mrs. Louis J. Martine 
Dr. & Mrs. Richard J. Moore 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Morris sey 
Dr. & Mrs. Gerardo Pis-Lopez 
Anna-Mary & John Riley & Family 
Dr. & Mrs. John A. Rurak 
Richard Russell 
Arlene & Peter Slear 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Sullivan Jr. 



# 



% 



Silver Benefactors 



Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Boron 
Dr. & Mrs. Henry Colella 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard S. Covino 
Dr. & Mrs. Richard B. Culliton 
Dr. & Mrs. Alfred M. Donovan 
Henry & Gena Maggio 



^ 



Deborah K. Markson 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul M. Montrone 
Mr. & Mrs. James J. Murphy 
Dr. & Mrs. Michael A. Nocero 
Dr. & Mrs. M.W. Pettit Jr. 

Congratulations & Best Wishes Mary Vassallo, from 
Mom & Dad 



J) 



Patrons and Benefactors 447 



/T 



^f 



Christiane Adler 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank P. Aitelli 

David Aquino 

Dr. & Mrs. Alfred F. Arcieri 

Sonia Arajuo 

Dr. Kenneth J. Arruda 

Patricia J. Augenthaler 

Mr. & Mrs. Calvin F. Baker 

Mr. & Mrs. J.G. Bartels 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert M. Bassett 

Mr. & Mrs. James A. Beckmann 

Carol O. Behrman 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Bellows 

Mr. & Mrs. D. Bevere 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Bodio 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard N. Bohan 

Mr. & Mrs. Tim Borden 

Paul & Nancy Breen 

Dr. & Mrs. C. Edward Brennan Jr. 

Dr. & Mrs. William Brereton 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Brown 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Bryan Jr. 

Dr. & Mrs. Charles Buckley 

Thomas E. Bums 

Dr. & Mrs. Patrick R. Calabrese 

C.A. Catanese 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Carillo Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Carter 

Bill & Mary Casey & Family 

Kenneth S. Cemak 

Dr. & Mrs. Roger Chabra 

Dr. Alfonso Chauez 

Mr. & Mrs. Warren Cheesman 

Francis & Gail Civille 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Colclough 

Dr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Cole 



Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. Jerome P. Connolly 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Connor 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Connors 
Robert J. Connolly 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul R. Corrigan 
Mr. & Mrs. John R. Cosentino 
Rebecca Cudd 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Russell Cullen Jr. 
Dr. & Mrs. Edgardo C. Custodio 
Dr. & Mrs. Edward Dailey 
Jean A. Davis 

Vincent & Franca DeFabritiis 
Jorge & Carmelita DeFreitas 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul F. DeGasparre 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Deignan 
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. DelNegro Jr. 
Rita & Rino DiBartolo 
Richard & Mary Lu DiMase 
John & Maria Donahue 
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel A. Dupre 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Dwyer 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Egan 
Mr. & Mrs. Harold Ehrmann 
Joan & Ronald Ellsworth 
The Fallon Family 
Marie & Frank Fantasia 
Edmund & Christine Fares 
Patricia C. Fernandez 
Mr. & Mrs. C. Fleissner 
Tom & Joyce Flynn 
David & Mary Forrester 
Dr. & Mrs. Gerard J. Foye 
Stephen Furbacher 
Dr. & Mrs. John P Galgon 
Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas Gallucci 
Mr. & Mrs. Allan E. Gandler 



% 



m 



448 Patrons and Benefactors 



f 



=^ 



Patrons 



Dr. & Mrs. R.J. Garofalo 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo R. Gauthier 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Giarrapusto 

Mrs. Alan R. Glueck 

Jerome Goggins 

Walter & Geri Goula 

Mr. & Mrs. Maurice Goyette 

Eugene & Margaret Grabowski 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip Griffith 

The Grogan Family 

Robert & Joan Habeeb 

Eugene H. Hahn 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Hanlon 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Hanrahan Jr. 

Paul & Marilyn Hardiman 

Joyce & Bruce Hardy 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Harrington 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Harootunian 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Helin 

John & Joan Hernandez 

Lawrence & Nancy Hines 

Tim & Sue Hopkins 

Charles & Judith Hurchalla 

Sarah E. Hurd 

Dr. & Mrs. Riaz Hussain 

In Joyful Remembrance of Robert J. Hildreth 

"Dziadzi" 
Mr. & Mrs. Vincent J. Jacob 
Atty. & Mrs. Robert Frank Jakubowicz 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Janacek 
Tony & Lennis Jones 
Mr. & Mrs. Francis E. Kaczynski 
David Thomas Kade 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kashgegian 
Mr. & Mrs. Juergen Keil 
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence E. Kelley 



Mr. & Mrs. James Moore Kelly 
Mr. & Mrs. Michael D. Kinsella 
Dr. & Mrs. E.S. Kondi 
Mr. & Mrs. James M. Kulcher 
Mr. & Mrs. Albert Kurker 
Mr. & Mrs. Roger Kusmier 
Arlene Lajoie 
Alan L. Landridge 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Larkin 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Lavallee 
Mr. & Mrs. James J. Lawlor 
Suk Hyung Lee 
Selena & Charles Lein 
Mr. & Mrs. James F. Lennon 
Thomas L. Leyne 
Mr. & Mrs. George M. Linn 
Dr. & Mrs. William Lovett 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul E. Lucy 
Mr. & Mrs. J. David Lyons 
Irene & John Maddocks 
Atty. & Mrs. Richard J. Maggi 
Dr. & Mrs. Edward Mahoney 
William & Joan Mahoney 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Mairo 
Kathleen Mamphy 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank A. Marcos 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard Marooney 
Mr. & Mrs. Donald J. Martineau 
Mr. & Mrs. B. Mastrodicasa 
Mr. & Mrs. William F. Mayr II 
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur M. McClure 
Mr. & Mrs. John E. McDonald 
Mr. & Mrs. J.H. McElwain Sr. 
Mr. & Mrs. R. Bruce McLane 
William F. McManus & Family 
Philip & Monica McMorran 



Patrons and Benefactors 449 



(^ 



Patrons 



Drs. Denis & Else Membreno 

Bill & Alice Mercer 

William J. & Ruth M. Meyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul R. Miles 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Minella 

Mr. & Mrs. W.C. Mortenson Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Alain Moulle-Berteaux 

Jack Mouradian 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Mulligan 

Mary Murphy & Family 

Barbara & Martin Murphy 

Lisa Namphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Nedder 

Steve & Liz Niss 

Dr. & Mrs. John Niziol 

Jocelyn & Colin O' Brien 

Geraldine F. O'Connor 

The O'Hara Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond J. O'Keefe & Family 

Donald & Barbara O'Neil 

Mr. & Mrs. C.C. O'Rourke 

Christine Parker 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Parlato 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard F. Perry 

Herbert & Joanne Peterson 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Philibosian 

John J. Philips 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Postiglione 

Mr. & Mrs. Neal E. Prescott 

Elise S. Prichett 

Paul N. Pruneau 

Dr. & Mrs. John K. Quinlivan 

Edward J. & Barbara Quinn 

Teresa Radula 

Lawrence Rafferty 

Mr. & Mrs. Rodolpho S. Ramos 

Elizabeth Rasmussen 



John & Alice Reed 

Thomas J. Regan 

Max & Judith Richter 

C. Zenaida N. Riel 

SylB.Riel 

Mrs. Judith F. Rielly 

Ellen E. Riera 

Ruben & Mary Roca 

Gayle P. Roorda 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter V. Rosbeck 

Dennis R. Rossi, M.D. 

Judy & Joe Runkle 

Mr. & Mrs. Steven A. Running 

Mr. & Mrs. A.G. Rutherford 

Christopher Ruyak 

Thomas J. Ryan Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Rylander Sr. 

Peter & Joan Salerno 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. Saville 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael C. Schultz 

Chris S. Shay 

William Shea 

Dr. Barbara Sheer 

Mr. & Mrs. Tarrant F. Sibley 

Mickey & Arline Signorella 

John J. Siskowic Jr. 

Terry & Joann Smith 

David & Kathleen Smith 

The Robert Sorokolit Family 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Sriubas 

Mr. & Mrs. Mark W. Stevens 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert St. Germain 

Robert Streck 

Barbara Sturdivant 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Sullivan 

Best Wishes Brian Sweeney, From Your Family 

Christian & Lydia Tolentino 



% 



450 Patrons and Benefactors 



/T 



Mr. & Mrs. Dennis M. Tulimieri 
John W. & Juliann M. Tynan 
Mr. & Mrs. John T. Vaughan 
Mr. & Mrs. John J. Walsh 
Roy & Kathleen Walters 



% 



Patrons 



Peter & Eileen West 
Brian S. & Louise Willett 
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick A. Wolf 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Wronski 



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-i-if;^t 




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& Much More 



The Office of University Housing thanks and congratulates all 

members of the Resident Staff, especially those in the Class of 

1991. Your service, dedication, and loyalty to Boston College set 

new standards of excellence. 



Robert O. Jose 
Associate Director 
Residential Life 



Linda J. Riley 

Associate Director 

Operations /Financial Management 



Robert F. Capalbo, Ph.D. 
Director 



452 Closing 




Congratulations 

Margaret Goetz, Bill Murphy, Andrea Benoit, Maureen Marshall, Cynthia Heaney, 

Ian Klimon, and Jay Savage 

Class of 1991 

from 

The Height 

The Independent Student Weekly of Boston College 




TMIE 
BOSTON COLLEGE 
COM1P1UTEE STOEE 

TO HELP YOU ACmEVE YOUR 



FUTURE GOALS. 






GREAT COMPUTERS 
AT GREAT PRICES 



W^' 







Gasson 15 



IBM 



Hours: M-F 10-4 pm 
Authorized Dealers 



g 



AREER 
ENTER 



X)F BOSTON COLLEGE, 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1991 

Career Center services are always 
available to you as alumni. 

•Alumni Career Network 

•Current Job Listings 

•Career Resource Library 

•Job Search Workshops /Career Programs 

•Individual Appointments 

•Evening Hours on Mondays 
during the academic year 



Closing 453 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to 

The Class of 1991 

from 

Yearbook Associates 

Official School Photographers 
Millers Falls, MA 



454 Closing 



The staff of Sub Turri would like to 
congratulate its graduating seniors; 

Rich Buckley, Kate Cartas, Kerry Delaney, Dawn Dlouhy, Mike Dolan, 

Christine Fogarty, Colleen Hasey, Becky Hiltunen, Debbie Lee, 

Mary Manion, Kristy Mathews, Jim McGinty, and Maryrochelle Te. 

t 

We couldn't have done it without youHl 



And , , . 



I A very special thank you to Hunter Publishing Co., 

a Division ofjostens, Inc. 



Closing 455 




Photography 
Editor 

Mary Manion 



456 Sub Turri Staff 



1991 
Photography Staff 



staff 
Members 

Alexander Giamino, Kristy Mathews, Mike Dolan, 

Maryrochelle Te, Sheryl Tierney, Missing Photographers — Colleen 

Hasey, Cheryl Simrany, Debbie Lee 




Sub Turri staff 457 



1991 

Editorial 

Staff 



Sports Editors 

Jim McGinty, Rich Buckley 





Senior Section Editors 

Christine Fogarty, Kerry Delaney 



458 Sub Turri Staff 




Business Managers 

John DeSimone, Christine Weiner 



Copy Editors 

Kate Canas, Chris Benjamin 




Sub Turri Staff 459 



Academics Editors 

Mike Haggerty, Kevin Sullivan 





Activities Editors 

Liz McGuire, Kelly Moran 



460 Sub Turri Staff 




Student Life Editor 

Cathy Alecci 



Student Life Staff 

Kathleen Haley 





Copy Staff 

Jonathan Mulrooney, Cynthia Heaney 



Sub Turri staff 461 




Editors-in-Chief 

Dawn Dlouhy, Becky Hiltunen 

Friends, 

Well, here it is — the 1991 edition of the Sub Turri, There are so many things we would like to say about it, 
yet there isn't enough space to do this project justice. Although there were a few moments along the line 
when yearbook was not our favorite topic of discussion, the final product was definitely worth the wait. 

We would really like to commend the 1991 staff on an outstanding job. Jim and IVIary — this Is our last 
time! Our new staff members also deserve a very big thank you, especially Kerry and Chris, for all the 
long and tedious hours they put in. The underclassmen members were also fantastic, and we hope you 
all continue to be so successful. 

Although there is not enough space to thank everyone, there are a few special people we would like 
to remember. Thank you: Chris Clark and UGBC Communications for graciously putting up with our 
mess; our roommates, Odie and Cheryl, for answering the phone at SiOOAIVI and putting up with us; the 
girls in D55; Ed Ralicki and Yearbook Associates; Arnie Lohmann of Hunter; artist Rick Brooks, who cre- 
ated the cover; Jackie Fangouil, 1990 Sub Turri Editor; Carol Hughes and ODSD; Fr. McGowan; Diane at 
B.C. Press; a special thanks to an outstanding photo editor — Mary Manion; our patrons, benefactors, 
and advertisers; the Class of 1991; and thanks, most of all, to our parents. 

Good luck to next year's editors, Cathy and Kerri, and the whole staffi 

Sincerely, 



P.S. Good luck muffin! 

P.P.S. Don't forget the yearbook word of the year! 



}t^' 



/ri/ 




462 Sub Turri Staff 



Colophon 

The 1991 edition of the Sub Turri was published by 
Hunter Publishing Company, a division of Jostens in 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The 79th volume had a 
press run of 2100 copies. Pages were printed using 100% 
black ink with pages 33-464 on dull stock 801b paper 
and 1-32 on lustre text 901b European gloss paper. The 
opening section is done on 100% black mat with 
varnished photographs. The cover is maroon on French 
Cord grain with bevelled debossed gold lettering and 
black rub applied to the gates. Each copy is hand 
rubbed with black ink to enhance detail in the design. 
The cover, end sheets, and divider pages were de- 
signed by artist Rick Brooks. End sheets are 651b cover 
stock. The primary type style is Avant Book in 12 point font 
with 2 point leading. Headlines are done in Times Bold 
and captions are done in 6 point Times Roman. Other 
headline styles were decided by each section editor for 
their respective pages. Spreads for the senior section 
were done on Yeartech software and printed on a Mac- 
intosh laser printer. All color photographs were made 
from color transparencies of photos taken by Sub Turri 
Photo Staff, Senior portraiture was done by Yearbook 
Associates of Millers Falls, MA. Black and white film was 
developed, printed and processed by the 1991 Photog- 
raphy Staff. No parts of this book may be reproduced 
without express written consent of the Sub Turri Staff. All 
correspondence should be made to Sub Turri, McElroy 
103, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02167. 

Copyright, 1991 Sub Turri, the Yearbook of Boston Col- 
lege. 

Becky Hiltunen 8c Dawn DIouhy 
Editors-in-Chief, 1991 



Colophon 463 




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464 Closing 



I